SØLVE - the negative
Witch House, Tribal The name Brant Showers might be most recognized by the witch house crowd as he is one-half of the dark/occult influenced duo ∆aimon. However, today we are going to be discussing his own solo project SØLVE, which is an interesting beast to tackle with words. Wherein the base structure of SØLVE is founded upon roots from ∆aimon, elements from tribal, industrial, and neoclassical styles all merge to form Showers' personal brand of music. And just as ∆aimon was picked up by the respected Artoffact Records, SØLVE has their latest release the negative coming out on Audiotrauma on April 8th. 

the negative is a very self empowering album that will guide and help listeners come to terms with destructive energy. Anything that might disturb their life, train of thought, or general well being - whether that may be past events, dark thoughts, or traumatic illnesses - will be addressed by SØLVE through self-reflection and acceptance. Transcendence is a major theme in this album; to rise up above what you are now to become something bigger and better than ever. 

The cover art was done by Emily Steigerwald, and perhaps this too represents themes found on the album. While we cannot see the face of the person on the cover of the album, their overall position represents a distraught mind. There is an unknown black cloth/substance covering part of their mid-body to upper chest. Perhaps this blackened stain represents the sludge that holds them back (the negative). Off the left side of the cover are a few lines that look like dead and leaf-less trees. This might be the inside of the individual; while there isn't much there, it is a small bit of life that can be worked on to produce something beautiful in the end. 

The production value on SØLVE's the negative is just as good as you'll get from ∆aimon, so you need not worry about anything on that front. The song structure on the album is extremely varied. For example, the first song on the album 'the negative (perspective 1)' takes the dragging beats of witch house and blends it with a little atmospheric ambiance, while the track right after 'what remains' is a dark electro/tribal hybrid. 

However, tracks such as 'amor vacui' are what impressed me the most on the album. A low, heavy rumble slowly builds a heartbeat as if something great is about to awaken. Synths soon come in to accompany the rhythm, and a slowly paced, witchy rhythm follows with Showers' voice singing along. Another break occurs where the rumble comes back, only to be followed by another electronic segment where Showers sings once more. 'the negative (perspective 2)' was also a keeper; piano and violin clash with a moving electronic beat. This is where neoclassical influences collide with SØLVE's sound. 

But, since I've had my say and I don't wish to occupy time or space anymore, SØLVE's the negative is a powerful album that may not completely push someone to revelation, but will at least clear their head for the time they listen to the hypnotizing music. This will be pleasing for fans of ∆aimon, witch house, or experimental music in general. 
4
Brutal Resonance

SØLVE - the negative

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2016 by Audiotrauma
The name Brant Showers might be most recognized by the witch house crowd as he is one-half of the dark/occult influenced duo ∆aimon. However, today we are going to be discussing his own solo project SØLVE, which is an interesting beast to tackle with words. Wherein the base structure of SØLVE is founded upon roots from ∆aimon, elements from tribal, industrial, and neoclassical styles all merge to form Showers' personal brand of music. And just as ∆aimon was picked up by the respected Artoffact Records, SØLVE has their latest release the negative coming out on Audiotrauma on April 8th. 

the negative is a very self empowering album that will guide and help listeners come to terms with destructive energy. Anything that might disturb their life, train of thought, or general well being - whether that may be past events, dark thoughts, or traumatic illnesses - will be addressed by SØLVE through self-reflection and acceptance. Transcendence is a major theme in this album; to rise up above what you are now to become something bigger and better than ever. 

The cover art was done by Emily Steigerwald, and perhaps this too represents themes found on the album. While we cannot see the face of the person on the cover of the album, their overall position represents a distraught mind. There is an unknown black cloth/substance covering part of their mid-body to upper chest. Perhaps this blackened stain represents the sludge that holds them back (the negative). Off the left side of the cover are a few lines that look like dead and leaf-less trees. This might be the inside of the individual; while there isn't much there, it is a small bit of life that can be worked on to produce something beautiful in the end. 

The production value on SØLVE's the negative is just as good as you'll get from ∆aimon, so you need not worry about anything on that front. The song structure on the album is extremely varied. For example, the first song on the album 'the negative (perspective 1)' takes the dragging beats of witch house and blends it with a little atmospheric ambiance, while the track right after 'what remains' is a dark electro/tribal hybrid. 

However, tracks such as 'amor vacui' are what impressed me the most on the album. A low, heavy rumble slowly builds a heartbeat as if something great is about to awaken. Synths soon come in to accompany the rhythm, and a slowly paced, witchy rhythm follows with Showers' voice singing along. Another break occurs where the rumble comes back, only to be followed by another electronic segment where Showers sings once more. 'the negative (perspective 2)' was also a keeper; piano and violin clash with a moving electronic beat. This is where neoclassical influences collide with SØLVE's sound. 

But, since I've had my say and I don't wish to occupy time or space anymore, SØLVE's the negative is a powerful album that may not completely push someone to revelation, but will at least clear their head for the time they listen to the hypnotizing music. This will be pleasing for fans of ∆aimon, witch house, or experimental music in general. 
Mar 26 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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