With Leaether Strip on the roster for Alt-Fest (find out more and buy tickets here: http://alt-fest.com/) , and with his recent release just having been put out this month, I took the time to have a lengthy discussion with the classic act about the history of the act, as well as his presence at Alt-Fest. Check it out!

Alright, I definitely want to go all the way back with the history of Leaether Strip. You have been around for a pretty long time. Officially speaking, you're first album was released in 1990. However, there have been demos afloat from '82 and '84. When did you really first start dabbling in electronic music?

Claus - "I bought my first Synth, a Moog Prodigy, in 82 after attending a concert with the Swedish band Twice a man. By some freak chance, the keyboard player from the support act was attending the same highschool as me, so he invited me home to see his studio, and he sold me the Moog, and started to learn me the basics, and I practiced learning basslines from Fad Gadget's first album."

And, also, to expand on that last question, why did you pick electronic music as an outlet for expression? Were you influenced by other artists, amazed by the sheer amount of possibilities within the genre, or did you just go with it out of the blue?

Claus - "I knew about electronic bands like J.M Jarre and Kraftwerk and I liked it, but back in the late 70's I was a teen punk only into Punk rock really, and one day I bought a 7" single placed in the punk section, only because I liked the cover art, and that was Fad Gadget's 'Back to nature' single, and then I was totally blown away, and my love for synth music started."

Which album of yours would you consider your breakthrough? And was it because it got you signed to a label, or was it just because the album had you saying, "This is why I want to create music."

Claus - "My debut 12" single 'Japanese bodies / Battleground' became an instant hit in the German electro clubs so I guess you can say that was my breakthrough, but the one that really opened doors and the album which has a big part in me still being around in the scene was "Solitary Confinement", this album changed my life. I already knew back in 82-83 that my future would have to be in the music scene in some form. I'm sure I would still be writing songs even if I never had a record deal, it's such a big part of me and I need that release to stay sane."

Now, I know you were signed to the Zoth Ommog record label for a while in the 90s, however, the label went under soon enough. Did you feel saddened by the death of a label that you once considered home? Or did you not think on it too much?

Claus - "Yes, very, but the worst thing was finding out that the people at the label who I considered to be close family, wasn't my family at all, and that was the main reason for my massive depression that lasted 5 years and a huge financial loss plus I lost my whole backcatalouge stock, which is still being sold by some of the assholes who stole it online. I had to put it behind me to get over it, and I hope karma gets them in the end, they really deserve it."

I know that your project has changed course in sound at a few points or another such as in '94 when you released "Serenade for the Dead", which can be considered a concept album. Since then, however, you sort of went back to using dance elements. Do you change things up to be experimental? Or is it just so you don't get bored? Or, even, in the slightest, is it so your fans can always look for something new?

Claus - "'Serenade for the dead' and 'Serenade for the dead II' are not concept albums, at least I wont call them that. I was writing instrumental tracks even before i started Leæther Strip. I'm a big fan of many movie soundtracks and a collector too, and it's always been a huge inspiration source for me.

I have always been writing songs in different styles, from the very melodic to the very dark and harsh stuff. Writing music has never bored me one bit ever, sure there have been times when I need a few weeks away from the studio, but that's very rare, I'm always playing with ideas in my head for the next song. For me a good album needs to feel like a journey and I hate albums where every song sounds like it was made in the same day, my goal has always been to create something people can pull out in 50 years and still find it interesting because a well written song is timeless."

And then between '94 and '00, you were pretty silent aside from a tribute release to Soft Cell. What went on during that period? Was there a personal struggle, or were you working on a different release?

Claus - "I think you mean from 97 to 00. I released 'Self inflicted' end 97 and that was my 2nd biggest selling album after 'Solitary Confinement', and then the Zoth Ommog troubles started, then in 2000 I released the 'Carry me' EP on the Bloodline label, but that 'relationship' was very short lived."

And, again, from '00 to '05, Leaether Strip went silent in a way. What was the cause for this? Personal? Or did you just not have any ideas frothing at your mouth?

Claus - "Like I wrote earlier, I was beaten down like a slut in the gutter by the people I considered close family, I also lost my father that year and I just lost faith in people and totally lost my desire to make music 100%, I didn't write a song in almost 5 years, and the only reason I'm still here is because Kurt, my husband, helped me through it and was there for me every step of the way. No one who I had connected with in my 11 years on Zoth Ommog, or any other label I've workd with tried to get in touch with me, none..... This business is so full of leeches and the most disgustimg people you'll ever find. I have never kissed anyone's ass in my years in the music business or sold myself cheap to please these creeps and I'm proud of that.

