Bring Her - Bring Her
Darkwave, Gothrock There are inevitable comparisons that will be drawn when speaking of Bring Her - the one that will come up in conversation first will be Siouxsie and the Banshees thanks to Nadine's witchy vocals that decorate the album wonderfully. While I can agree with these likenesses to 70s and early 80s gothic icons I would also find it disrespectful not to classify Bring Her by themselves. Their influences are set in stone, that is for sure, but their embrace of cold synthesizers and eerie drum machines with gloomy guitars also sets them apart from both their predecessors and competitors alike. Combine that with wicked song structure and melodies that evoke imagery of Halloween and all things spooky and Bring Her's self-titled album comes out to be a damn fine gothrock and darkwave anthem. 

The lead single off of the album 'Curses Not Promises' was the song that got me hooked on the band's sound. Like the title of the song should suggest, 'Curses Not Promises' comes off as a ritual that I would spot a group of wronged beings performing in the middle of the woods on a night with a bright, full moon. This mentality of mine did not break as I went from 'Cold Moon' to 'Choos Me Move Me' to 'Unholy Awake'. Each song has a differing structure though similar in vein of one another. For example 'Flesh In Line' has a noisy theme to it and slows down in both lyrical delivery and rhythm. But there is no doubting that 'Flesh In Line' is a song made and done by Bring Her - and it's this unofficial stamp that will make them ever the more popular as music enthusiasts find out about Bring Her. 


That being said, I would also like to discuss to curve balls that found themselves on the album, starting with their cover of Poison Point's 'Osiris Temple'. While most bands are content and happy to cover songs by legends of the past Bring Her found themselves covering a song from this coldwave and EBM duo. Poison Point are recent in the sense that they began their journey in 2015 with their canon version of 'Osiris Temple' releasing in 2016 on their now sold-out record 'Motopsychold' Nonetheless, both bands vibe very well with one another in association with sound. 'Osiris Temple' does have a bit of a post-punk build to it and with the rapid drum machines and quiet guitar wall in the background it is easy to see how Bring Her brought this song to life - all with their own dark touch. 

The second song I would like to talk about - and possible one that not a soul was really expecting - would be the collaboration effort between Bring Her and self-described dirty alien techno producer War Scenes. Titled 'Held By No One', I got a vocally sample bended, rhythmic techno beat with various bouts of static ambiance whooshing in and out of the background. Oddly enough, this song fits well enough within the overall scheme of things thanks to Bring Her's embrace of synthesizers that has been apparent since their 2015 debut EP "s/t". 

It's worth mentioning as well that Bring Her went all out in delivering on their self-titled album. They have it all for fans of each and every media with cassette, CD, and vinyl versions all currently available from various outlets. The cassette is handled by Phage Tapes, the CD is done by Icy Cold Records, and the Vinyl is put out by Black Verb Records. That being said, if you're also someone who prefers to keep your music down to digital only, that's avail;able as well. All formats are available to order HERE
4
Brutal Resonance

Bring Her - Bring Her

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2019
There are inevitable comparisons that will be drawn when speaking of Bring Her - the one that will come up in conversation first will be Siouxsie and the Banshees thanks to Nadine's witchy vocals that decorate the album wonderfully. While I can agree with these likenesses to 70s and early 80s gothic icons I would also find it disrespectful not to classify Bring Her by themselves. Their influences are set in stone, that is for sure, but their embrace of cold synthesizers and eerie drum machines with gloomy guitars also sets them apart from both their predecessors and competitors alike. Combine that with wicked song structure and melodies that evoke imagery of Halloween and all things spooky and Bring Her's self-titled album comes out to be a damn fine gothrock and darkwave anthem. 

The lead single off of the album 'Curses Not Promises' was the song that got me hooked on the band's sound. Like the title of the song should suggest, 'Curses Not Promises' comes off as a ritual that I would spot a group of wronged beings performing in the middle of the woods on a night with a bright, full moon. This mentality of mine did not break as I went from 'Cold Moon' to 'Choos Me Move Me' to 'Unholy Awake'. Each song has a differing structure though similar in vein of one another. For example 'Flesh In Line' has a noisy theme to it and slows down in both lyrical delivery and rhythm. But there is no doubting that 'Flesh In Line' is a song made and done by Bring Her - and it's this unofficial stamp that will make them ever the more popular as music enthusiasts find out about Bring Her. 


That being said, I would also like to discuss to curve balls that found themselves on the album, starting with their cover of Poison Point's 'Osiris Temple'. While most bands are content and happy to cover songs by legends of the past Bring Her found themselves covering a song from this coldwave and EBM duo. Poison Point are recent in the sense that they began their journey in 2015 with their canon version of 'Osiris Temple' releasing in 2016 on their now sold-out record 'Motopsychold' Nonetheless, both bands vibe very well with one another in association with sound. 'Osiris Temple' does have a bit of a post-punk build to it and with the rapid drum machines and quiet guitar wall in the background it is easy to see how Bring Her brought this song to life - all with their own dark touch. 

The second song I would like to talk about - and possible one that not a soul was really expecting - would be the collaboration effort between Bring Her and self-described dirty alien techno producer War Scenes. Titled 'Held By No One', I got a vocally sample bended, rhythmic techno beat with various bouts of static ambiance whooshing in and out of the background. Oddly enough, this song fits well enough within the overall scheme of things thanks to Bring Her's embrace of synthesizers that has been apparent since their 2015 debut EP "s/t". 

It's worth mentioning as well that Bring Her went all out in delivering on their self-titled album. They have it all for fans of each and every media with cassette, CD, and vinyl versions all currently available from various outlets. The cassette is handled by Phage Tapes, the CD is done by Icy Cold Records, and the Vinyl is put out by Black Verb Records. That being said, if you're also someone who prefers to keep your music down to digital only, that's avail;able as well. All formats are available to order HERE
May 11 2019

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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