Dead Animal Assembly Plant - Old Fashion Hellfire
Industrial Metal The night is young but there is a savage, bloodthirsty smell in the air. Three dumb and drunk teens stumble upon the Sweet Meats Slaughterhouse which was opened by the legendary butcher Wilhelm Schröder in 1895. An ill fated disease in 1915 struck all the livestock, and like a tragedy out of Soylent Green, Schröder butchered the townsfolk to satisfy their hunger. When it was found out what he was doing, the angry and betrayed townsfolk fed Schröder to his own meat machines. Since then, the slaughterhouse has been all but dead and quiet...Until now. As these drunk teens walk into the slaughterhouse, they are met with a vicious onslaught of industrial metal kicks from the new butchers, Dead Animal Assembly Plant, who will all being dining on their flesh tonight. 

That is, at least, how the tale goes. Rumors also have it that this ravenous band of metal infused cannibal butchers have just released a conglomeration of sounds straight from Sweet Meats called Old Fashion Hellfire. How this album arrived on my doorstep (and whether or not I'm being threatened by a lad clad in bloodstained clothes wielding an already gore ridden chainsaw will not be mentioned) will not be revealed; all you need to understand is that Old Fashion Hellfire calls back to old fashioned industrial metal in the vein of KMFDM and Ministry. 


The cover art is a joy to look at itself. There is a very punk/rockabilly, DIY yourself feel about it with a black and white aesthetic covering it all. The eye in the sky watches all witha  moon right underneath it, while a demonic skeletal Hellfire preacher summons imps and minions from a graveyard. What they're about to do or why is unknown, all I know is that I do not want to be near or around them. 

The entire album is a thrill ride, but there are select tracks that stood out to me more than the others. For starters, the title track 'Old Fashion Hellfire' just sets the mood for the rest of the album. The gritty sound to the album could be mistaken for a lower production quality, but I found the sound and energy all too fitting for DAAP. Their vocals are damned good, as well; there wasn't a single point in this song, or any of the others, where I was wishing they would shut the fuck up. From sounding like Rob Zombie to the oddities and screeches performed by Marilyn Manson, they did good. 

Arguably, some of the better tracks on the album didn't necessarily go hand-in-hand with industrial metal, such as 'Be the Decay'. While there was a looping guitar rhythm on the track, the main focus was steady and kicking EBM beat. In other words, electronics took the forefront. The same could be said for 'Detestable', which is a kickass industrial song that blended experimental synth keys with almost black metal like guitar work. 

Anyway, the album ends but the story does not. The local town where Sweet Meats is located looks for their long lost sons and daughters that traveled to the desolate and ancient slaughterhouse. They look everywhere but the horrible and forbidden factory; they all know that's where they disappeared, but none will go there for fear of what they might find. Living in a life of ignorance, the townsfolk disappear back into their towns and the police cars retreat. And up on that ominous hill in which Sweet Meats rest, Dead Animal Assembly Plant looks down upon the villagers, sharpening their knives, tuning their guitars, and getting ready for their next specialty blend of meats with a dose of house seasoned industrial. 

As of right now, only a digital copy of Old Fashion Hellfire is available on Bandcamp, but physical copies are on the way, so stay tuned in to DAAP's channels for more news on that. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Dead Animal Assembly Plant - Old Fashion Hellfire

7.5
"Good"
Released off label 2016
The night is young but there is a savage, bloodthirsty smell in the air. Three dumb and drunk teens stumble upon the Sweet Meats Slaughterhouse which was opened by the legendary butcher Wilhelm Schröder in 1895. An ill fated disease in 1915 struck all the livestock, and like a tragedy out of Soylent Green, Schröder butchered the townsfolk to satisfy their hunger. When it was found out what he was doing, the angry and betrayed townsfolk fed Schröder to his own meat machines. Since then, the slaughterhouse has been all but dead and quiet...Until now. As these drunk teens walk into the slaughterhouse, they are met with a vicious onslaught of industrial metal kicks from the new butchers, Dead Animal Assembly Plant, who will all being dining on their flesh tonight. 

That is, at least, how the tale goes. Rumors also have it that this ravenous band of metal infused cannibal butchers have just released a conglomeration of sounds straight from Sweet Meats called Old Fashion Hellfire. How this album arrived on my doorstep (and whether or not I'm being threatened by a lad clad in bloodstained clothes wielding an already gore ridden chainsaw will not be mentioned) will not be revealed; all you need to understand is that Old Fashion Hellfire calls back to old fashioned industrial metal in the vein of KMFDM and Ministry. 


The cover art is a joy to look at itself. There is a very punk/rockabilly, DIY yourself feel about it with a black and white aesthetic covering it all. The eye in the sky watches all witha  moon right underneath it, while a demonic skeletal Hellfire preacher summons imps and minions from a graveyard. What they're about to do or why is unknown, all I know is that I do not want to be near or around them. 

The entire album is a thrill ride, but there are select tracks that stood out to me more than the others. For starters, the title track 'Old Fashion Hellfire' just sets the mood for the rest of the album. The gritty sound to the album could be mistaken for a lower production quality, but I found the sound and energy all too fitting for DAAP. Their vocals are damned good, as well; there wasn't a single point in this song, or any of the others, where I was wishing they would shut the fuck up. From sounding like Rob Zombie to the oddities and screeches performed by Marilyn Manson, they did good. 

Arguably, some of the better tracks on the album didn't necessarily go hand-in-hand with industrial metal, such as 'Be the Decay'. While there was a looping guitar rhythm on the track, the main focus was steady and kicking EBM beat. In other words, electronics took the forefront. The same could be said for 'Detestable', which is a kickass industrial song that blended experimental synth keys with almost black metal like guitar work. 

Anyway, the album ends but the story does not. The local town where Sweet Meats is located looks for their long lost sons and daughters that traveled to the desolate and ancient slaughterhouse. They look everywhere but the horrible and forbidden factory; they all know that's where they disappeared, but none will go there for fear of what they might find. Living in a life of ignorance, the townsfolk disappear back into their towns and the police cars retreat. And up on that ominous hill in which Sweet Meats rest, Dead Animal Assembly Plant looks down upon the villagers, sharpening their knives, tuning their guitars, and getting ready for their next specialty blend of meats with a dose of house seasoned industrial. 

As of right now, only a digital copy of Old Fashion Hellfire is available on Bandcamp, but physical copies are on the way, so stay tuned in to DAAP's channels for more news on that. 
Mar 26 2016

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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