Mono Electronic Density - Untold World
Anhalt EBM, Old School EBM There are certain things you do not find uncoupled from their twin. Ying and Yang, German Porn and Moustaches, Bacon and Eggs, and Belgium and EBM.

I have been aware of M.3.D (official acronym and band name dictates that the 3 (or backwards E) is acceptable replacement for the generic "E") since early 2010. Consisting of Bernard Feron (vocals, lyrics, composition) and Jean-Marc Mélot (Keyboards, composition, production, mixing), M.3.D, like Front 242 before them, are an act enamoured with the roots of the scene we all know and love, yet somehow manage to weave this passion with a modern day post-millennium sound.

Documenting ideals of a world quite different to ours, devoid of colours, somewhere between creation and destruction, M.3.D is half Nitzer Ebb, half Front 242, with a tiny drop of Gary Numan (an unreleased track actually covers Numan's "Prayer for the Unborn").

"Come Into My Place" offers us the best aspects of old-school EBM, but manages to grapple it's way into 2011, and manages to maintain a synth program that manages to sound both vintage, refreshing, and relevant in todays EBM culture.

"Energy" is undeniably the track that M.3.D would want to use as a proverbial avatar for the project. The band aim to overload people with as much energy as they can, and it's clear with the fast-paced overload of music that they're deadly serious.

From Inception to Delivery, we are taken on a whirlwind of Sex and seduction ("Come into my Place" - nice innuendo, also), warnings and concerns about Earth and our future ("The World is Done" and "Infinite Melancholy"), and tracks that would just fit in nicely on any J-M Lederman project ("Miss V", "The Last Resistance").

Essentially, 12 tracks of this calibre on a debut album is a sure-fire way to wake up anyone who has their head in the sand regarding the lack of fresh talent on this scene, and considering this is effectly self-released, It's only a matter of time until they Lock the target, and get the man.
4
Brutal Resonance

Mono Electronic Density - Untold World

There are certain things you do not find uncoupled from their twin. Ying and Yang, German Porn and Moustaches, Bacon and Eggs, and Belgium and EBM.

I have been aware of M.3.D (official acronym and band name dictates that the 3 (or backwards E) is acceptable replacement for the generic "E") since early 2010. Consisting of Bernard Feron (vocals, lyrics, composition) and Jean-Marc Mélot (Keyboards, composition, production, mixing), M.3.D, like Front 242 before them, are an act enamoured with the roots of the scene we all know and love, yet somehow manage to weave this passion with a modern day post-millennium sound.

Documenting ideals of a world quite different to ours, devoid of colours, somewhere between creation and destruction, M.3.D is half Nitzer Ebb, half Front 242, with a tiny drop of Gary Numan (an unreleased track actually covers Numan's "Prayer for the Unborn").

"Come Into My Place" offers us the best aspects of old-school EBM, but manages to grapple it's way into 2011, and manages to maintain a synth program that manages to sound both vintage, refreshing, and relevant in todays EBM culture.

"Energy" is undeniably the track that M.3.D would want to use as a proverbial avatar for the project. The band aim to overload people with as much energy as they can, and it's clear with the fast-paced overload of music that they're deadly serious.

From Inception to Delivery, we are taken on a whirlwind of Sex and seduction ("Come into my Place" - nice innuendo, also), warnings and concerns about Earth and our future ("The World is Done" and "Infinite Melancholy"), and tracks that would just fit in nicely on any J-M Lederman project ("Miss V", "The Last Resistance").

Essentially, 12 tracks of this calibre on a debut album is a sure-fire way to wake up anyone who has their head in the sand regarding the lack of fresh talent on this scene, and considering this is effectly self-released, It's only a matter of time until they Lock the target, and get the man.
Apr 06 2011

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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