Maze Electro, Industrial mind.area After putting this review on stagnation for a quite a while (and by that, I mean a couple of days), I finally found inspiration to sit down and type out the review for mind.area's Maze. While it sounds inspired, and tries to remain different from a lot of other electro and experimental sounds out there, which it does succeed in, I find it difficult to sit down and enjoy the album. I think this thought was most present from the get go, when I sat down and listened to Destiny. I was not a huge fan of the vocals, and the low beat mixed in really just did not hit me in the face like it should've. It tries to get a bit more going later in, as I feel like I'm definitely rolling with some eighties inspired synth work, but it really just does not do much for me. And I actually just skipped the track after I listened to it the first time. A standard template follows the rest of the album for being different, but not being masterful. And that's where I really come at a standstill for this album, running out of things to say. I mean, I could go on, talking about different songs and the different acts that support them, but in all other words, I will just come out saying that I am rather bored with this album. There's nothing rather interesting about this album, nothing that really goes above and beyond. I think there's a lot of talent within the album, that I can say with an open smile, but the talent is just being wasted. I suppose everyone has their niche, and while mind.area hasn't exactly found theirs as of yet, it's still a decent project to take a look at. I suppose this is just the threshold (even though the project began back in 2004) for the artist to start out with. Sometimes, it just takes more time for wine to become that much better. Perhaps that is the case with this artist. And, with that said, I really have no more to say. Have a nice day. 350
Brutal Resonance

mind.area - Maze

5.5
"Mediocre"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2012 by Ionium Records
After putting this review on stagnation for a quite a while (and by that, I mean a couple of days), I finally found inspiration to sit down and type out the review for mind.area's Maze. While it sounds inspired, and tries to remain different from a lot of other electro and experimental sounds out there, which it does succeed in, I find it difficult to sit down and enjoy the album.

I think this thought was most present from the get go, when I sat down and listened to Destiny. I was not a huge fan of the vocals, and the low beat mixed in really just did not hit me in the face like it should've. It tries to get a bit more going later in, as I feel like I'm definitely rolling with some eighties inspired synth work, but it really just does not do much for me. And I actually just skipped the track after I listened to it the first time. A standard template follows the rest of the album for being different, but not being masterful.

And that's where I really come at a standstill for this album, running out of things to say. I mean, I could go on, talking about different songs and the different acts that support them, but in all other words, I will just come out saying that I am rather bored with this album.

There's nothing rather interesting about this album, nothing that really goes above and beyond. I think there's a lot of talent within the album, that I can say with an open smile, but the talent is just being wasted. I suppose everyone has their niche, and while mind.area hasn't exactly found theirs as of yet, it's still a decent project to take a look at. I suppose this is just the threshold (even though the project began back in 2004) for the artist to start out with. Sometimes, it just takes more time for wine to become that much better. Perhaps that is the case with this artist. And, with that said, I really have no more to say. Have a nice day. Aug 13 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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