Marsman - Mindwarp
Synthwave, Experimental I have heard artists toss around the experimental and synthwave tags on their releases in the past like flies on shit, but I always walked away quite disappointed. What I listened to was hardly odd and different from what most other synthwave was or has been achieving; 80s influences from classic VHS movies, musicians, and soundtracks alike absolutely take control of the field. So, I always got confused by the experimental tag when the music really just sounded like standardized synthwave no matter how delightful it may have sounded. But, I think I can finally say that I now know what experimental synthwave is or should sound like thanks to Marsman. 

I do not know much about Marsman as this musician went under the radar a couple of months ago and only recently re-emerged on social media due to this release being put out via Xtraplex Records. The most I can say is that he is from the Netherlands as his Bandcamp page dictates, and has plenty of releases out as it is. However, his latest release is the finely titled Mindwarp, and this might be a release you will want to look at. 

Mindwarp flows between IDM, synthwave, and - as mentioned in the introductory paragraph - synthwave. It's like falling asleep on a bus ride while listening to 80s bound music. You fall into a hallucinatory state where psychedelic images flash through your mind and the future - whether it's bright or not - will appear before your eyes. And through this trip you will either find yourself in disturbing company or on a meditative trip. That's one of the few ways I can accurately describe Mindwarp. 


It is a six track EP that lasts just over twenty minutes with a mixture of purposefully low, over used tape like quality that mixes with clear and concise IDM beats. Slowed down and anti-rhythmic synths sweep over long forgotten fields of cloudy but passionate times. In a sense, this is music for a future that was once looks upon with fantasy and excitement, but is now looked at with regret and remorse. 

Nonetheless, as bleak and sometimes depressing as the downtempo beats within Mindwarp might make you feel, the EP is still relatively addicting to listen to. Whether or not it is just the sheer delineation from the norm or just the odd combination of genres is not really known to myself that makes this EP so addicting is dismissive. I think that just listening to the release and disassembling it as it comes along is the real beauty of this album. Marsman takes you on a broken, sonic journey through decaying neon lit city streets that reflect a not so idealistic fate, but it's a ride you'll go on no matter what. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Marsman - Mindwarp

I have heard artists toss around the experimental and synthwave tags on their releases in the past like flies on shit, but I always walked away quite disappointed. What I listened to was hardly odd and different from what most other synthwave was or has been achieving; 80s influences from classic VHS movies, musicians, and soundtracks alike absolutely take control of the field. So, I always got confused by the experimental tag when the music really just sounded like standardized synthwave no matter how delightful it may have sounded. But, I think I can finally say that I now know what experimental synthwave is or should sound like thanks to Marsman. 

I do not know much about Marsman as this musician went under the radar a couple of months ago and only recently re-emerged on social media due to this release being put out via Xtraplex Records. The most I can say is that he is from the Netherlands as his Bandcamp page dictates, and has plenty of releases out as it is. However, his latest release is the finely titled Mindwarp, and this might be a release you will want to look at. 

Mindwarp flows between IDM, synthwave, and - as mentioned in the introductory paragraph - synthwave. It's like falling asleep on a bus ride while listening to 80s bound music. You fall into a hallucinatory state where psychedelic images flash through your mind and the future - whether it's bright or not - will appear before your eyes. And through this trip you will either find yourself in disturbing company or on a meditative trip. That's one of the few ways I can accurately describe Mindwarp. 


It is a six track EP that lasts just over twenty minutes with a mixture of purposefully low, over used tape like quality that mixes with clear and concise IDM beats. Slowed down and anti-rhythmic synths sweep over long forgotten fields of cloudy but passionate times. In a sense, this is music for a future that was once looks upon with fantasy and excitement, but is now looked at with regret and remorse. 

Nonetheless, as bleak and sometimes depressing as the downtempo beats within Mindwarp might make you feel, the EP is still relatively addicting to listen to. Whether or not it is just the sheer delineation from the norm or just the odd combination of genres is not really known to myself that makes this EP so addicting is dismissive. I think that just listening to the release and disassembling it as it comes along is the real beauty of this album. Marsman takes you on a broken, sonic journey through decaying neon lit city streets that reflect a not so idealistic fate, but it's a ride you'll go on no matter what. 
Feb 01 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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