Only reason I'm still doing it is because it's who I am and I need it, and most of all because of all the amazing people who are following my work and coming to our concerts. It's amazing to have people around the world interested in what I sit here and create in my little studio, kinda mindblowing actually."

I know that you signed to Alfa Matrix for a while in '05. Did you approach them, or did they approach you? And why did you accept Matrix as the new home for your music?

Claus - "They approached me back in late 2004, if I was interested in writing one song for a compilation, and I was in a good mood that day and the studio was still up and everything still worked after those years turned off. And I wrote "Suicide Bombers" which also became my come-back EP. It was like opening a floodgate, the inspiration just came back right away and after a few months I had an album done, 'After the devastation'. and my depression just went away as fast as it had arrived. Music is my therapy."

While with Alfa Matrix, you released a lot of box sets of your back catalogue. Was this so fans and newcomers alike could experience all of Leaether Strip in a new age?

Claus - "Yes, and also because they were out of stock, so fans had to pay too much for them online. I then got the idea to re-write many of the songs for these box's to make it a bit more interesting for me, and also the old fans. But it's nice that the young listeners are going back to hear how the scene started out back in the day."

And then in 2011, you left the Alfa Matrix label to self-release material. But, why did you leave Matrix? Was there a dispute or an argument? Or did you just feel the need to be freed from a label?

Claus - "My plans didn't fit their plans, so I left on good terms and we are still friends. I also wanted to try to see how self-releasing would work.

Alfa Matrix treated me nice and I owe them a lot for helping me to get back into the game."

Have you given thought to signing to a new label?

Claus - "At the moment I'm working on friendly terms with the German Label Emmo.biz Records, which is run by my friend Jörg. We don't have any contracts, just a verbal agreement and I'm really happy with that. He's also into catering to the collector fans by making boxes and vinyls and stuff, and that's very important, cause they are the people who are keeping this tiny scene alive."

You are somewhat influential in your given field. And, with that in mind, did you ever think of starting up your own record label?

Claus - "Yes, but I would never do it as long as I am still releasing my own stuff, because that takes all my time, with the composing and concerts and and all that. But I love mixing/remixing for other bands and it also helps to pay the bills. Maybe one day I'll start a label."

The one reason I often enjoyed your music is just for how blunt you come off in your songs. For example, "Suicide Bombers" tackles that issue directly, which I applause. Have you ever had any controversy erupt over your music or lyrics?

Claus - "The only song that really gave me issues was "the evil in Putins eyes" from 2008 (Civil Disobedience) I still get actual death threats from mainly Russia for that one. Doesn't bother me though, it's usually homophobic idiots who didn't even bother to read the lyric. My lyrics are mostly very personal and written from my point of view, and sometimes I can be very ironic and sarcastic, too. So people are bound to misunderstand them once in a while. I read about a guy getting kicked off an American plane for having the "Suicide bombers" EP cover out on the plane before leaving the gate and the passenger behind him reported it and the poor guy was dragged off the plane, it was even on Reuters news. "

I also understand that you have your side project, Klutae. Why was this side project formed? Did the themes differ from Leaether Strip? Or is it just a different style?

Claus - "Yes, all the releases in the 90's was made under the name "Klute" but, a UK band 'stole' the name and I changed it to Klutæ, cause I was tired of people thinking that I was doing jungle techno. Klutæ was started because after 4 years of hard work on Leæther Strip I needed a little break, and it was only intended to be a one time thing, one EP and that was it, but it was such a big success and I have so much fun doing it that it would be stupid to stop. Klutæ is my 'playground', I work in a much more spontaneous way and it's more Punk/metal inspired than Leæther Strip. Sometimes it crosses over and some Klutæ songs could sound like a Leæther Strip song, but after all it's the same person behind the keys so that's bound to happen. We also did about 10 Klutæ concerts and it's a lot of fun playing these songs live too."

Your latest album was just released on March 15th, Aescapism. Did you have any themes or ideas planted in this release, or did you just go with whatever was on the top of your head?

