Moloch - Die Isolation
Black Metal, Dark Ambient This is my first time diving into black metal/dark ambient solo project Moloch. Based in the Ukraine, this dude has been developing strict and raw black metal (the kind that sounds like it went through a grinder) shot with a healthy dose of static noise. The end result is what a lot of extreme metal heads see as art, and what a lot of other metal heads see as complete shit; you really have to love the great divide between metalheads, even if they're willing to admit that there's one or not. 

Anyway, this Ukranian musician has just had his album "Die Isolation" released via Cold Spring, which is very well known for their dives into uncommon music for uncommon people. And Moloch perfectly fits within their catalog and serves as a fine, fine talent among their entire roster. 

Now, as I said earlier, this is some bleak and forbidding black metal that really doesn't bend the rules of the genre all that much; if you've never liked Black metal before, this release will certainly not suit you. Then again, I would sometimes like to think that only cunts don't have the chops to handle the intense sound of black metal, but, then again, that could just be me being a judgmental bastard. 

Anyway, "Die Isolation" is meant to tell the tale of souls lost within the wintery woods of Carpathia, and I always love albums like this. It makes images render so easily in my head as each track goes by, slowly dissected by my brain. And, the real question remains as to whether or not this album can really conjure lovely and beautiful images of tortured souls trapped in a neverending, frostbitten mortal torment. I can proudly say that Moloch does so with ease.

'Das Uralte Verweilt Dazwischen' is a standard introductory track that offers a glimpse into the cold story the rest of the album is about to bring. 'Depressive Visionen Eines Sterbenden Horizonts' comes out and declares Moloch's intent with this album; both lo-fi guitar work will mix with spoken word style vocal delivery, as well as intense, screaming and shouting. The drums also play a part in the song, really giving it a rhythm among all the chaos. 

'Sterben Unter Der Blasse Der Unvermeidlichkeit' wasn't really a song for me; I enjoyed the few strings that were plucked alongside more of the static sounding guitar work, but it just wasn't as hypnotic or drugging as the previous song. However, 'Die Letzten Strahlen Der Sonne Verblassen in der Kalte der Apathie' was able to bring magic back. Gut wrenching screams accompany more passionate sounding music, and the whole product was well collected.

A bit of an intermission came in the form of 'Wo Der Winter Unaufhorlich Schlagt', but it wasn't anything really special and only lasted a minute before it dissipated. And, although I liked the next song, most notably the drum work involved, 'Das Leben ist wie ein verwundeter Vogel der langsam vom Himmel fällt' just felt a bit too similar in structure to previous songs. 

'Nebelwald' was a very, very nice and lovely piece, bordering the dark ambient atmosphere while toying with light guitar work. It was a good break from what's been heard throughout most of the album, and was well noted. 'E.Khu' comes off a bit more chaotic, but it's a sort of organized chaos where everything should be out of place, but it really isn't. 

And, finally, we come across the last track on the album that lasts an entire twenty two minutes, 'Abgrund Meines Wesenz'. This is a multi-phased dark ambient/drone track that honestly uses a lot of staples that are present within the genre, but I can't help but feel as if there is just one small little quip that makes it so much different from all the rest. I can't really quite put my tongue on it, but, nonetheless, this last track was extremely enjoyable in every sense of the word. 

And, oh, Moloch, how you have made a new fan out of your work. I understand that this man has been active since around 2002, and has released a BUNCH of material, so I have some catching up to do. 

In either case, if you're a black metal fan or just shopping around for something different, you can't really go wrong with Moloch. This album is also available in multiple formats; CD and Vinyl via Cold Spring, but other retailers have it in cassette format, as well. There's really something for everyone with "
4
Brutal Resonance

Moloch - Die Isolation

This is my first time diving into black metal/dark ambient solo project Moloch. Based in the Ukraine, this dude has been developing strict and raw black metal (the kind that sounds like it went through a grinder) shot with a healthy dose of static noise. The end result is what a lot of extreme metal heads see as art, and what a lot of other metal heads see as complete shit; you really have to love the great divide between metalheads, even if they're willing to admit that there's one or not. 

Anyway, this Ukranian musician has just had his album "Die Isolation" released via Cold Spring, which is very well known for their dives into uncommon music for uncommon people. And Moloch perfectly fits within their catalog and serves as a fine, fine talent among their entire roster. 

Now, as I said earlier, this is some bleak and forbidding black metal that really doesn't bend the rules of the genre all that much; if you've never liked Black metal before, this release will certainly not suit you. Then again, I would sometimes like to think that only cunts don't have the chops to handle the intense sound of black metal, but, then again, that could just be me being a judgmental bastard. 

Anyway, "Die Isolation" is meant to tell the tale of souls lost within the wintery woods of Carpathia, and I always love albums like this. It makes images render so easily in my head as each track goes by, slowly dissected by my brain. And, the real question remains as to whether or not this album can really conjure lovely and beautiful images of tortured souls trapped in a neverending, frostbitten mortal torment. I can proudly say that Moloch does so with ease.

'Das Uralte Verweilt Dazwischen' is a standard introductory track that offers a glimpse into the cold story the rest of the album is about to bring. 'Depressive Visionen Eines Sterbenden Horizonts' comes out and declares Moloch's intent with this album; both lo-fi guitar work will mix with spoken word style vocal delivery, as well as intense, screaming and shouting. The drums also play a part in the song, really giving it a rhythm among all the chaos. 

'Sterben Unter Der Blasse Der Unvermeidlichkeit' wasn't really a song for me; I enjoyed the few strings that were plucked alongside more of the static sounding guitar work, but it just wasn't as hypnotic or drugging as the previous song. However, 'Die Letzten Strahlen Der Sonne Verblassen in der Kalte der Apathie' was able to bring magic back. Gut wrenching screams accompany more passionate sounding music, and the whole product was well collected.

A bit of an intermission came in the form of 'Wo Der Winter Unaufhorlich Schlagt', but it wasn't anything really special and only lasted a minute before it dissipated. And, although I liked the next song, most notably the drum work involved, 'Das Leben ist wie ein verwundeter Vogel der langsam vom Himmel fällt' just felt a bit too similar in structure to previous songs. 

'Nebelwald' was a very, very nice and lovely piece, bordering the dark ambient atmosphere while toying with light guitar work. It was a good break from what's been heard throughout most of the album, and was well noted. 'E.Khu' comes off a bit more chaotic, but it's a sort of organized chaos where everything should be out of place, but it really isn't. 

And, finally, we come across the last track on the album that lasts an entire twenty two minutes, 'Abgrund Meines Wesenz'. This is a multi-phased dark ambient/drone track that honestly uses a lot of staples that are present within the genre, but I can't help but feel as if there is just one small little quip that makes it so much different from all the rest. I can't really quite put my tongue on it, but, nonetheless, this last track was extremely enjoyable in every sense of the word. 

And, oh, Moloch, how you have made a new fan out of your work. I understand that this man has been active since around 2002, and has released a BUNCH of material, so I have some catching up to do. 

In either case, if you're a black metal fan or just shopping around for something different, you can't really go wrong with Moloch. This album is also available in multiple formats; CD and Vinyl via Cold Spring, but other retailers have it in cassette format, as well. There's really something for everyone with "
Jun 08 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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