DVAR - El Mariil
Experimental, Neofolk The rumour that Dvar is a bunch of mental patients allowed near instruments is growing on me. Sudden changes in type of medication and dosage would explain the band's extreme changes in both genre and mood. That they are allowed to entertain the idea of being channelers of an enochian god probably says more about the mental institutions in Russia than anything else.

The one track that absolutely stands out on this album is "Nier-Paa". The songs speaks to me of heavy tranquilizers and isolation therapy. All this is achieved with a piano and a flute played in the most beauteous ways I have heard Dvar do. It is almost like a classical piece and somehow sounds familiar to me. It is close to the primal melody of peace and quiet which only nature can sing. Later in the song voices akin to Hobbit children are introduced complementing the overall mood.

Dvar has fallen into a very medievil sound this time. The vocals are almost gone which is quite surprising being the one thing that seemed to identify the band. There are vocals, they are simply not very prominent in the mix and they often only involve a few
unintelligble noises or some deranged childish laughter to back up the instruments.

The last song, N'ahaliroh Sigalii, sounds like the moaning crows of times unspoken. It is more vocal than most other tracks on the album, but who knows what the singer wants to convey when he sings in this magical language. If he was a crow I'd think him a sad one, which is also how I would describe the singing to the uninitiated.

If you know Dvar, you know Dvar. If you don't there may be good reasons to pick up this album if you are looking for something ambient that is both magical and medievil and most definitely different than what you are used to hearing. It will take you into a medievil alien dreamworld filled with magical langua ges and strange voices.
4
Brutal Resonance

DVAR - El Mariil

The rumour that Dvar is a bunch of mental patients allowed near instruments is growing on me. Sudden changes in type of medication and dosage would explain the band's extreme changes in both genre and mood. That they are allowed to entertain the idea of being channelers of an enochian god probably says more about the mental institutions in Russia than anything else.

The one track that absolutely stands out on this album is "Nier-Paa". The songs speaks to me of heavy tranquilizers and isolation therapy. All this is achieved with a piano and a flute played in the most beauteous ways I have heard Dvar do. It is almost like a classical piece and somehow sounds familiar to me. It is close to the primal melody of peace and quiet which only nature can sing. Later in the song voices akin to Hobbit children are introduced complementing the overall mood.

Dvar has fallen into a very medievil sound this time. The vocals are almost gone which is quite surprising being the one thing that seemed to identify the band. There are vocals, they are simply not very prominent in the mix and they often only involve a few
unintelligble noises or some deranged childish laughter to back up the instruments.

The last song, N'ahaliroh Sigalii, sounds like the moaning crows of times unspoken. It is more vocal than most other tracks on the album, but who knows what the singer wants to convey when he sings in this magical language. If he was a crow I'd think him a sad one, which is also how I would describe the singing to the uninitiated.

If you know Dvar, you know Dvar. If you don't there may be good reasons to pick up this album if you are looking for something ambient that is both magical and medievil and most definitely different than what you are used to hearing. It will take you into a medievil alien dreamworld filled with magical langua ges and strange voices.
Jul 07 2011

Jon Andre Lundal

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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