Grendel - Age of the Disposable Body (Deluxe)
Harsh EBM The current sound Grendel produces began with 2007's Harsh Generation. Even as the project took a stand with the harsh club sound aggrotech provided there was a wish to advance with melodic content and better production value. That potential was unlocked with the release of a contemporary industrial classic Timewave Zero, whose club hits and cover art has become a staple in my personal discography. Timewave Zero was well aware of the roots of the band and still stuck to some tropes from previous releases and the like. That being said, 2017 sees Grendel set in motion their desire for clean cut production qualities and melodic electro-industrial with Age of the Disposable Body

The album is not shy in addressing social and political issues in a science-fiction fueled dystopia as noted within the opening lines of 'Magnum Opus'. This is a time where I would point out a few tracks that tackle those issues but that is moot considering nearly all the songs on the album are able to speak up and out against such totalitarianism. Grendel pushes out a deafening and empowering cry for freedom and independence - something that is necessary in the coming days if dark skies shall reign. 

The ten songs found on the album are absolute bangers for the dance floor and for personal listening. The sweetening saxophone section (Yes, I had to mention it like everyone else) found on 'Severed Nation' made the hair on the back of my neck stand up the first time I heard it while songs such as the cyberpunk infused 'Dead Inside' made me want to stomp as hard as I could. The title track of the album 'AOTDB' deserves a fair share of recognition due in part to its fantastic acoustic opening that seemlessly blends into an emotional mixture of electronic guitar, darkened synths, and masterful vocals. 

It was also when I listened to 'AOTDB' that I first recognized just how much I was enjoying the vocals on Age of the Disposable Body. With less focus on such aggressive chords I was given a human element to Grendel's work - something that may have been lacking on previous releases. This relation allowed me to further myself into Grendel's work more than I have ever done before. The feeling was and still is bliss. 

I also found it shocking to see that The Invalid made an appearance on track six 'Far Away'. I am not complaining about this by far as the last I have heard of the project was when he released his last album The Aesthetics of Failure. Either way, it was great to hear him back in action once again and - I believe I speak for all of us at Brutal Resonance - hope to hear more from him soon. 

There are a ton of remixes available in the Deluxe Edition of Age of the Disposable Body from a host of skilled producers including Shiv-R, Panic Lift, High Functioning Flesh, and many more. My favorite of the remixes comes from Spitmask's rendition on 'Hex It'. The percussion kicks and the vocals turn harsh for a turn giving the track a down and dirty drive. 

Age of the Disposable Body is another timeless classic from Grendel that will most likely remain a staple for years to come. The rock solid production, addicting themes and rhythms has already won over industrial enthusiasts throughout the world and we at Brutal Resonance have been caught in this wave of euphoria. 

4
Brutal Resonance

Grendel - Age of the Disposable Body (Deluxe)

8.5
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2017 by Infacted Recordings
The current sound Grendel produces began with 2007's Harsh Generation. Even as the project took a stand with the harsh club sound aggrotech provided there was a wish to advance with melodic content and better production value. That potential was unlocked with the release of a contemporary industrial classic Timewave Zero, whose club hits and cover art has become a staple in my personal discography. Timewave Zero was well aware of the roots of the band and still stuck to some tropes from previous releases and the like. That being said, 2017 sees Grendel set in motion their desire for clean cut production qualities and melodic electro-industrial with Age of the Disposable Body

The album is not shy in addressing social and political issues in a science-fiction fueled dystopia as noted within the opening lines of 'Magnum Opus'. This is a time where I would point out a few tracks that tackle those issues but that is moot considering nearly all the songs on the album are able to speak up and out against such totalitarianism. Grendel pushes out a deafening and empowering cry for freedom and independence - something that is necessary in the coming days if dark skies shall reign. 

The ten songs found on the album are absolute bangers for the dance floor and for personal listening. The sweetening saxophone section (Yes, I had to mention it like everyone else) found on 'Severed Nation' made the hair on the back of my neck stand up the first time I heard it while songs such as the cyberpunk infused 'Dead Inside' made me want to stomp as hard as I could. The title track of the album 'AOTDB' deserves a fair share of recognition due in part to its fantastic acoustic opening that seemlessly blends into an emotional mixture of electronic guitar, darkened synths, and masterful vocals. 

It was also when I listened to 'AOTDB' that I first recognized just how much I was enjoying the vocals on Age of the Disposable Body. With less focus on such aggressive chords I was given a human element to Grendel's work - something that may have been lacking on previous releases. This relation allowed me to further myself into Grendel's work more than I have ever done before. The feeling was and still is bliss. 

I also found it shocking to see that The Invalid made an appearance on track six 'Far Away'. I am not complaining about this by far as the last I have heard of the project was when he released his last album The Aesthetics of Failure. Either way, it was great to hear him back in action once again and - I believe I speak for all of us at Brutal Resonance - hope to hear more from him soon. 

There are a ton of remixes available in the Deluxe Edition of Age of the Disposable Body from a host of skilled producers including Shiv-R, Panic Lift, High Functioning Flesh, and many more. My favorite of the remixes comes from Spitmask's rendition on 'Hex It'. The percussion kicks and the vocals turn harsh for a turn giving the track a down and dirty drive. 

Age of the Disposable Body is another timeless classic from Grendel that will most likely remain a staple for years to come. The rock solid production, addicting themes and rhythms has already won over industrial enthusiasts throughout the world and we at Brutal Resonance have been caught in this wave of euphoria. 

Nov 05 2017

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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