Break It Down Dubstep, D'n'B Mekotam Mekotam is an electronic music project focused around dubstep, drum'n'bass, glitch, and another genre that I've never heard of in my life called neurobass. I did a quick google search on it, and kind of...Sort of figured it out. Either way, the word bass is involved, so expect a lot of it. Anyway, via Blind Mice Productions, Mekotam has released a new EP titled Break It Down which features vocal talent from Chace Green, Pete Crane (co-owner of Blind Mice, one half of SHIV-R) and Amelia Arsenic. Either way, the EP starts off with the title track, Break It Down. You could say that it was good, as it definitely showcased the artist's understanding of all the elements he applies in his music production (see the above genres). However, you could also say that in the extremely wide field of electronic music that's available practically everywhere you go, this track wouldn't quite stick out, but would rather fit in nice and snuggly with all else. In short, yes, it's good for what it is, but it's lacking some sort of extra oomph to make it stick out from the pack. Anyway, Chace Green comes in on the next track titled Make Em Go Insane, and his distorted vocals paired with a slightly more stellar beat steadily caught my attention more and more as the song went on. The glitchy presentation of vocals as they mixed and reversed went well, and I especially loved the synth work that really smashed out a little after the one minute and thirty second mark. Continuing on, both Pete Crane and Amelia Arsenic joined forces with Mekotam to deliver Grinder. Crane's whispering slowly builds up alongside Mekotam's electronic gestures, when finally the bass hits and both Arsenic and Crane moan in duality. Though, aside from singing side by side at some points, Crane mainly takes the storm over with his lovely chords. That was quite alright in every sense, however, as Arsenic then comes along and steals the spotlight in Swaginator. In comparison to the mostly rough vocal delivery thus far, hearing her chords come along and shine (especially in the chorus of the song) was brilliant. Lastly, Go For The Kill is the final song on the album, and brings forth Mekotam's own distorted and toyed with vocals alongside a darker beat that downright floods the finale of the EP. Now, though the EP had a pretty boring start, I'd say that it gradually built upon its momentum and did not let its grasp loosen. Rather, it tightened around your neck as it went through and let you go just when you had enough. Kind of like erotic asphyxiation. Anyway, this is enjoyable, and I was able to enjoy it. I don't have any powerful words to finish out this review, but I will end it by saying the normal: Go and out give it a listen. Form your own opinion. 450
Brutal Resonance

Mekotam - Break It Down

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2015 by Blind Mice Productions
Mekotam is an electronic music project focused around dubstep, drum'n'bass, glitch, and another genre that I've never heard of in my life called neurobass. I did a quick google search on it, and kind of...Sort of figured it out. Either way, the word bass is involved, so expect a lot of it. Anyway, via Blind Mice Productions, Mekotam has released a new EP titled Break It Down which features vocal talent from Chace Green, Pete Crane (co-owner of Blind Mice, one half of SHIV-R) and Amelia Arsenic.

Either way, the EP starts off with the title track, Break It Down. You could say that it was good, as it definitely showcased the artist's understanding of all the elements he applies in his music production (see the above genres). However, you could also say that in the extremely wide field of electronic music that's available practically everywhere you go, this track wouldn't quite stick out, but would rather fit in nice and snuggly with all else. In short, yes, it's good for what it is, but it's lacking some sort of extra oomph to make it stick out from the pack.

Anyway, Chace Green comes in on the next track titled Make Em Go Insane, and his distorted vocals paired with a slightly more stellar beat steadily caught my attention more and more as the song went on. The glitchy presentation of vocals as they mixed and reversed went well, and I especially loved the synth work that really smashed out a little after the one minute and thirty second mark.

Continuing on, both Pete Crane and Amelia Arsenic joined forces with Mekotam to deliver Grinder. Crane's whispering slowly builds up alongside Mekotam's electronic gestures, when finally the bass hits and both Arsenic and Crane moan in duality. Though, aside from singing side by side at some points, Crane mainly takes the storm over with his lovely chords.

That was quite alright in every sense, however, as Arsenic then comes along and steals the spotlight in Swaginator. In comparison to the mostly rough vocal delivery thus far, hearing her chords come along and shine (especially in the chorus of the song) was brilliant.

Lastly, Go For The Kill is the final song on the album, and brings forth Mekotam's own distorted and toyed with vocals alongside a darker beat that downright floods the finale of the EP.

Now, though the EP had a pretty boring start, I'd say that it gradually built upon its momentum and did not let its grasp loosen. Rather, it tightened around your neck as it went through and let you go just when you had enough. Kind of like erotic asphyxiation. Anyway, this is enjoyable, and I was able to enjoy it. I don't have any powerful words to finish out this review, but I will end it by saying the normal: Go and out give it a listen. Form your own opinion. Mar 15 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
13
Shares

Buy this release

Bandcamp

Related articles

Psyclon Nine

Interview, Mar 24 2017

Com.Pulsion - 'Machines'

Review, Jan 01 2005

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016