Site favorite and industrial / experimental producer Isserley is a constantly moving and non-stop musician. Just last year along Isserley released over ten albums and EPs combined. While outputs may have been slowed down slightly this year, Isserley's constant demand for barrier breaking production has not stopped her from creating something that fans were not expecting. This came, even to my surprise, in the form of an experimental doom metal album titled "Insides" (available fore download / purchase HERE). That being said, I wanted to get the nitty-gritty on Isserley's new album so with an invitation to the site once more, Isserley and I talk about the new album and how it came to be. 


Hello, Isserley, and welcome back to the site! Today we're gonna be taking a dive into your new album “Insides”. First of all, let's talk about the cover art – which might be a bit striking to most at first glance. What does the cover art represent and why did you choose to go with this design?

Isserley: It's a really literal representation; this girl with her insides on the outside, showing all of the hidden parts of herself and such. That's kinda my approach to music in general so I wanted to be really clear that from now on I'd be taking a more personal and visceral approach to making music. This album really marks the start of me taking the songwriting more seriously. I want to use art as a form of autopsy; of self-examination. This was a fun way of showing it visually.

Most of your previous material was focused around industrial, dark ambient, experimental, and noisey influences that generally fit around those four genres. So, why did you choose to use primarily doom metal influences on this album?

Isserley: It was just a matter of being able to. I've always wanted to make this kinda music but I'd never been able to until now. It doesn't mean the end of all the other stuff; I'm working on something more harsh and electronic on the side right now but being able to explore this whole other side of myself musically has been so cool for me. It's really woken me back up creatively.

Doom metal is not straying far from the dark territory you've already established with your music in the past. However, some from your fanbase might find it irregular or distaseful. So far, though, I've seen nothing but positive comments about the release; have you heard anything negative yet?

Isserley: I think the worst thing I've heard is that the genre wasn't something they could get behind, which is what I expected. I kinda had it in my head nobody would care for this album at all; it's so different and I've been doing electronic and noise for so long that I wasn't expecting many people to get into it but they have! It's been really scary. It's like starting over again and needing to find people to listen all over again but I'm really grateful for the people who support what I do. It can be something that goes above genre if you just put enough of yourself into something.

What themes does the album follow? A lot of your previous material follows cynical sarcasm masking the uncertainty and dread of everyday life. Does this album follow suit, or does it touch on different subjects?

Isserley: "Insides" is the first album where I've really started to let my guard down. I do hide behind a lot of sarcasm and irony. I'm so overly cynical it can be hard to get anything genuine out of me. There's been something changing inside me lately that makes me want to be true to myself, even in ways that are devastating or harmful. I want to be as me as I can, and "Insides" was the beginning of me going all the way with that musically. That's the direction I wanna take from now on, complete honesty, to find myself through my music.


I also saw that you collaborated once more with Ripley Sterling on the release, a former collaborator on your previous EP “Misanthropy Exhibition”. How do you two work together? Do you lay out the main song and take advice from Sterling, or do you two work hand-in-hand to make the music?

Isserley: Yeah! Working with Ripley is great, we're very close friends, so there's a really laid back nature to making it all. As for the process for "Insides", it just depends on the song. Sometimes I'd write the music myself, other times he'd come up with something and we'd work on that. We both put a lot into it and we're already working on a follow-up to "Insides".

I think I may have asked you in this in the past but with so many recent additions to your discography, I think I need to refresh this question. Which of your favorite albums / EPs is your favorite thus far?

Isserley: It's tough to answer that sometimes. The album I'm working on right now is easily the most personal thing I've ever done so I wanna say that, but I had so much release working on "My Exterminatus" as well which was just a lot of harsh noise and heavy industrial. "Insides" has a really special place in my heart too and is probably the number one out of everything I've released so far, it's crazy that it even exists.

You're always on the prowl, making new music and releasing it via Bandcamp it's almost hard to keep up. That being said, what are you currently working on? Do you have any upcoming EPs, singles, albums in the works? Any live shows? Etc.?

Isserley: Yeah, I think I had a total of eleven releases last year just on Bandcamp alone. This year's been a lot slower though in that way, I've been working mostly on doing the music for video games. There's a game coming out soon called "Now You See" which I did all of the music for and It's shaping up to be really awesome. I've got two new albums I'm working on as well. One is a full doom-metal album that I'm working on with Ripley and the other is a really harsh, manic industrial/electronic thing, It's hard to categorize but hopefully both will be out soon!

What are you currently listening to? Any new musicians you think fans or people in general should put on their radar?

Isserley: It's kinda silly but I've actually been listening to a lot of KK Slider, the cute dog from Animal Crossing with the guitar. He's got hours of music out there on the net, and It's unironically pretty great. SKYND is a new band that I'm really loving, It's a neat combo of Industrial, rock and some pop production. $waggot, Black Dresses and Delcada are constantly being played at Isserley HQ too, I love stuff that combines the best parts of pop with all the worst parts of being alive.

And, last but not least, I'd like to thank you for your time as per normal, and I leave the space below for any final words you may have. Cheers!

