Various Artists - Evil Sinema Vol. 3
Other As with most people, horror films hold a special place in my heart. Blood, gore, the terror of young, kinky, drunk and possibly high teenagers unknowingly about to be slaughtered just brings me joy. And, well, when an album comes out that bears resemblance to the American Grindhouse through music, you know I'm going to be all over it. And, well, with all that said, Slave Indvstries Collective has brought out their third entry in the Evil Sinema series.

Now, I own both previous versions as of now, and this one is on my to get list, and it follows the same format as the previous two entries. Each song on this compilation is based off of one horror movie or another, and the cover art for the album is creepy, as well. It shows the shadow of a hand underneath a cracked screen. If I could guess, it's either someone dying and begging for help, or a zombie about to burst through a door. But, I'll leave that up for speculation.

And, once again, a lot of these artists are unknown to me. I recognize some of the names from the previous (such as VX Noir, Dead Man's Kassette, and N Y X), but some (such as Superorder, Produkt, and Gozher!) I've never even heard of. Needless to say, again, just like with volumes one and two, this album is fairly kick-ass.

The album begins off with Jeremy Lindemann's Severed, a track inspired by the cult horror anthology V/H/S. I personally own that film, and absolutely found it a blast. The track itself serves as a great opening, equaling the joy I found within the movie. You hear a TV turn on, a tape inserted into a VCR, and then get a standard warning about how the film that's about to be played will only be showed at night.

I jumped straight into the fray, and looked at VX Noir's track immediately, as I do recall loving their track on volume two. And, this one, influenced by the vampire-horror Martin, does not disappoint, giving off a slow, and jazzy like style to it. It's like that break in a horror film where two protagonists sit at a diner for a cup of coffee before all Hell breaks loose. I really liked it.

Microwaved did a pretty good job of capturing the chaos found within the controversial film Cannibal Holocaust, using dubstep influences to get down and dirty, while the rest of the electronics did their horrifying work in such an awesome manner.

And, well, there's so much to say about this compilation since it talks about so many movies, along with the music that coincides with it. I like this album a lot. Severed finishes off the album with the second half to the introductory track. It has a singular note that shifts between one pitch and another, before a girl screaming makes your heart jump and static takes up the rest of the song, along with the sounds of the tape being removed from the VCR.

And those are the songs that really stuck out to me. I enjoyed a lot of the other ones, as well, but not to the point of capturing my attention as well as the songs listed above did. I have no problem with any of the songs this time around, but I still feel as if volume two was just slightly better than this. Perhaps it's because, after listening to two other volumes of the same style of music, the novelty of it all has worn off. But, nonetheless, I love this album, and, one day, when I purchase it, it will have a nice spot on my shelf amongst the rest of my lovely CDs.
4
Brutal Resonance

Various Artists - Evil Sinema Vol. 3

As with most people, horror films hold a special place in my heart. Blood, gore, the terror of young, kinky, drunk and possibly high teenagers unknowingly about to be slaughtered just brings me joy. And, well, when an album comes out that bears resemblance to the American Grindhouse through music, you know I'm going to be all over it. And, well, with all that said, Slave Indvstries Collective has brought out their third entry in the Evil Sinema series.

Now, I own both previous versions as of now, and this one is on my to get list, and it follows the same format as the previous two entries. Each song on this compilation is based off of one horror movie or another, and the cover art for the album is creepy, as well. It shows the shadow of a hand underneath a cracked screen. If I could guess, it's either someone dying and begging for help, or a zombie about to burst through a door. But, I'll leave that up for speculation.

And, once again, a lot of these artists are unknown to me. I recognize some of the names from the previous (such as VX Noir, Dead Man's Kassette, and N Y X), but some (such as Superorder, Produkt, and Gozher!) I've never even heard of. Needless to say, again, just like with volumes one and two, this album is fairly kick-ass.

The album begins off with Jeremy Lindemann's Severed, a track inspired by the cult horror anthology V/H/S. I personally own that film, and absolutely found it a blast. The track itself serves as a great opening, equaling the joy I found within the movie. You hear a TV turn on, a tape inserted into a VCR, and then get a standard warning about how the film that's about to be played will only be showed at night.

I jumped straight into the fray, and looked at VX Noir's track immediately, as I do recall loving their track on volume two. And, this one, influenced by the vampire-horror Martin, does not disappoint, giving off a slow, and jazzy like style to it. It's like that break in a horror film where two protagonists sit at a diner for a cup of coffee before all Hell breaks loose. I really liked it.

Microwaved did a pretty good job of capturing the chaos found within the controversial film Cannibal Holocaust, using dubstep influences to get down and dirty, while the rest of the electronics did their horrifying work in such an awesome manner.

And, well, there's so much to say about this compilation since it talks about so many movies, along with the music that coincides with it. I like this album a lot. Severed finishes off the album with the second half to the introductory track. It has a singular note that shifts between one pitch and another, before a girl screaming makes your heart jump and static takes up the rest of the song, along with the sounds of the tape being removed from the VCR.

And those are the songs that really stuck out to me. I enjoyed a lot of the other ones, as well, but not to the point of capturing my attention as well as the songs listed above did. I have no problem with any of the songs this time around, but I still feel as if volume two was just slightly better than this. Perhaps it's because, after listening to two other volumes of the same style of music, the novelty of it all has worn off. But, nonetheless, I love this album, and, one day, when I purchase it, it will have a nice spot on my shelf amongst the rest of my lovely CDs. Feb 06 2014

Various Artists

Various artists is used on compilation albums. A compilation album comprises tracks which are compiled from other recordings, either previously released or unreleased.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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