Re:Version Aggrotech, Industrial Particle Son It was back in '96 that Jared Scott first started up the industrial/aggrotech act Particle Son and, with the help of Dave Lash and Joe Williamson, the project went on to drop album names such as The Great Pushover, Unfiltered, and It's No Use. However, the '97 to '99 roster would not last too long, as the former band mates left, leaving Vex March, Jared Scott, and Nathan Malin to release their first full length album, Re:Version in 2004. And, though the album released nearly ten years ago, it's still worth quite the discussion. After the release, between '08 and '11, Nathan Malin left, his replacement Gl1tch 106 came in, and Sandi Leeper joined in on keys. With the new flesh in the band, they continued to produce their next album , Amerikan Genocide, and that's where the band is currently at. And, as I said, Re:Version was their 2004 album, and, since it never really saw coverage on the site, I suppose I'd give out some love to the album. This nine track album spanning forty six minutes hit out a decent duration of aggrotech to listen to and enjoy. Binary Opposition hit off the album to start with, static and noise mixing and mingling for the first twenty five seconds before a nice little electronic line comes in to overtake it. Soon after, the distorted chords that are so common in the aggrotech genre come out to wreck havoc, a guitar driving through with a decent drum line following. I liked the song, but it was sort of standard. Forced Entry sort of had more of an emphasis on the synth work, sounding like church organs, giving it a bit more of an epic feel. Heaven's Fall had some more normal vocals in it, still with a bit of a distorted backing to it, but eventually left for the standard distorted chords. Threa of Echoes had more of an emphasis on electronics and guitar work, while Anthem For A New Tomorrow hit faster than previous. Acrimonious Desire went back to cleaner vocals, and was slower in general. Not bad, and perhaps one of the better songs on the album. Police State kicked the pace right back up, and Hard Wired followed through with a slower, but riveting beat. I would say that the anger really hit out well with this song, as well as the synth work. The addition of piano work in the final song, Visions In Black, was a nice little card to throw in, and added a little diversity to the album. And, while I don't have much absolutely stellar to say about this album, I don't have much bad to say about it, either. I was able to get through it and enjoy it, and there was nothing to cringe over while listening to the album, but to say that it was great to me would be a lie. This album was released back in 2004, however, and since then new talent has been added to the project. And, with that said, perhaps their new album, Amerikan Genocide, will be more technically advanced and outright fun. Until then, though, check this out and form your own opinion. 350
Brutal Resonance

Particle Son - Re:Version

6.0
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2004
It was back in '96 that Jared Scott first started up the industrial/aggrotech act Particle Son and, with the help of Dave Lash and Joe Williamson, the project went on to drop album names such as The Great Pushover, Unfiltered, and It's No Use. However, the '97 to '99 roster would not last too long, as the former band mates left, leaving Vex March, Jared Scott, and Nathan Malin to release their first full length album, Re:Version in 2004.

And, though the album released nearly ten years ago, it's still worth quite the discussion. After the release, between '08 and '11, Nathan Malin left, his replacement Gl1tch 106 came in, and Sandi Leeper joined in on keys. With the new flesh in the band, they continued to produce their next album , Amerikan Genocide, and that's where the band is currently at.

And, as I said, Re:Version was their 2004 album, and, since it never really saw coverage on the site, I suppose I'd give out some love to the album. This nine track album spanning forty six minutes hit out a decent duration of aggrotech to listen to and enjoy.

Binary Opposition hit off the album to start with, static and noise mixing and mingling for the first twenty five seconds before a nice little electronic line comes in to overtake it. Soon after, the distorted chords that are so common in the aggrotech genre come out to wreck havoc, a guitar driving through with a decent drum line following. I liked the song, but it was sort of standard.

Forced Entry sort of had more of an emphasis on the synth work, sounding like church organs, giving it a bit more of an epic feel. Heaven's Fall had some more normal vocals in it, still with a bit of a distorted backing to it, but eventually left for the standard distorted chords.

Threa of Echoes had more of an emphasis on electronics and guitar work, while Anthem For A New Tomorrow hit faster than previous. Acrimonious Desire went back to cleaner vocals, and was slower in general. Not bad, and perhaps one of the better songs on the album.

Police State kicked the pace right back up, and Hard Wired followed through with a slower, but riveting beat. I would say that the anger really hit out well with this song, as well as the synth work. The addition of piano work in the final song, Visions In Black, was a nice little card to throw in, and added a little diversity to the album.

And, while I don't have much absolutely stellar to say about this album, I don't have much bad to say about it, either. I was able to get through it and enjoy it, and there was nothing to cringe over while listening to the album, but to say that it was great to me would be a lie. This album was released back in 2004, however, and since then new talent has been added to the project. And, with that said, perhaps their new album, Amerikan Genocide, will be more technically advanced and outright fun. Until then, though, check this out and form your own opinion. Sep 17 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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