The Ostrich Effect Synthpop, Electropop Ostrich Ostrich was formed as a side project in the summer of 2003, when Marcus Mattsson and Martin Eliasson met for the first time. The first official sign of life from Ostrich was a track on the compilation series "electropop" in 2009. Ostrich Effect are now part of the wonderful roster assembled by the German Conzoom Records. Now in 2012 they have released their debut album 'The Ostrich Effect', an album of 11 tracks plus "The Clown" bonus track on the limited edition CD version. We start with a warm and catchy pop tune "A Need To Believe". A quite minimal track, with a nice beat and even better clear and sweet vocals. I mean this as no slur but a great track to sing-a-long too while doing the ironing. It's just got the right tune, catchy chorus and is basically a stream of goodness. "Lukewarm" has more of a Soft Cell feel to it, rather than Depeche Mode or Erasure. Once again good vocals and lyrics, especially the very melodic chorus with typical 80s lyrics, 'I don't even like you but you love me'. It has great harmony and both the background and foreground melodies combine well with the vocals. "Lonely Ghost" features some pleasant whistling and has a Depeche Mode quality about it. As ever it's a catchy tune with a chorus to match, once again a nice beat and pleasant melody. It's good and made that way by the vocals and almost optimistic lyrics, but the music still needs to be good and this is. We continue the vintage Depeche Mode and Erasure influence in "Turn The Tide". Some good synth lines that just pave the way for the vocals. It is made to sound so simple, but therein lies it's beauty. "Es Loco" denotes a change and a more complex sound. We have got so much in here, from Kevin Godley like vocals, Dave Ball synths and other sounds that resemble something more like the 21st Century revival. But it still retains the simple beauty and charm of the previous tracks. The melody and chorus are captivating and compelling. In "Sleepy Angels" we seem to be progressing away from the more simplistic structure and nature of the earlier tracks, taking a step away albeit maybe a small one. Still retaining all the best qualities but adding to them. The synths get stronger and the feelings build up and get more intense and it's as catchy as ever. "I Am Out" is another emotional track, with good vocals and some nice synths. But somehow always sounds as if it is going somewhere and doesn't quite get there. The Erasure influence returns in "Gold, Silver & Stones", which features a very strong bass line and a catchy chorus which make it into a good dance track. Good to see the structure change somewhat and give some variation. It also reminds me of the sound of Bronski Beat/Communards with an accompanying 70s disco beat, courtesy of the Gibson Brothers or similar. "Prepare To Fall" is very Vince Clarke and to a lesser extent Alphaville, and an all round excellent sound. Another good chorus and melody to go with it, the synth lines are well written to bring out the best in the vocals. The overall style of the album continues in "Icecold Kisses", it's an innocent sound and one of beauty. The catchy melody and synths once again give out that feel good factor. This track and most of the others are like riding on a gentle wave. "Firealarm" continues the album in much the same way. It is very apparent that although a sound I find appealing along with the great harmonies and melodies, that the structure of most tracks is very much the same. They may get away with it on this album, but I don't think they will on any follow up and will need to be more innovative as on "Gold, Silver & Stones". We complete with the CD bonus track "The Clown", which ironically is a slight change of style, it has a good beat and melody but doesn't have the same polish as the rest of the album. It has a kind of Howard Jones feel to it. Conclusion In behavioral finance, 'the ostrich' effect is the avoidance of apparently risky financial situations by pretending they do not exist. The name comes from the common but false legend that ostriches bury their heads in the sand to avoid danger. Well I think for sure this 'Ostrich Effect' album is no risky financial situation to Conzoom or anyone. This is very 80s/90s synthpop, with some of the beauty of Soft Cell and OMD but the major influence appears to be Erasure in the 'Always' and' Blue Savannah' style and early Depeche Mode, in other words Vince Clarke. If you want electropop/synthpop what more could you ask for and I find this genre timeless. Some great melodic synth music and vocals to match anyone in their genre. Possibly the synthpop album of the year, but Conzoom have at least three other contenders for that title. So I am reserving final judgement on that title for now. 450
Brutal Resonance

Ostrich - The Ostrich Effect

Ostrich was formed as a side project in the summer of 2003, when Marcus Mattsson and Martin Eliasson met for the first time. The first official sign of life from Ostrich was a track on the compilation series "electropop" in 2009. Ostrich Effect are now part of the wonderful roster assembled by the German Conzoom Records. Now in 2012 they have released their debut album 'The Ostrich Effect', an album of 11 tracks plus "The Clown" bonus track on the limited edition CD version.