Isserley: It's always a pleasure, thank you so much for having me! 
Isserley interview
August 31, 2019
Brutal Resonance

Isserley

Aug 2019
Site favorite and industrial / experimental producer Isserley is a constantly moving and non-stop musician. Just last year along Isserley released over ten albums and EPs combined. While outputs may have been slowed down slightly this year, Isserley's constant demand for barrier breaking production has not stopped her from creating something that fans were not expecting. This came, even to my surprise, in the form of an experimental doom metal album titled "Insides" (available fore download / purchase HERE). That being said, I wanted to get the nitty-gritty on Isserley's new album so with an invitation to the site once more, Isserley and I talk about the new album and how it came to be. 


Hello, Isserley, and welcome back to the site! Today we're gonna be taking a dive into your new album “Insides”. First of all, let's talk about the cover art – which might be a bit striking to most at first glance. What does the cover art represent and why did you choose to go with this design?

Isserley: It's a really literal representation; this girl with her insides on the outside, showing all of the hidden parts of herself and such. That's kinda my approach to music in general so I wanted to be really clear that from now on I'd be taking a more personal and visceral approach to making music. This album really marks the start of me taking the songwriting more seriously. I want to use art as a form of autopsy; of self-examination. This was a fun way of showing it visually.

Most of your previous material was focused around industrial, dark ambient, experimental, and noisey influences that generally fit around those four genres. So, why did you choose to use primarily doom metal influences on this album?

Isserley: It was just a matter of being able to. I've always wanted to make this kinda music but I'd never been able to until now. It doesn't mean the end of all the other stuff; I'm working on something more harsh and electronic on the side right now but being able to explore this whole other side of myself musically has been so cool for me. It's really woken me back up creatively.

Doom metal is not straying far from the dark territory you've already established with your music in the past. However, some from your fanbase might find it irregular or distaseful. So far, though, I've seen nothing but positive comments about the release; have you heard anything negative yet?

Isserley: I think the worst thing I've heard is that the genre wasn't something they could get behind, which is what I expected. I kinda had it in my head nobody would care for this album at all; it's so different and I've been doing electronic and noise for so long that I wasn't expecting many people to get into it but they have! It's been really scary. It's like starting over again and needing to find people to listen all over again but I'm really grateful for the people who support what I do. It can be something that goes above genre if you just put enough of yourself into something.

What themes does the album follow? A lot of your previous material follows cynical sarcasm masking the uncertainty and dread of everyday life. Does this album follow suit, or does it touch on different subjects?

Isserley: "Insides" is the first album where I've really started to let my guard down. I do hide behind a lot of sarcasm and irony. I'm so overly cynical it can be hard to get anything genuine out of me. There's been something changing inside me lately that makes me want to be true to myself, even in ways that are devastating or harmful. I want to be as me as I can, and "Insides" was the beginning of me going all the way with that musically. That's the direction I wanna take from now on, complete honesty, to find myself through my music.


I also saw that you collaborated once more with Ripley Sterling on the release, a former collaborator on your previous EP “Misanthropy Exhibition”. How do you two work together? Do you lay out the main song and take advice from Sterling, or do you two work hand-in-hand to make the music?

Isserley: Yeah! Working with Ripley is great, we're very close friends, so there's a really laid back nature to making it all. As for the process for "Insides", it just depends on the song. Sometimes I'd write the music myself, other times he'd come up with something and we'd work on that. We both put a lot into it and we're already working on a follow-up to "Insides".

I think I may have asked you in this in the past but with so many recent additions to your discography, I think I need to refresh this question. Which of your favorite albums / EPs is your favorite thus far?

Isserley: It's tough to answer that sometimes. The album I'm working on right now is easily the most personal thing I've ever done so I wanna say that, but I had so much release working on "My Exterminatus" as well which was just a lot of harsh noise and heavy industrial. "Insides" has a really special place in my heart too and is probably the number one out of everything I've released so far, it's crazy that it even exists.

You're always on the prowl, making new music and releasing it via Bandcamp it's almost hard to keep up. That being said, what are you currently working on? Do you have any upcoming EPs, singles, albums in the works? Any live shows? Etc.?

Isserley: Yeah, I think I had a total of eleven releases last year just on Bandcamp alone. This year's been a lot slower though in that way, I've been working mostly on doing the music for video games. There's a game coming out soon called "Now You See" which I did all of the music for and It's shaping up to be really awesome. I've got two new albums I'm working on as well. One is a full doom-metal album that I'm working on with Ripley and the other is a really harsh, manic industrial/electronic thing, It's hard to categorize but hopefully both will be out soon!

What are you currently listening to? Any new musicians you think fans or people in general should put on their radar?

Isserley: It's kinda silly but I've actually been listening to a lot of KK Slider, the cute dog from Animal Crossing with the guitar. He's got hours of music out there on the net, and It's unironically pretty great. SKYND is a new band that I'm really loving, It's a neat combo of Industrial, rock and some pop production. $waggot, Black Dresses and Delcada are constantly being played at Isserley HQ too, I love stuff that combines the best parts of pop with all the worst parts of being alive.

And, last but not least, I'd like to thank you for your time as per normal, and I leave the space below for any final words you may have. Cheers!

Isserley: It's always a pleasure, thank you so much for having me! 
Aug 31 2019

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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