Supersimmetria - Golden Ratio
Dark Ambient, Industrial Supersimmetria is a rhythmic noise and dark ambient project that doesn't try to strafe from its roots at all. What I find most appealing about this record is the fact that, as described by their label, not a single sound tries to dominate the other. The main layer on all the songs would be the atmospheric and spacial sound, wherein all the noise and notes and keys develop right around it, never trying to overtake it, but allowing everything to breathe onto you in one giant wave of soothing emotional music.

It would be extremely hard for me to go through each piece and describe them to you one by one, I can easily tell you that, but not a single track on this album has left me doubting the prowess behind it. Some of the tracks take a definite digital stance on the album, such as Fractal. The digital sounds, bit like sounds flowing over the rest of the track, serve well as a compliment to everything else, and towards the end of the track, it sounds like trickles of rain are coming down on an 8-bit platformer.

And then there are other tracks that take a more surreal standing on the album, such as the first song, Still Thinking About the Law That Regulates the Universe. The light piano work definitely takes a stand, but it's the way the synth fades in and out of the song that really takes the biggest bite of the cake. It's glorious, and I was only able to notice this on close listening. It's hypnotic, in a sense, and really captivates me.

Amongst this album are also two remixes of Ascending by Worms of the Earth and Chiasm by Aphexia. What Worms of the Earth does with Ascending is classic to their sound. Rhythmic noise dominates the song and makes it much more bass heavy. It also adds in some chanting about mid way into the song, and makes the track much more ritual like. This was fun to listen to. Aphexia takes a similar approach to their mix, making the song much more hard, and blending in a bunch of noises to make a fair track. The digital sounds added in throughout the song also are a highlight within it.

Now, if there are any complaints about this album, that would be found in songs such as Structure. I do like it, however, I feel as if there's a bit too much going on at once, either that, or the sounds just do not go well together. Wherein other songs everything blended well, this one does not do the same; everything just seems to be a bit off from one another, and was a bit ugly.

But, aside from minor problems, Supersimmetrie still managed to create a really swell album. The rhythmic noise is ear catching, and the dark ambience that serves as the foundation for all the songs is really moving. It's hard not to love this album, as it's grounded, and has a sense of direction, and never ceases to sway in its own way.
4
Brutal Resonance

Supersimmetria - Golden Ratio

8.5
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2013 by Industry8
Supersimmetria is a rhythmic noise and dark ambient project that doesn't try to strafe from its roots at all. What I find most appealing about this record is the fact that, as described by their label, not a single sound tries to dominate the other. The main layer on all the songs would be the atmospheric and spacial sound, wherein all the noise and notes and keys develop right around it, never trying to overtake it, but allowing everything to breathe onto you in one giant wave of soothing emotional music.

It would be extremely hard for me to go through each piece and describe them to you one by one, I can easily tell you that, but not a single track on this album has left me doubting the prowess behind it. Some of the tracks take a definite digital stance on the album, such as Fractal. The digital sounds, bit like sounds flowing over the rest of the track, serve well as a compliment to everything else, and towards the end of the track, it sounds like trickles of rain are coming down on an 8-bit platformer.

And then there are other tracks that take a more surreal standing on the album, such as the first song, Still Thinking About the Law That Regulates the Universe. The light piano work definitely takes a stand, but it's the way the synth fades in and out of the song that really takes the biggest bite of the cake. It's glorious, and I was only able to notice this on close listening. It's hypnotic, in a sense, and really captivates me.

Amongst this album are also two remixes of Ascending by Worms of the Earth and Chiasm by Aphexia. What Worms of the Earth does with Ascending is classic to their sound. Rhythmic noise dominates the song and makes it much more bass heavy. It also adds in some chanting about mid way into the song, and makes the track much more ritual like. This was fun to listen to. Aphexia takes a similar approach to their mix, making the song much more hard, and blending in a bunch of noises to make a fair track. The digital sounds added in throughout the song also are a highlight within it.

Now, if there are any complaints about this album, that would be found in songs such as Structure. I do like it, however, I feel as if there's a bit too much going on at once, either that, or the sounds just do not go well together. Wherein other songs everything blended well, this one does not do the same; everything just seems to be a bit off from one another, and was a bit ugly.

But, aside from minor problems, Supersimmetrie still managed to create a really swell album. The rhythmic noise is ear catching, and the dark ambience that serves as the foundation for all the songs is really moving. It's hard not to love this album, as it's grounded, and has a sense of direction, and never ceases to sway in its own way. Oct 25 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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