Project Pitchfork - Quantum Mechanics
Electro Through all the years of listening to Peter Spilles, I've never been one to know what to expect but with this latest outing it has become obvious that Pitchfork have settled on a very mechanized electronic sound. This is their third album in as many years and it does do something the previous 'Continuum Ride' did not: it brings back some of the complexity their masterpiece 'Kaskade' contained. The arrangements are still somewhat straight forward but there's a lot more going on in the songs themselves, they don't just glide along on steady beats and growling vocals. All works showcase Spilles trademark love of atmosphere and indeed, 'Quantum Mechanics' is much more epic overall. There's the return of that cosmic vastness which has been absent as of late from the band. The feel of looking up at the stars until you fall on your back trying to take it all in, and yes, these lyrics are some of Spilles most personal yet. Cut through the gruffness of how he sounds and you'll be drawn in effortlessly.

For the last two decades, I've followed what this entity does and while I don't listen much to this style of music anymore, Project Pitchfork don't disappoint. It's direct, it's stately and definitely it'll command whatever dancefloor it winds up being played on. There's just enough of a change from the last album to justify continuing to listen to what they do but compared to what usually gets played around here: this is incredibly accessible, almost to the point of sugary sweet saturation and yet the chorus' once again just nail it so perfectly. Progressions of a very classic Pitchfork vintage are uncorked and given free reign to do what they do best: put a sly smirk on my face as I listen to them because no one else but Spilles Es could write what is on this thing. The man is constantly in motion and he's penned what any other dark electro act would give their eye teeth to be able to compose.

Clearly, this one isn't going to appeal to all the fans (none of them ever do, it's always been this way) because sometimes it's like an updated version of 'Entities' with those long instrumental passages 'Inferno' contained. Regardless, I'm still on board, boys. You guys are carrying this genre on your back and unlike some of your contemporaries (Dance or Die, Front Line Assembly), you have not become stale and show no signs of slowing down. The pace of 'Quantum Mechanics' is for the most part quite break neck, vibrantly faceted in ever more nuanced hues of viscerally compelling synthetic majesty. I like the refusal to embrace the trends of late that this band adopt in their stance: there's no screaming about how evil they are, juvenile emotions or boneheaded dj "culture". Pitchfork have something to say, they always do but this time it's very emphatic and almost comes completely out of the shadows.

Almost.

Because despite the best efforts of some so-called "scene" to dumb everything down, Peter, Dirk and Jurgen have their own plans for how it's going to be from their end of things. No compromises and no pandering for attention, Pitchfork have become one of the most unique musical voices out there and perhaps just perhaps with this one they'll be able to be seen for what they are: legends.
4
Brutal Resonance

Project Pitchfork - Quantum Mechanics

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2011 by Trisol Music Group
Through all the years of listening to Peter Spilles, I've never been one to know what to expect but with this latest outing it has become obvious that Pitchfork have settled on a very mechanized electronic sound. This is their third album in as many years and it does do something the previous 'Continuum Ride' did not: it brings back some of the complexity their masterpiece 'Kaskade' contained. The arrangements are still somewhat straight forward but there's a lot more going on in the songs themselves, they don't just glide along on steady beats and growling vocals. All works showcase Spilles trademark love of atmosphere and indeed, 'Quantum Mechanics' is much more epic overall. There's the return of that cosmic vastness which has been absent as of late from the band. The feel of looking up at the stars until you fall on your back trying to take it all in, and yes, these lyrics are some of Spilles most personal yet. Cut through the gruffness of how he sounds and you'll be drawn in effortlessly.

For the last two decades, I've followed what this entity does and while I don't listen much to this style of music anymore, Project Pitchfork don't disappoint. It's direct, it's stately and definitely it'll command whatever dancefloor it winds up being played on. There's just enough of a change from the last album to justify continuing to listen to what they do but compared to what usually gets played around here: this is incredibly accessible, almost to the point of sugary sweet saturation and yet the chorus' once again just nail it so perfectly. Progressions of a very classic Pitchfork vintage are uncorked and given free reign to do what they do best: put a sly smirk on my face as I listen to them because no one else but Spilles Es could write what is on this thing. The man is constantly in motion and he's penned what any other dark electro act would give their eye teeth to be able to compose.

Clearly, this one isn't going to appeal to all the fans (none of them ever do, it's always been this way) because sometimes it's like an updated version of 'Entities' with those long instrumental passages 'Inferno' contained. Regardless, I'm still on board, boys. You guys are carrying this genre on your back and unlike some of your contemporaries (Dance or Die, Front Line Assembly), you have not become stale and show no signs of slowing down. The pace of 'Quantum Mechanics' is for the most part quite break neck, vibrantly faceted in ever more nuanced hues of viscerally compelling synthetic majesty. I like the refusal to embrace the trends of late that this band adopt in their stance: there's no screaming about how evil they are, juvenile emotions or boneheaded dj "culture". Pitchfork have something to say, they always do but this time it's very emphatic and almost comes completely out of the shadows.

Almost.

Because despite the best efforts of some so-called "scene" to dumb everything down, Peter, Dirk and Jurgen have their own plans for how it's going to be from their end of things. No compromises and no pandering for attention, Pitchfork have become one of the most unique musical voices out there and perhaps just perhaps with this one they'll be able to be seen for what they are: legends.
Aug 15 2011

Peter Marks

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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