Programmable Animal - Drepsea
Industrial Rock Welcome aboard Programmable Animal, an industrial rock outfit based in New Lenox, Illinois. This unsigned group of six began off in 2011, whereas a short demo was formed. Shortly after, the few became six in total, garnering together a group over the next year. With five men and one woman currently outlining the line up, they try to feel out depression, societal structure, and what they feel are wrongs done to innocent people. A bit of a standard, I would suppose, perhaps even a bit cliche, but the music is where the ideas and messages are brought to full fruition.

And these guys aren't too bad. With their first song coming in with the title Please, it gave out a nice texture with a light strumming and somewhat begging vocals over the sound of drums, keys, and a back-up guitar sound that was more riveting. Definitely an odd sound, but one that was nice to hear. Suffice came in next, getting more cutting and angry in both sound and singing. A bit of a move between calm singing than breaking to an outburst with a scream plays out to good effect.

Together continues forth the industrial rock sound continues on with a bit of ambient effects. Also, the keys struck in the song add a twist; and the synths within makes the song better in itself. And Assimilate definitely has a more gruesome feel to it. Away with the almost whining like lyrics, and insert more of an uncaring, shouting to the Heavens psychopath kinda voice paired with a blended mix of guitar and drum work was excellent and refreshing.

Oh, and I should also mention the bi-polar attitude of the songs. Though each one has a unique sound to itself, each track likes to fuck around in a million different ways. There's also a nice little cutting technique they use; one sound will be playing, it immediately stops, and another sound emerges. It catches me off guard, and was displayed in the next song, Within, as well (just listen around the minute and a half mark to minute fifty mark, and you'll get the idea).

This Is Your Master advances the industrial rock feel. I think the six members of the band all contributing to the overall output of the musical selection works well in their favor. Though the songs have sort of the same musical feel, each one is different in its own sense.

I really liked Fall Eye. The quieter nature of the song along with the nice electronic notes side by side made for one of the more calm songs on the album. Decent stuff right here. Though, that peace that reigned for a little over seven minutes fell through once Dark took over with more guitar oriented subtleties. Though, Vestibule really brought back the calm ego, which was nice.

Sea of Drepsea had a really nice intro drive that culminated a deep ambient pulse to it followed along with fast paced drums that led right into the minute mark which drove out guitar work. I really enjoyed that introductory note, and though it really didn't make as much of a return as it possibly could've in the song, it was lovely to hear. And, Drown in Elation finished off the album, using all the previous tactics to good technique.

And, well, this isn't a bad debut album by far. They definitely have strength in numbers, and with those numbers comes a certain creative energy that drives out a nice sound. Emerging from Illinois, don't be shocked if they soon take over the world. A bit of an exaggeration in that last sentence, but, still, keep an eye on these guys.
4
Brutal Resonance

Programmable Animal - Drepsea

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2014
Welcome aboard Programmable Animal, an industrial rock outfit based in New Lenox, Illinois. This unsigned group of six began off in 2011, whereas a short demo was formed. Shortly after, the few became six in total, garnering together a group over the next year. With five men and one woman currently outlining the line up, they try to feel out depression, societal structure, and what they feel are wrongs done to innocent people. A bit of a standard, I would suppose, perhaps even a bit cliche, but the music is where the ideas and messages are brought to full fruition.

And these guys aren't too bad. With their first song coming in with the title Please, it gave out a nice texture with a light strumming and somewhat begging vocals over the sound of drums, keys, and a back-up guitar sound that was more riveting. Definitely an odd sound, but one that was nice to hear. Suffice came in next, getting more cutting and angry in both sound and singing. A bit of a move between calm singing than breaking to an outburst with a scream plays out to good effect.

Together continues forth the industrial rock sound continues on with a bit of ambient effects. Also, the keys struck in the song add a twist; and the synths within makes the song better in itself. And Assimilate definitely has a more gruesome feel to it. Away with the almost whining like lyrics, and insert more of an uncaring, shouting to the Heavens psychopath kinda voice paired with a blended mix of guitar and drum work was excellent and refreshing.

Oh, and I should also mention the bi-polar attitude of the songs. Though each one has a unique sound to itself, each track likes to fuck around in a million different ways. There's also a nice little cutting technique they use; one sound will be playing, it immediately stops, and another sound emerges. It catches me off guard, and was displayed in the next song, Within, as well (just listen around the minute and a half mark to minute fifty mark, and you'll get the idea).

This Is Your Master advances the industrial rock feel. I think the six members of the band all contributing to the overall output of the musical selection works well in their favor. Though the songs have sort of the same musical feel, each one is different in its own sense.

I really liked Fall Eye. The quieter nature of the song along with the nice electronic notes side by side made for one of the more calm songs on the album. Decent stuff right here. Though, that peace that reigned for a little over seven minutes fell through once Dark took over with more guitar oriented subtleties. Though, Vestibule really brought back the calm ego, which was nice.

Sea of Drepsea had a really nice intro drive that culminated a deep ambient pulse to it followed along with fast paced drums that led right into the minute mark which drove out guitar work. I really enjoyed that introductory note, and though it really didn't make as much of a return as it possibly could've in the song, it was lovely to hear. And, Drown in Elation finished off the album, using all the previous tactics to good technique.

And, well, this isn't a bad debut album by far. They definitely have strength in numbers, and with those numbers comes a certain creative energy that drives out a nice sound. Emerging from Illinois, don't be shocked if they soon take over the world. A bit of an exaggeration in that last sentence, but, still, keep an eye on these guys. Jul 30 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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