Michelle Carter Industrial Skynd SKYND has quickly become one of my favorite modern electronic and industrial acts. Whenever they release a new single I find myself watching and listening to the video multiple times in a row without a break. While SKYND's aesthetic is part of the attraction (I mean, come on, the make-up and costuming is always on point), the subjects within their music is based on real crimes or odd events. Elisa Lam, Gary Heidnik, Richard Ramirez, Jim Jones, Tyler Hadley, Katherine Knight, and the events of Columbine have all been sung about and analyzed through SKYND's art. What is perhaps the most captivating aspect of SKYND's music is that they are not here to worship the horrifying acts that were committed by or to these people. They are here to open up discussion about the events that occurred and how they can be stopped. One of my favorite moments from any of SKYND's music videos comes at the end of 'Columbine'. They quote George Santayana, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." SKYND's latest single takes a look at Michelle Carter, who encouraged her boyfriend Conrad Roy through text to commit suicide. Many of the lyrics within the song come directly from the text messages that were exchanged between Carter and Roy. What envelopes me every time I listen to this song is a sickness in my gut that has me asking, "Why? Who would do this?" The vocals go through a range of emotions that correspond with what's being said; from Carter being sentimental with him about the suicide to reasoning as to why it should happen. My favorite paradoxical line in the entire song is the quite simple but so effective, "I love you, now die." It's brutal but efficient and, again, hits me in the gut every time I hear it. The music is filled with dark synths that have a doom laden appeal. The drums within allow each and every beat to blast through. But the music is not danceable; it's just as emotional as the vocals and the real life situation. Several breaks are found through the track that allows the vocals to shine; it tested my own mental stability listening to the events unfold. It's a great song, well produced, and sickening - as it should be. SKYND doesn't leave the single off without a beneficial message as per normal; in the description of the music video on YouTube, they have a link to mental health resources. To that, I give them further praise. What SKYND has managed to do with this single is bring a spotlight back on a real life crime that everyone should know about. I do not believe it is my duty to tell you how to feel about the case, but I think SKYND wants fans to join in the discussion. Musically, SKYND has crafted another masterpiece in their arsenal that's as disturbing as it is addictive. I'll leave you with a quote from SKYND's Bandcamp page that simply reads, "Sometimes things happen and we never have the answer why".  550
Brutal Resonance

Skynd - Michelle Carter

9.0
"Amazing"
Released off label 2021
SKYND has quickly become one of my favorite modern electronic and industrial acts. Whenever they release a new single I find myself watching and listening to the video multiple times in a row without a break. While SKYND's aesthetic is part of the attraction (I mean, come on, the make-up and costuming is always on point), the subjects within their music is based on real crimes or odd events. Elisa Lam, Gary Heidnik, Richard Ramirez, Jim Jones, Tyler Hadley, Katherine Knight, and the events of Columbine have all been sung about and analyzed through SKYND's art. What is perhaps the most captivating aspect of SKYND's music is that they are not here to worship the horrifying acts that were committed by or to these people. They are here to open up discussion about the events that occurred and how they can be stopped. One of my favorite moments from any of SKYND's music videos comes at the end of 'Columbine'. They quote George Santayana, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." 


SKYND's latest single takes a look at Michelle Carter, who encouraged her boyfriend Conrad Roy through text to commit suicide. Many of the lyrics within the song come directly from the text messages that were exchanged between Carter and Roy. What envelopes me every time I listen to this song is a sickness in my gut that has me asking, "Why? Who would do this?" The vocals go through a range of emotions that correspond with what's being said; from Carter being sentimental with him about the suicide to reasoning as to why it should happen. My favorite paradoxical line in the entire song is the quite simple but so effective, "I love you, now die." It's brutal but efficient and, again, hits me in the gut every time I hear it. The music is filled with dark synths that have a doom laden appeal. The drums within allow each and every beat to blast through. But the music is not danceable; it's just as emotional as the vocals and the real life situation. Several breaks are found through the track that allows the vocals to shine; it tested my own mental stability listening to the events unfold. It's a great song, well produced, and sickening - as it should be. 

SKYND doesn't leave the single off without a beneficial message as per normal; in the description of the music video on YouTube, they have a link to mental health resources. To that, I give them further praise. 

What SKYND has managed to do with this single is bring a spotlight back on a real life crime that everyone should know about. I do not believe it is my duty to tell you how to feel about the case, but I think SKYND wants fans to join in the discussion. Musically, SKYND has crafted another masterpiece in their arsenal that's as disturbing as it is addictive. I'll leave you with a quote from SKYND's Bandcamp page that simply reads, "Sometimes things happen and we never have the answer why". 
Jun 01 2021

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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