Claus - "I never really plan anything for an album. Sometimes I pick a working title. The title for 'Æscapism' wasn't picked until the last minute, the last song I wrote for this album was 'Sanctuary' and it's about escapism, and that title just fit the whole album I thought, cause that's what I do when I write songs. I take one song, and one topic, at a time and just go with the flow and what ever inspires me. And when there is about 15 to 20 songs written, it's time for a release."

Thus far, have you received any feedback on the album? And, if so, how has the response been?

Claus - "It's only been a few days, and I'm being bombed with great reviews from fans and DJ's. I think this is so far the best response I've gotten on a new album since my 2005 come-back, so I'm very very happy. The first limited edition digi-pack version is already sold out now I heard yesterday, so it's good to feel that there is still room for this old fart in the scene."

Do review sites, such as ours, ever really matter to you when you release an album? Does it ever hurt to see a low score on one of your works? And is it uplifting to see when someone has given you a higher score?

Claus - "All constructive responses, good or bad, matter to me, and I read them all if I get to see them. I would never release anything I wasn't 100% happy with, I have never done that and never will. You can also quickly spot a lazy reviewer who hasn't really listened to the album in full and just skipped after 30 seconds on each song, and it's just one person's opinion. So as long as I feel happy with what I've released, I'm satisfied. As soon as it leaves my hand, I've got not control over it anyway. Musicians shouldn't be too alarmed by bad reviews if you ask me. Many of my all time favorite albums by other bands got very shitty reviews, so you never know until you listen yourself."

I also see that you have a sort of tour planned out for 2014. You have several stops planned all about the world; Australia, Germany, Canada, and the UK. Do you have any more plans for the year to go to different locations?

Claus - "This 'tour' has been going since my stage come-back in 2009. We thought that we'd get a few shows the first year, but the booking's haven't stopped coming in and we've played in about 29 countries now since 09. We love playing live and we'll take all the bookings we can handle, if booked we'll play anywhere we're wanted. In May we got a 14-15 gig USA tour (and one in Canada) too. We toured the USA last July and it as so amazing that we wanted to return fast."

The one festival that I really want to crack down with you would be Alt-Fest. It's a new festival, and it's garnering up to be one of the bigger fests in the alternative scene. What are your thoughts on the festival? Is there too much hype, too little, or just enough?

Claus - "Yep, we can't wait for Alt-fest. I think it's about time someone tried to set up an Alternative festival of this magnitude in the UK, and what a line-up it is. I love the fact that it's crowd funded, and that just proves to me that the scene is far from dead, and more power to the people behind this for having the balls to do this. I know there is a lot of 'haters' who think it will never take place, but guess what, it will, there is not a doubt in my mind. We're very proud to be a part of it. Why shouldn't there be hype? There should be a lot more hype if you ask me, and where are the people with these kinds of 'balls' in the USA? America needs a festival like this and I'm sure it could be done if it's done in the same way as Alt-fest is done."

You'll be playing all three days at the fest, from August 15th to the 17th. Are you going to be pulling your whole catalog out to keep the show fresh, or are you going to be focusing on your newest material to promote your new endeavors?

Claus - "Nope we're only playing Sunday my friend. But we'll be there watching bands for the whole festival. I didn't make the set yet, but I think it will be like a 'best of' set."

Now, apart from just being at the fest yourself, are there any other bands that you're looking forward to meeting or seeing play live?

Claus - "I will be running around like a mad man trying to catch as many bands as possible. But the one you'll find me at from start to finish is Gary Numan."

One question that I've been asking a lot of bands that are part of the fest is this: What do you think you'll be able to bring to the fest that other bands won't be able to?

Claus - "Some of the very special Kurt and Claus kick ass energy. We're not really an act, we're 'us'. No fancy makeup, acting or costumes, just us."

I know that you're the solo member of Leaether Strip, however, are you going to have live support on stage, or will it just be yourself?

Claus - "I will as always have my husband Kurt with me on stage on the keyboards, so I can roam around freely on stage like the village nut."

Is there anything special you're planning on kicking out at Alt-Fest?

Claus - "I always try to put in a surprise here and there at special events like this, but I'm not telling you now."

And, finally, the interview is done. I want to personally thank you here, however, do you have anything else you wish to say here and now?

Claus - "Thanks for your time and great questions. All I gotta say is thanks for your support to the scene and I hope to see some of you out there at our shows. Hugs Claus."
Leaether Strip interview
March 26, 2014
Brutal Resonance

Leaether Strip

Mar 2014
With Leaether Strip on the roster for Alt-Fest (find out more and buy tickets here: http://alt-fest.com/) , and with his recent release just having been put out this month, I took the time to have a lengthy discussion with the classic act about the history of the act, as well as his presence at Alt-Fest. Check it out!

