Isserley - Misanthropy Exhibition
Experimental, Industrial Just shortly after releasing her album "S A D P O S T I N G", the self-proclaimed sad girl and industrial/experimental producer Isserley has struck back with a new EP titled "Misanthropy Exhibition". Not shy with releasing her stuff in short periods of time, Isserley has brought four new songs with the help of a New York based producer Ripley Sterling. As always, the EP is full of Isserley's key black humor and noise riddled sad girl music. 

The album starts off with 'Symmetrical', an EBM influenced dark dance song. It was a little odd finding this on "Misanthropy Exhibition" as Isserley is more the experimental type rather than upbeat. Despite that bouncy beat, the ambient workings in the background keep the tone in check to Isserley's depraved sense of humor while the lyrics still remain part depressing and part gore filled: "They all say I taste like the hospital/Numb and sterile/I can't wait to feel what you're like on the inside." Her vocals still remain the same from her prior releases maintaining rhythm yet having a downright depressing attitude about them - this might not work with most other bands, but Isserley makes it work phenomenally. 

'I Hurt Myself For Attention' brings us back into the wicked world of Isserley's darker experimental nature. Hints of blown up and distorted beats, the sound of a hospital's life line, and an overall concoction of noise create one hell of a track. Quite literal in its interpretation, the founder and sole member of the project Roxxi Wallace stated in an interview with us that the song is based on the frenzied, angered, desperate, and confused state a person is in when they self-harm. 

'The Final Girl' sees Isserley sample her own voice quite frequently in hums throughout the background as the lo-fi beat continues to reign supreme. The horror movie enthusiast wrote this song as an ode to the slasher trope the final girl wherein after the massacre, when the last remaining survivor has to return to life, how does she cope and return to life? This song was an exploration in that nature and therefore remains one of the more ominous pieces on the album. 

The last song on the album 'Cry About It' borders the line of rhythmic noise as it is full to the brim with static beats and harsh ambiance filtered throughout. There is not too much lyrical content within the song, but towards the three minute mark you'll hear Roxxi state over and over, "Kill me...Kill me," as if this character is trapped within a catatonic state and wants out by any means necessary. 

Thought not her longest release "Misanthropy Exhibition" manages to stand on its own with another rag tag group of tracks. While Isserley's songs are never coherent with one another on an album, they all have her trademark sound, humor, and lyrical delivery which you cannot find anywhere else - as far as I know thus far. The album is currently available via Bandcamp under the "Pay What You Want" moniker so go grab it. 


4
Brutal Resonance

Isserley - Misanthropy Exhibition

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2018
Just shortly after releasing her album "S A D P O S T I N G", the self-proclaimed sad girl and industrial/experimental producer Isserley has struck back with a new EP titled "Misanthropy Exhibition". Not shy with releasing her stuff in short periods of time, Isserley has brought four new songs with the help of a New York based producer Ripley Sterling. As always, the EP is full of Isserley's key black humor and noise riddled sad girl music. 

The album starts off with 'Symmetrical', an EBM influenced dark dance song. It was a little odd finding this on "Misanthropy Exhibition" as Isserley is more the experimental type rather than upbeat. Despite that bouncy beat, the ambient workings in the background keep the tone in check to Isserley's depraved sense of humor while the lyrics still remain part depressing and part gore filled: "They all say I taste like the hospital/Numb and sterile/I can't wait to feel what you're like on the inside." Her vocals still remain the same from her prior releases maintaining rhythm yet having a downright depressing attitude about them - this might not work with most other bands, but Isserley makes it work phenomenally. 

'I Hurt Myself For Attention' brings us back into the wicked world of Isserley's darker experimental nature. Hints of blown up and distorted beats, the sound of a hospital's life line, and an overall concoction of noise create one hell of a track. Quite literal in its interpretation, the founder and sole member of the project Roxxi Wallace stated in an interview with us that the song is based on the frenzied, angered, desperate, and confused state a person is in when they self-harm. 

'The Final Girl' sees Isserley sample her own voice quite frequently in hums throughout the background as the lo-fi beat continues to reign supreme. The horror movie enthusiast wrote this song as an ode to the slasher trope the final girl wherein after the massacre, when the last remaining survivor has to return to life, how does she cope and return to life? This song was an exploration in that nature and therefore remains one of the more ominous pieces on the album. 

The last song on the album 'Cry About It' borders the line of rhythmic noise as it is full to the brim with static beats and harsh ambiance filtered throughout. There is not too much lyrical content within the song, but towards the three minute mark you'll hear Roxxi state over and over, "Kill me...Kill me," as if this character is trapped within a catatonic state and wants out by any means necessary. 

Thought not her longest release "Misanthropy Exhibition" manages to stand on its own with another rag tag group of tracks. While Isserley's songs are never coherent with one another on an album, they all have her trademark sound, humor, and lyrical delivery which you cannot find anywhere else - as far as I know thus far. The album is currently available via Bandcamp under the "Pay What You Want" moniker so go grab it. 


Feb 25 2018

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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