Cryobiosis - Inner Stasis
Dark Ambient Tackling an already visited genre and the themes that surround it, Cryobiosis shocked me a little with last year's Within Ruins. The familiar concept of a post-apocalyptic wasteland presented in the form of dark ambient music was one that had previously been analyzed on multiple occasions. However, though the recognizable scenery may have been stale, the music itself provided an engaging harmony of deep tones and darkened synths.

And this is exactly why I'm proud to be writing about Cristian Voicu's latest release, Inner Stasis. A follow up to his bygone album, he aims to continue the trademark dank, foggy, and closed in sounds that welcomes his tone. And the album commences with the naturally designated An Opening.

The water trickles in the backdrop, seasoning the mix as it advances through with clamors from long off beasts and eerie essential sounds. A nice little way to kick off the album, a slight beat appearing to accompany the thick of it all, working its way to become more than just a standard introductory track; it more or less becomes a fully fleshed tune.

Following came Into Nothingness. The silent sounds that protruded the air made for an uneasy sound as it flowed in both ears and stayed, not wanting to leave the foul nest that it had made. A drone track, for sure, but moving and spreading out into three different sections, this was another winner.

More water ensemble occurred in Deep Aquaduct earning another respectable nod. Perhaps not as fancy as the previous two, or even as drawing, but still able to hold its own. A suspense lingered in the air, able to make your heart hold waiting for something or someone to jump out and scare you. I think it was more stressing to find out that panic never came out.

Chasms flirted a lot with the synths, far off noises in the backdrop making you feel as if you're none too far off from a catastrophe. But, the place you find yourself in, this deliberate peaceful place of inner sanctum, doesn't want you wandering off into the indecency of the unknown. It's a safe haven; nor you nor the mysticism surrounding this song wants you to leave.

It would be quite nice to walk away from the album with a gift, and Souvenir may just well do that to you. However, it gives you a spiritual present, one that helps you maintain inner harmony. A very slight beat comes out to play and adds a bit of an electronic feel to the feel of the song.

Hidden Dungeons really came out to its own unique mind, having more of an electronic tone than previous married with the already well worked dark ambience now placed within the backdrop of the song. Very well done, and the drone ending served well to take the song back to roots.

Heavier and gloomier, Harrow took its spiked teeth to decimate a sense of love and unity that had formed throughout the album. Perhaps the ending bit took the track back in the right direction, but the rest of it went full force into blackened territory.

The effects in Condensation were nice, cyberpunk sounds in a taste, the piano work that was slightly present and afflicted on the song rendering out absolute beauty. A magnificent piece on this album, and one to adore within and without.

Demise' name fits fairly well; while it's not atrocious, the drone tones don't really go anywhere in the song and are bland in comparison to previous efforts. But, even then, if this is as worse as the album can become, that's absolutely alright for me, because this isn't half bad.

And, though the drone continues in Permanent Void, the change to a more static-like accent prevented it from becoming boring; rather, it breathed into it soul, and gave it a place amongst the album.

Lastly, Exit Life sold me on my way out of this album, correlating a well done piece fraught with deightful ambient pieces and drone alike. The electronic work adding a bit of spice to the few works they were available in; the piano casting out any signs of the banal lifestyle of this genre, and the multitude of sprinkled effects helped keep the songs refreshing.

Captivating and well done, Cryobiosis has delivered another album worthy of being on the Cryo Chamber label. An absolute wonder to behold, this album really comes inch to inch with the previous album. Though not necessarily succeeding it in many ways, but perhaps coming quite even to it, this album hits different notes and pitches that were prior not explored. Now touched upon, I will patiently await whatever comes in the future for his one man act. A fine release.
4
Brutal Resonance

Cryobiosis - Inner Stasis

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2014 by Cryo Chamber
Tackling an already visited genre and the themes that surround it, Cryobiosis shocked me a little with last year's Within Ruins. The familiar concept of a post-apocalyptic wasteland presented in the form of dark ambient music was one that had previously been analyzed on multiple occasions. However, though the recognizable scenery may have been stale, the music itself provided an engaging harmony of deep tones and darkened synths.

And this is exactly why I'm proud to be writing about Cristian Voicu's latest release, Inner Stasis. A follow up to his bygone album, he aims to continue the trademark dank, foggy, and closed in sounds that welcomes his tone. And the album commences with the naturally designated An Opening.

The water trickles in the backdrop, seasoning the mix as it advances through with clamors from long off beasts and eerie essential sounds. A nice little way to kick off the album, a slight beat appearing to accompany the thick of it all, working its way to become more than just a standard introductory track; it more or less becomes a fully fleshed tune.

Following came Into Nothingness. The silent sounds that protruded the air made for an uneasy sound as it flowed in both ears and stayed, not wanting to leave the foul nest that it had made. A drone track, for sure, but moving and spreading out into three different sections, this was another winner.

More water ensemble occurred in Deep Aquaduct earning another respectable nod. Perhaps not as fancy as the previous two, or even as drawing, but still able to hold its own. A suspense lingered in the air, able to make your heart hold waiting for something or someone to jump out and scare you. I think it was more stressing to find out that panic never came out.

Chasms flirted a lot with the synths, far off noises in the backdrop making you feel as if you're none too far off from a catastrophe. But, the place you find yourself in, this deliberate peaceful place of inner sanctum, doesn't want you wandering off into the indecency of the unknown. It's a safe haven; nor you nor the mysticism surrounding this song wants you to leave.

It would be quite nice to walk away from the album with a gift, and Souvenir may just well do that to you. However, it gives you a spiritual present, one that helps you maintain inner harmony. A very slight beat comes out to play and adds a bit of an electronic feel to the feel of the song.

Hidden Dungeons really came out to its own unique mind, having more of an electronic tone than previous married with the already well worked dark ambience now placed within the backdrop of the song. Very well done, and the drone ending served well to take the song back to roots.

Heavier and gloomier, Harrow took its spiked teeth to decimate a sense of love and unity that had formed throughout the album. Perhaps the ending bit took the track back in the right direction, but the rest of it went full force into blackened territory.

The effects in Condensation were nice, cyberpunk sounds in a taste, the piano work that was slightly present and afflicted on the song rendering out absolute beauty. A magnificent piece on this album, and one to adore within and without.

Demise' name fits fairly well; while it's not atrocious, the drone tones don't really go anywhere in the song and are bland in comparison to previous efforts. But, even then, if this is as worse as the album can become, that's absolutely alright for me, because this isn't half bad.

And, though the drone continues in Permanent Void, the change to a more static-like accent prevented it from becoming boring; rather, it breathed into it soul, and gave it a place amongst the album.

Lastly, Exit Life sold me on my way out of this album, correlating a well done piece fraught with deightful ambient pieces and drone alike. The electronic work adding a bit of spice to the few works they were available in; the piano casting out any signs of the banal lifestyle of this genre, and the multitude of sprinkled effects helped keep the songs refreshing.

Captivating and well done, Cryobiosis has delivered another album worthy of being on the Cryo Chamber label. An absolute wonder to behold, this album really comes inch to inch with the previous album. Though not necessarily succeeding it in many ways, but perhaps coming quite even to it, this album hits different notes and pitches that were prior not explored. Now touched upon, I will patiently await whatever comes in the future for his one man act. A fine release. Jul 18 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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