Human Decay - Credit to humanity
EBM Interesting start to the album, the first track 'Mad Wights' bears resemblance to Faithless' 'We come one', curiosity is awakened. Human Decay themselves state that they intentionally seek to mix and match between genres. This could either be a catastrophe - resulting in an album with highs and lows but no depth OR it could just be genius - say 'Credit to Humanity' falls in the latter category. 'Dolls' reeks of old Prodigy and Ohgr, with it's rap-talk-singing and vocoded samples, it twist and turns and makes for a real head banging track.

It can't be described as anything but brave to break of the first three track with the fourth 'Endless', an instrumental soothing session. It's unexpected and works surprisingly well, like having sorbet before the next course at a fancy restaurant. 'Silent submission' brings me back to the feet stomp and leaves me with a pleasurable ominous mood before entering the dance floor with the future pop dance hit 'Alienate'.

Sometimes instrumental pieces on albums tend to fall behind the tracks with singing, on 'Credit to Humanity' the music itself has so many layers and such a depth that the instrumental tracks like 'Black Sheep' and 'Follow Me' are right up there earning their place like the rest of the tracks.

'Passing By' needs to be experienced, a melancholy song that for some reason brings my thoughts to Project Pitchfork, be it the fragile yet harsh singing or the soft and disturbed melodies it is well worth to be put on repeat. 'Remember' wraps it up and forms a great finish to this great album with sighs and flute...

The album keeps me interested all through which is exiting and unusual. The tracks are very individual but the album is solid, I'll be lucky if there's anything else close to this kind of quality released in 2012. Credit to Human Decay.
5
Brutal Resonance

Human Decay - Credit to humanity

9.0
"Amazing"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2012 by Infacted Recordings
Interesting start to the album, the first track 'Mad Wights' bears resemblance to Faithless' 'We come one', curiosity is awakened. Human Decay themselves state that they intentionally seek to mix and match between genres. This could either be a catastrophe - resulting in an album with highs and lows but no depth OR it could just be genius - say 'Credit to Humanity' falls in the latter category. 'Dolls' reeks of old Prodigy and Ohgr, with it's rap-talk-singing and vocoded samples, it twist and turns and makes for a real head banging track.

It can't be described as anything but brave to break of the first three track with the fourth 'Endless', an instrumental soothing session. It's unexpected and works surprisingly well, like having sorbet before the next course at a fancy restaurant. 'Silent submission' brings me back to the feet stomp and leaves me with a pleasurable ominous mood before entering the dance floor with the future pop dance hit 'Alienate'.

Sometimes instrumental pieces on albums tend to fall behind the tracks with singing, on 'Credit to Humanity' the music itself has so many layers and such a depth that the instrumental tracks like 'Black Sheep' and 'Follow Me' are right up there earning their place like the rest of the tracks.

'Passing By' needs to be experienced, a melancholy song that for some reason brings my thoughts to Project Pitchfork, be it the fragile yet harsh singing or the soft and disturbed melodies it is well worth to be put on repeat. 'Remember' wraps it up and forms a great finish to this great album with sighs and flute...

The album keeps me interested all through which is exiting and unusual. The tracks are very individual but the album is solid, I'll be lucky if there's anything else close to this kind of quality released in 2012. Credit to Human Decay.
Mar 25 2012

Mary Slevin Sax

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

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