Junksista - Bad Case of Fabulous
Electro, Futurepop Alright, well, here I am again reviewing Junksista, the heavily promoted German duo from Belgian record label Alfa-Matrix. The electro-punk tendencies of the duo has not faded from their previous EP releases, and the full length album also contains elements of everything in between. Dare I say that there are influences from funk in here on some songs.

Now, the strength that lies within Junksista would be the variety of electronics they use. Sometimes it's just pure minimalism, such as in the second track, Don't Know Love. But, it works to have an almost futuristic sort of styling to it.

Diana's vocals continue to pulse through the songs. While I still think that they could use some work, her voice still goes along with the songs, sounding sexy and seducing to the ear. I have the promotional copy, and even when the watermark plays on the song saying, "You're listening to Junksista and this is a promotional copy," she still manages to sound a little seducing. But, with such tracks as Naked Wet Hot and Bad Shag, I think you need to have that type of voice.

Now, one thing that I know has been a criticism for the duo would be the lyrical content. It's very dirty and not to be taken seriously, which is fine to me. We can all appreciate a good dick joke here and there, so there's no reason why we shouldn't laugh a little when someone decides to sing about subject matters along those lines. However, the only complaint I really have about the lyrical content would be that a lot of the songs are very repetitious with their lines. I was hoping for just a bit more variation.

But, out of all the songs on the album, I think the ones that actually were a bit more heavy were the best, such as Liebe 2.0. Rather than singing in English, there were German vocals. And, really, I think Diana sounded twice better than she did when singing in her native tongue.

So, I can really put my worries at rest with this German duo. I had my doubts for a while with the releases of the EPs, and sure, some of the songs from the EP make a comeback, but for the most part, the album is fun and the beats vary up a lot, giving you plenty to dive your dirty selves into.
4
Brutal Resonance

Junksista - Bad Case of Fabulous

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2013 by Alfa-Matrix
Alright, well, here I am again reviewing Junksista, the heavily promoted German duo from Belgian record label Alfa-Matrix. The electro-punk tendencies of the duo has not faded from their previous EP releases, and the full length album also contains elements of everything in between. Dare I say that there are influences from funk in here on some songs.

Now, the strength that lies within Junksista would be the variety of electronics they use. Sometimes it's just pure minimalism, such as in the second track, Don't Know Love. But, it works to have an almost futuristic sort of styling to it.

Diana's vocals continue to pulse through the songs. While I still think that they could use some work, her voice still goes along with the songs, sounding sexy and seducing to the ear. I have the promotional copy, and even when the watermark plays on the song saying, "You're listening to Junksista and this is a promotional copy," she still manages to sound a little seducing. But, with such tracks as Naked Wet Hot and Bad Shag, I think you need to have that type of voice.

Now, one thing that I know has been a criticism for the duo would be the lyrical content. It's very dirty and not to be taken seriously, which is fine to me. We can all appreciate a good dick joke here and there, so there's no reason why we shouldn't laugh a little when someone decides to sing about subject matters along those lines. However, the only complaint I really have about the lyrical content would be that a lot of the songs are very repetitious with their lines. I was hoping for just a bit more variation.

But, out of all the songs on the album, I think the ones that actually were a bit more heavy were the best, such as Liebe 2.0. Rather than singing in English, there were German vocals. And, really, I think Diana sounded twice better than she did when singing in her native tongue.

So, I can really put my worries at rest with this German duo. I had my doubts for a while with the releases of the EPs, and sure, some of the songs from the EP make a comeback, but for the most part, the album is fun and the beats vary up a lot, giving you plenty to dive your dirty selves into. Dec 06 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
12
Shares

Buy this release

Alfa Matrix

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016