Vain Machine - Lost
Industrial, EBM Just two months back, Vain Machine released their EP Push via AnalogueTrash. Now, I remember being awfully pleased with the canon track on the EP, but not necessarily completely finding entertainment within the remixes. And, because of that, the question eventually begged, "How would this duo appeal to my aural senses with a full length release?" And now I have the answer to my very own question as Lost is due only one month from now, and I've been listening to it for the entirety of my day.

The title track Lost delivers what seems to be standard EBM fare before hitting you with an amazing chorus that adds in heavy synths and an additional backing digitalized voice which kicked my ass. Continue on into So Much For Fate (All For Nothing) and you'll be delivered a slower track, but engages again during the chorus. Strike The Wire would be perhaps the first song I just could not dive right into, and I felt more or less obliged to skip it.

But, oh, the ever breathtaking instrumental track Fade Away came in next and served as the highlight of the album. Playing with the electronics, a very different sound emerged from this duo. Slower moving at the same time serving in piano chords and an echo to add a little atmosphere, it was gorgeous.

Nonetheless, as much as I wished to stick on that song for a long while, there was more to explore. X-Ray hit in next with a more positive vibe, but not as positive lyrical content. Still, the bounciness of the beat was fun. Broken sort of followed suit with the more positive rhythm, and the last track on the album, Push, I've covered previously, so my comments remain the same.

And then the remix section followed. Strike The Wire got a remix by David Burdick. Not differing from the original other than perhaps pumping up the bass, making the synths heavier, and adding more of an echo, I just didn't see reason to listen to this mix over the canon.

Assemblage 23 touched up Broken nicely, adding in additional sounds and chimes to push forward that bright sound I talked about earlier. The Push (Infinite Mix by Nordika) was a fairy stripped version, allowing the simple driving line of the song to maintain control. But, sometimes keeping it simple works for the best. As was the case this time around. The mix done by People Theater was fun, got me wiggling my toes to follow the beat, and the last one done by Ruined Conflict definitely took on a more electro approach and was very well done.

While I wasn't completely awe-struck with this album, Vain Machine has proven that they can craft a good album with quite good tracks involved. The remixes chosen were, for the most part, pretty well done, but I still prefer the original mixes myself. Slap on a damn good instrumental between all the frenzy, and I'd say you got yourself decent album. Crank up your speakers and sit back and relax as you're about to get Lost.
4
Brutal Resonance

Vain Machine - Lost

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2015 by AnalogueTrash
Just two months back, Vain Machine released their EP Push via AnalogueTrash. Now, I remember being awfully pleased with the canon track on the EP, but not necessarily completely finding entertainment within the remixes. And, because of that, the question eventually begged, "How would this duo appeal to my aural senses with a full length release?" And now I have the answer to my very own question as Lost is due only one month from now, and I've been listening to it for the entirety of my day.

The title track Lost delivers what seems to be standard EBM fare before hitting you with an amazing chorus that adds in heavy synths and an additional backing digitalized voice which kicked my ass. Continue on into So Much For Fate (All For Nothing) and you'll be delivered a slower track, but engages again during the chorus. Strike The Wire would be perhaps the first song I just could not dive right into, and I felt more or less obliged to skip it.

But, oh, the ever breathtaking instrumental track Fade Away came in next and served as the highlight of the album. Playing with the electronics, a very different sound emerged from this duo. Slower moving at the same time serving in piano chords and an echo to add a little atmosphere, it was gorgeous.

Nonetheless, as much as I wished to stick on that song for a long while, there was more to explore. X-Ray hit in next with a more positive vibe, but not as positive lyrical content. Still, the bounciness of the beat was fun. Broken sort of followed suit with the more positive rhythm, and the last track on the album, Push, I've covered previously, so my comments remain the same.

And then the remix section followed. Strike The Wire got a remix by David Burdick. Not differing from the original other than perhaps pumping up the bass, making the synths heavier, and adding more of an echo, I just didn't see reason to listen to this mix over the canon.

Assemblage 23 touched up Broken nicely, adding in additional sounds and chimes to push forward that bright sound I talked about earlier. The Push (Infinite Mix by Nordika) was a fairy stripped version, allowing the simple driving line of the song to maintain control. But, sometimes keeping it simple works for the best. As was the case this time around. The mix done by People Theater was fun, got me wiggling my toes to follow the beat, and the last one done by Ruined Conflict definitely took on a more electro approach and was very well done.

While I wasn't completely awe-struck with this album, Vain Machine has proven that they can craft a good album with quite good tracks involved. The remixes chosen were, for the most part, pretty well done, but I still prefer the original mixes myself. Slap on a damn good instrumental between all the frenzy, and I'd say you got yourself decent album. Crank up your speakers and sit back and relax as you're about to get Lost. Jan 17 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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