Alright, I definitely want to go all the way back with the history of Leaether Strip. You have been around for a pretty long time. Officially speaking, you're first album was released in 1990. However, there have been demos afloat from '82 and '84. When did you really first start dabbling in electronic music?

Claus - "I bought my first Synth, a Moog Prodigy, in 82 after attending a concert with the Swedish band Twice a man. By some freak chance, the keyboard player from the support act was attending the same highschool as me, so he invited me home to see his studio, and he sold me the Moog, and started to learn me the basics, and I practiced learning basslines from Fad Gadget's first album."

And, also, to expand on that last question, why did you pick electronic music as an outlet for expression? Were you influenced by other artists, amazed by the sheer amount of possibilities within the genre, or did you just go with it out of the blue?

Claus - "I knew about electronic bands like J.M Jarre and Kraftwerk and I liked it, but back in the late 70's I was a teen punk only into Punk rock really, and one day I bought a 7" single placed in the punk section, only because I liked the cover art, and that was Fad Gadget's 'Back to nature' single, and then I was totally blown away, and my love for synth music started."

Which album of yours would you consider your breakthrough? And was it because it got you signed to a label, or was it just because the album had you saying, "This is why I want to create music."

Claus - "My debut 12" single 'Japanese bodies / Battleground' became an instant hit in the German electro clubs so I guess you can say that was my breakthrough, but the one that really opened doors and the album which has a big part in me still being around in the scene was "Solitary Confinement", this album changed my life. I already knew back in 82-83 that my future would have to be in the music scene in some form. I'm sure I would still be writing songs even if I never had a record deal, it's such a big part of me and I need that release to stay sane."

Now, I know you were signed to the Zoth Ommog record label for a while in the 90s, however, the label went under soon enough. Did you feel saddened by the death of a label that you once considered home? Or did you not think on it too much?

Claus - "Yes, very, but the worst thing was finding out that the people at the label who I considered to be close family, wasn't my family at all, and that was the main reason for my massive depression that lasted 5 years and a huge financial loss plus I lost my whole backcatalouge stock, which is still being sold by some of the assholes who stole it online. I had to put it behind me to get over it, and I hope karma gets them in the end, they really deserve it."

I know that your project has changed course in sound at a few points or another such as in '94 when you released "Serenade for the Dead", which can be considered a concept album. Since then, however, you sort of went back to using dance elements. Do you change things up to be experimental? Or is it just so you don't get bored? Or, even, in the slightest, is it so your fans can always look for something new?

Claus - "'Serenade for the dead' and 'Serenade for the dead II' are not concept albums, at least I wont call them that. I was writing instrumental tracks even before i started Leæther Strip. I'm a big fan of many movie soundtracks and a collector too, and it's always been a huge inspiration source for me.

I have always been writing songs in different styles, from the very melodic to the very dark and harsh stuff. Writing music has never bored me one bit ever, sure there have been times when I need a few weeks away from the studio, but that's very rare, I'm always playing with ideas in my head for the next song. For me a good album needs to feel like a journey and I hate albums where every song sounds like it was made in the same day, my goal has always been to create something people can pull out in 50 years and still find it interesting because a well written song is timeless."

And then between '94 and '00, you were pretty silent aside from a tribute release to Soft Cell. What went on during that period? Was there a personal struggle, or were you working on a different release?

Claus - "I think you mean from 97 to 00. I released 'Self inflicted' end 97 and that was my 2nd biggest selling album after 'Solitary Confinement', and then the Zoth Ommog troubles started, then in 2000 I released the 'Carry me' EP on the Bloodline label, but that 'relationship' was very short lived."

And, again, from '00 to '05, Leaether Strip went silent in a way. What was the cause for this? Personal? Or did you just not have any ideas frothing at your mouth?

Claus - "Like I wrote earlier, I was beaten down like a slut in the gutter by the people I considered close family, I also lost my father that year and I just lost faith in people and totally lost my desire to make music 100%, I didn't write a song in almost 5 years, and the only reason I'm still here is because Kurt, my husband, helped me through it and was there for me every step of the way. No one who I had connected with in my 11 years on Zoth Ommog, or any other label I've workd with tried to get in touch with me, none..... This business is so full of leeches and the most disgustimg people you'll ever find. I have never kissed anyone's ass in my years in the music business or sold myself cheap to please these creeps and I'm proud of that.