We start with a warm and catchy pop tune "A Need To Believe". A quite minimal track, with a nice beat and even better clear and sweet vocals. I mean this as no slur but a great track to sing-a-long too while doing the ironing. It's just got the right tune, catchy chorus and is basically a stream of goodness. "Lukewarm" has more of a Soft Cell feel to it, rather than Depeche Mode or Erasure. Once again good vocals and lyrics, especially the very melodic chorus with typical 80s lyrics, 'I don't even like you but you love me'. It has great harmony and both the background and foreground melodies combine well with the vocals.

"Lonely Ghost" features some pleasant whistling and has a Depeche Mode quality about it. As ever it's a catchy tune with a chorus to match, once again a nice beat and pleasant melody. It's good and made that way by the vocals and almost optimistic lyrics, but the music still needs to be good and this is. We continue the vintage Depeche Mode and Erasure influence in "Turn The Tide". Some good synth lines that just pave the way for the vocals. It is made to sound so simple, but therein lies it's beauty.

"Es Loco" denotes a change and a more complex sound. We have got so much in here, from Kevin Godley like vocals, Dave Ball synths and other sounds that resemble something more like the 21st Century revival. But it still retains the simple beauty and charm of the previous tracks. The melody and chorus are captivating and compelling. In "Sleepy Angels" we seem to be progressing away from the more simplistic structure and nature of the earlier tracks, taking a step away albeit maybe a small one. Still retaining all the best qualities but adding to them. The synths get stronger and the feelings build up and get more intense and it's as catchy as ever.

"I Am Out" is another emotional track, with good vocals and some nice synths. But somehow always sounds as if it is going somewhere and doesn't quite get there. The Erasure influence returns in "Gold, Silver & Stones", which features a very strong bass line and a catchy chorus which make it into a good dance track. Good to see the structure change somewhat and give some variation. It also reminds me of the sound of Bronski Beat/Communards with an accompanying 70s disco beat, courtesy of the Gibson Brothers or similar.

"Prepare To Fall" is very Vince Clarke and to a lesser extent Alphaville, and an all round excellent sound. Another good chorus and melody to go with it, the synth lines are well written to bring out the best in the vocals. The overall style of the album continues in "Icecold Kisses", it's an innocent sound and one of beauty. The catchy melody and synths once again give out that feel good factor. This track and most of the others are like riding on a gentle wave.

"Firealarm" continues the album in much the same way. It is very apparent that although a sound I find appealing along with the great harmonies and melodies, that the structure of most tracks is very much the same. They may get away with it on this album, but I don't think they will on any follow up and will need to be more innovative as on "Gold, Silver & Stones". We complete with the CD bonus track "The Clown", which ironically is a slight change of style, it has a good beat and melody but doesn't have the same polish as the rest of the album. It has a kind of Howard Jones feel to it.


Conclusion
In behavioral finance, 'the ostrich' effect is the avoidance of apparently risky financial situations by pretending they do not exist. The name comes from the common but false legend that ostriches bury their heads in the sand to avoid danger. Well I think for sure this 'Ostrich Effect' album is no risky financial situation to Conzoom or anyone.

This is very 80s/90s synthpop, with some of the beauty of Soft Cell and OMD but the major influence appears to be Erasure in the 'Always' and' Blue Savannah' style and early Depeche Mode, in other words Vince Clarke. If you want electropop/synthpop what more could you ask for and I find this genre timeless. Some great melodic synth music and vocals to match anyone in their genre. Possibly the synthpop album of the year, but Conzoom have at least three other contenders for that title. So I am reserving final judgement on that title for now. Sep 27 2012

Danya Malashenkov

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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