Worldburners Folk, Industrial Rock Seeming The other day I got a weird, questionable look as I was listening to this EP. My friend came up the stairs and looked at me as I played it out loud on my sound system and said, "This does not sound like something you would listen to," and then he continued on his merry way. This does seem like a simple, meaningless statement in a day of my life, but it's importance will not go unmarked. It sort of shows a beauty that can be found within Seeming, which is no matter what sound they're going for in whichever song they so choose, I bet your ass you will enjoy what they are doing. "Worldburners" is the new EP from Seeming and it's a direct follow-up and crowd pleaser to their debut album "Madness & Extinction". While somehow I missed the debut album (and immediately went to listen to it as soon as I learned of its existence), I am not a person on this Earth who would miss "Worldburners". "Worldburners" comes packed with the title track, a different version of 'Goodnight London' (which originally appeared on "Madness & Extinction", a noisey song called 'My Body Is Always Screaming', and another version of 'Worldburners Unite'. Note that this review caters to the four track, 7" vinyl version that was released via Artoffact Records. To stream the complete, extended 22-track version, you can check it out over on Seeming's Bandcamp page here.Now, one thing that you do need to understand about Seeming is that they have a very folk-ish flair about them; that's immediately apparent in both lyrical content and vocal delivery on the first track, 'Worldburners Unite'. Very clean chords come through, and a sort of inspirational and epic as well as slightly rage filled speech is delivered. It was quite wonderful. But, that's not all they are; there are way too many electronics involved to strictly label them as folk. It's almost as if folk meets industrial rock in one lovely, beautiful package. But, then again, with their next song 'Goodnight London (Wireless Version)' they show off an aptitude for blending eighties sounding synthpop with their folk instrumentation and vocal work. Again, these combinations really aren't something I would expect to work out or even find myself listening to in a lifetime, but Seeming has me hooked. 'My Body Is Always Screaming' also takes care of industrial fans. The song places emphasis on harsh tones, and a thick, sludge filled wall of noise and digitally touched, grim vocals. You could say that their folk tones took a cab ride out of this song. Lastly, an electrorock oriented version of the title track hits, dubbed 'Worldburners Unite (World Gone Dark'. It was very chill, and a smooth way to end off "Worldburners". Coming off this EP, Seeming has made me a fan of their music. It's very, very rare that I dive into anything that contains the word "folk", but there's a certain charm Seeming has over the competition that makes me want to listen to their songs over and over again. Anyway, I do wish to hear more from them soon, and I swear that I will not be missing their next album when it releases. I would be stupid to do so. And so would you.  450
Brutal Resonance

Seeming - Worldburners

The other day I got a weird, questionable look as I was listening to this EP. My friend came up the stairs and looked at me as I played it out loud on my sound system and said, "This does not sound like something you would listen to," and then he continued on his merry way. This does seem like a simple, meaningless statement in a day of my life, but it's importance will not go unmarked. It sort of shows a beauty that can be found within Seeming, which is no matter what sound they're going for in whichever song they so choose, I bet your ass you will enjoy what they are doing. 

"Worldburners" is the new EP from Seeming and it's a direct follow-up and crowd pleaser to their debut album "Madness & Extinction". While somehow I missed the debut album (and immediately went to listen to it as soon as I learned of its existence), I am not a person on this Earth who would miss "Worldburners". 

"Worldburners" comes packed with the title track, a different version of 'Goodnight London' (which originally appeared on "Madness & Extinction", a noisey song called 'My Body Is Always Screaming', and another version of 'Worldburners Unite'. 

Note that this review caters to the four track, 7" vinyl version that was released via Artoffact Records. To stream the complete, extended 22-track version, you can check it out over on Seeming's Bandcamp page here.

Now, one thing that you do need to understand about Seeming is that they have a very folk-ish flair about them; that's immediately apparent in both lyrical content and vocal delivery on the first track, 'Worldburners Unite'. Very clean chords come through, and a sort of inspirational and epic as well as slightly rage filled speech is delivered. It was quite wonderful. 

But, that's not all they are; there are way too many electronics involved to strictly label them as folk. It's almost as if folk meets industrial rock in one lovely, beautiful package. But, then again, with their next song 'Goodnight London (Wireless Version)' they show off an aptitude for blending eighties sounding synthpop with their folk instrumentation and vocal work. Again, these combinations really aren't something I would expect to work out or even find myself listening to in a lifetime, but Seeming has me hooked. 

'My Body Is Always Screaming' also takes care of industrial fans. The song places emphasis on harsh tones, and a thick, sludge filled wall of noise and digitally touched, grim vocals. You could say that their folk tones took a cab ride out of this song. Lastly, an electrorock oriented version of the title track hits, dubbed 'Worldburners Unite (World Gone Dark'. It was very chill, and a smooth way to end off "Worldburners". 

Coming off this EP, Seeming has made me a fan of their music. It's very, very rare that I dive into anything that contains the word "folk", but there's a certain charm Seeming has over the competition that makes me want to listen to their songs over and over again. 

Anyway, I do wish to hear more from them soon, and I swear that I will not be missing their next album when it releases. I would be stupid to do so. And so would you. 
Jul 30 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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