Only reason I'm still doing it is because it's who I am and I need it, and most of all because of all the amazing people who are following my work and coming to our concerts. It's amazing to have people around the world interested in what I sit here and create in my little studio, kinda mindblowing actually."

I know that you signed to Alfa Matrix for a while in '05. Did you approach them, or did they approach you? And why did you accept Matrix as the new home for your music?

Claus - "They approached me back in late 2004, if I was interested in writing one song for a compilation, and I was in a good mood that day and the studio was still up and everything still worked after those years turned off. And I wrote "Suicide Bombers" which also became my come-back EP. It was like opening a floodgate, the inspiration just came back right away and after a few months I had an album done, 'After the devastation'. and my depression just went away as fast as it had arrived. Music is my therapy."

While with Alfa Matrix, you released a lot of box sets of your back catalogue. Was this so fans and newcomers alike could experience all of Leaether Strip in a new age?

Claus - "Yes, and also because they were out of stock, so fans had to pay too much for them online. I then got the idea to re-write many of the songs for these box's to make it a bit more interesting for me, and also the old fans. But it's nice that the young listeners are going back to hear how the scene started out back in the day."

And then in 2011, you left the Alfa Matrix label to self-release material. But, why did you leave Matrix? Was there a dispute or an argument? Or did you just feel the need to be freed from a label?

Claus - "My plans didn't fit their plans, so I left on good terms and we are still friends. I also wanted to try to see how self-releasing would work.

Alfa Matrix treated me nice and I owe them a lot for helping me to get back into the game."

Have you given thought to signing to a new label?

Claus - "At the moment I'm working on friendly terms with the German Label Emmo.biz Records, which is run by my friend Jörg. We don't have any contracts, just a verbal agreement and I'm really happy with that. He's also into catering to the collector fans by making boxes and vinyls and stuff, and that's very important, cause they are the people who are keeping this tiny scene alive."

You are somewhat influential in your given field. And, with that in mind, did you ever think of starting up your own record label?

Claus - "Yes, but I would never do it as long as I am still releasing my own stuff, because that takes all my time, with the composing and concerts and and all that. But I love mixing/remixing for other bands and it also helps to pay the bills. Maybe one day I'll start a label."

The one reason I often enjoyed your music is just for how blunt you come off in your songs. For example, "Suicide Bombers" tackles that issue directly, which I applause. Have you ever had any controversy erupt over your music or lyrics?

Claus - "The only song that really gave me issues was "the evil in Putins eyes" from 2008 (Civil Disobedience) I still get actual death threats from mainly Russia for that one. Doesn't bother me though, it's usually homophobic idiots who didn't even bother to read the lyric. My lyrics are mostly very personal and written from my point of view, and sometimes I can be very ironic and sarcastic, too. So people are bound to misunderstand them once in a while. I read about a guy getting kicked off an American plane for having the "Suicide bombers" EP cover out on the plane before leaving the gate and the passenger behind him reported it and the poor guy was dragged off the plane, it was even on Reuters news. "

I also understand that you have your side project, Klutae. Why was this side project formed? Did the themes differ from Leaether Strip? Or is it just a different style?

Claus - "Yes, all the releases in the 90's was made under the name "Klute" but, a UK band 'stole' the name and I changed it to Klutæ, cause I was tired of people thinking that I was doing jungle techno. Klutæ was started because after 4 years of hard work on Leæther Strip I needed a little break, and it was only intended to be a one time thing, one EP and that was it, but it was such a big success and I have so much fun doing it that it would be stupid to stop. Klutæ is my 'playground', I work in a much more spontaneous way and it's more Punk/metal inspired than Leæther Strip. Sometimes it crosses over and some Klutæ songs could sound like a Leæther Strip song, but after all it's the same person behind the keys so that's bound to happen. We also did about 10 Klutæ concerts and it's a lot of fun playing these songs live too."

Your latest album was just released on March 15th, Aescapism. Did you have any themes or ideas planted in this release, or did you just go with whatever was on the top of your head?

Claus - "I never really plan anything for an album. Sometimes I pick a working title. The title for 'Æscapism' wasn't picked until the last minute, the last song I wrote for this album was 'Sanctuary' and it's about escapism, and that title just fit the whole album I thought, cause that's what I do when I write songs. I take one song, and one topic, at a time and just go with the flow and what ever inspires me. And when there is about 15 to 20 songs written, it's time for a release."

