Relapse Protocol: The Remixes Industrial, Electro-Industrial Planetdamage After releasing his cyberpunk influenced industrial album "Relapse Protocol", Planetdamage began work compiling a collection of remixes. As you might have guessed, that remix collection is called "Relapse Protocol: The Remixes". What it contains are seven remixes from international industrial artists as well as an in-house edit done by Planetdamage himself. With that small intro out of the way, let's dive right into the remixes. The first remix on the EP comes courtesy of Aether Pilot, a project that I believe I have never heard of before. The original song was a moody, mid-pace track. The remix does not change that at all, but rather adds in plenty of other electronic noises and samples. While not entirely unrecognizable, Aether Pilot's version of the song almost sounds as if it should have been the original version in the first place. Well done. Relapse Protocol - The Remixes EP by Planetdamage'Vex (Mk2)' is a gritty electronic track on the original album and is taken on by Spankthenun. Spankthenun delivers drum'n'bass inspired basslines that are more technical than thumpy. Mach Fox's version of 'Hi Rez Lo Life' sounds much cleaner than the original counterpart. The bass and other electronic bits mixed in pop much better. Both versions are wicked, but if I had to pick between the two, I prefer this remix. The throbbing track 'Firewalls' has Freeze Etch, another name I am unfamiliar with, attached to the remix. The original two-minute track is extended into a seven-minute and forty-two second monster. While I do enjoy the technical detail thrust into this remix, I feel as if it overstays its welcome. I think the mix could have been shortened down to four or five minutes and been fine, but listening to it for nearly eight minutes gets me a little bored. The remix from The Gothsicles can't really be compared to the original version. Aside from Planetdamage's vocals remaining within the remix, The Gothsicles gives the track a complete makeover. It's an industrial dance track with The Gothsicles usual 8bit influences. Well done! EBM project Chrome Corpse takes over 'Freeport' and gives it a lively, metallic sound thanks to raw drums. The vocals on the song are also much more distorted than their original counterpart, but it fits with how Chrome Corpse mingled the track. Another project I have never heard of, Vandalaze, makes an appearance on the album. They remix 'Firewalls' as well but keep it at a three-minute and thirty-six second length. What I also enjoyed about this remix is that they did not really deviate from the source much; it has an underground, dark techno vibe to it. It's as if I've just walked into a cyberpunk bar, seeing grim faces about, and this is the soundtrack to my visit. The final track on the album is not a remix, but the in-house edit mentioned earlier. 'Tensor (Longform)' is a three-minute and forty-five second version of the original song. I can kind of compare it to 'Firewalls', as being a darkly driven underground techno song but with less bass. I also really appreciate the bleeps and bloops added into the song, which give it further atmosphere. I can imagine this being the tune a hacker would use in a cyberpunk world as they whittle down the security from a corporation. After listening to this remix album for the past couple of weeks, I can say that I come off of it very pleased. My favorite tracks on the album are the last two, that being Vandalze's remix and Planetdamage's in-house edit of 'Tensor'. Any song that makes me think of imaginary scenarios in another world automatically go to the top of the list, and I found those two songs to be the most inspirational out of them all. Seven out of ten!  450
Brutal Resonance

Planetdamage - Relapse Protocol: The Remixes

7.0
"Good"
Released 2021 by Black Pill Red Pill
After releasing his cyberpunk influenced industrial album "Relapse Protocol", Planetdamage began work compiling a collection of remixes. As you might have guessed, that remix collection is called "Relapse Protocol: The Remixes". What it contains are seven remixes from international industrial artists as well as an in-house edit done by Planetdamage himself. With that small intro out of the way, let's dive right into the remixes. 

The first remix on the EP comes courtesy of Aether Pilot, a project that I believe I have never heard of before. The original song was a moody, mid-pace track. The remix does not change that at all, but rather adds in plenty of other electronic noises and samples. While not entirely unrecognizable, Aether Pilot's version of the song almost sounds as if it should have been the original version in the first place. Well done. 



'Vex (Mk2)' is a gritty electronic track on the original album and is taken on by Spankthenun. Spankthenun delivers drum'n'bass inspired basslines that are more technical than thumpy. Mach Fox's version of 'Hi Rez Lo Life' sounds much cleaner than the original counterpart. The bass and other electronic bits mixed in pop much better. Both versions are wicked, but if I had to pick between the two, I prefer this remix. 

The throbbing track 'Firewalls' has Freeze Etch, another name I am unfamiliar with, attached to the remix. The original two-minute track is extended into a seven-minute and forty-two second monster. While I do enjoy the technical detail thrust into this remix, I feel as if it overstays its welcome. I think the mix could have been shortened down to four or five minutes and been fine, but listening to it for nearly eight minutes gets me a little bored. 

The remix from The Gothsicles can't really be compared to the original version. Aside from Planetdamage's vocals remaining within the remix, The Gothsicles gives the track a complete makeover. It's an industrial dance track with The Gothsicles usual 8bit influences. Well done! EBM project Chrome Corpse takes over 'Freeport' and gives it a lively, metallic sound thanks to raw drums. The vocals on the song are also much more distorted than their original counterpart, but it fits with how Chrome Corpse mingled the track. 

Another project I have never heard of, Vandalaze, makes an appearance on the album. They remix 'Firewalls' as well but keep it at a three-minute and thirty-six second length. What I also enjoyed about this remix is that they did not really deviate from the source much; it has an underground, dark techno vibe to it. It's as if I've just walked into a cyberpunk bar, seeing grim faces about, and this is the soundtrack to my visit. 

The final track on the album is not a remix, but the in-house edit mentioned earlier. 'Tensor (Longform)' is a three-minute and forty-five second version of the original song. I can kind of compare it to 'Firewalls', as being a darkly driven underground techno song but with less bass. I also really appreciate the bleeps and bloops added into the song, which give it further atmosphere. I can imagine this being the tune a hacker would use in a cyberpunk world as they whittle down the security from a corporation. 

After listening to this remix album for the past couple of weeks, I can say that I come off of it very pleased. My favorite tracks on the album are the last two, that being Vandalze's remix and Planetdamage's in-house edit of 'Tensor'. Any song that makes me think of imaginary scenarios in another world automatically go to the top of the list, and I found those two songs to be the most inspirational out of them all. Seven out of ten! 
Jun 08 2021

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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