Thus far, have you received any feedback on the album? And, if so, how has the response been?

Claus - "It's only been a few days, and I'm being bombed with great reviews from fans and DJ's. I think this is so far the best response I've gotten on a new album since my 2005 come-back, so I'm very very happy. The first limited edition digi-pack version is already sold out now I heard yesterday, so it's good to feel that there is still room for this old fart in the scene."

Do review sites, such as ours, ever really matter to you when you release an album? Does it ever hurt to see a low score on one of your works? And is it uplifting to see when someone has given you a higher score?

Claus - "All constructive responses, good or bad, matter to me, and I read them all if I get to see them. I would never release anything I wasn't 100% happy with, I have never done that and never will. You can also quickly spot a lazy reviewer who hasn't really listened to the album in full and just skipped after 30 seconds on each song, and it's just one person's opinion. So as long as I feel happy with what I've released, I'm satisfied. As soon as it leaves my hand, I've got not control over it anyway. Musicians shouldn't be too alarmed by bad reviews if you ask me. Many of my all time favorite albums by other bands got very shitty reviews, so you never know until you listen yourself."

I also see that you have a sort of tour planned out for 2014. You have several stops planned all about the world; Australia, Germany, Canada, and the UK. Do you have any more plans for the year to go to different locations?

Claus - "This 'tour' has been going since my stage come-back in 2009. We thought that we'd get a few shows the first year, but the booking's haven't stopped coming in and we've played in about 29 countries now since 09. We love playing live and we'll take all the bookings we can handle, if booked we'll play anywhere we're wanted. In May we got a 14-15 gig USA tour (and one in Canada) too. We toured the USA last July and it as so amazing that we wanted to return fast."

The one festival that I really want to crack down with you would be Alt-Fest. It's a new festival, and it's garnering up to be one of the bigger fests in the alternative scene. What are your thoughts on the festival? Is there too much hype, too little, or just enough?

Claus - "Yep, we can't wait for Alt-fest. I think it's about time someone tried to set up an Alternative festival of this magnitude in the UK, and what a line-up it is. I love the fact that it's crowd funded, and that just proves to me that the scene is far from dead, and more power to the people behind this for having the balls to do this. I know there is a lot of 'haters' who think it will never take place, but guess what, it will, there is not a doubt in my mind. We're very proud to be a part of it. Why shouldn't there be hype? There should be a lot more hype if you ask me, and where are the people with these kinds of 'balls' in the USA? America needs a festival like this and I'm sure it could be done if it's done in the same way as Alt-fest is done."

You'll be playing all three days at the fest, from August 15th to the 17th. Are you going to be pulling your whole catalog out to keep the show fresh, or are you going to be focusing on your newest material to promote your new endeavors?

Claus - "Nope we're only playing Sunday my friend. But we'll be there watching bands for the whole festival. I didn't make the set yet, but I think it will be like a 'best of' set."

Now, apart from just being at the fest yourself, are there any other bands that you're looking forward to meeting or seeing play live?

Claus - "I will be running around like a mad man trying to catch as many bands as possible. But the one you'll find me at from start to finish is Gary Numan."

One question that I've been asking a lot of bands that are part of the fest is this: What do you think you'll be able to bring to the fest that other bands won't be able to?

Claus - "Some of the very special Kurt and Claus kick ass energy. We're not really an act, we're 'us'. No fancy makeup, acting or costumes, just us."

I know that you're the solo member of Leaether Strip, however, are you going to have live support on stage, or will it just be yourself?

Claus - "I will as always have my husband Kurt with me on stage on the keyboards, so I can roam around freely on stage like the village nut."

Is there anything special you're planning on kicking out at Alt-Fest?

Claus - "I always try to put in a surprise here and there at special events like this, but I'm not telling you now."

And, finally, the interview is done. I want to personally thank you here, however, do you have anything else you wish to say here and now?

Claus - "Thanks for your time and great questions. All I gotta say is thanks for your support to the scene and I hope to see some of you out there at our shows. Hugs Claus."
Mar 26 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Leaether Strip

Interview, Jun 06 2009

Invoke The Insult - 'Xposed'

Review, Mar 01 2011

Fearpassage - 'Our Children'

Review, Apr 19 2013

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016