Eat My Cult (Remastered) Industrial, Goth Let There Be Darkness Goth and industrial enthusiast Charles Richburg has been active in the scene for the past twenty years and cites NIN, Suicide Commando, and Velvet Acid Christ as influences on his music. His project, Let There Be Darkness, utilizes religious themes to express their distaste for organized religion and so much more. Though the band's career is short lived, they have recently released an EP titled "Satanic Celebrity" which contains four songs in total. I was sent in the track 'Eat My Cult' for review, so this will be the subject of today's analysis. Let There Be Darkness · Eat My Cult (Remastered)The song starts off with wonderful and punchy percussive notes alongside electronic notes that sound like they belong on the soundtrack to The Exorcist. Following this are wallops of heavy synth basslines and moody atmospheric electronics. All of this makes for extremely impressive instrumentals. However, where the track falls is within the vocals. Richburg's vocals are auto-tuned pretty hard, or at least they sound like it. He attempts to sing but his voice sounds awful in comparison with the beat. It sounds like a classic case where the music is trying to do one thing and the vocals are doing something completely different. Neither fit with one another in any sense of the word. It sounds like the beat and the vocals were made for different songs and somehow the sound engineer got it mixed up. While I can appreciate and adore the instrumental sections on 'Eat My Cult', I cannot enjoy the song due to the vocals and how out of place they are. If it weren't for that, I would be listening to and hearing a decent dark industrial ballad. Unfortunately, it falls flat. Because of this, I have to give the track a five out of ten. This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page. 350
Brutal Resonance

Let There Be Darkness - Eat My Cult (Remastered)

5.0
"Mediocre"
Released off label 2021
Goth and industrial enthusiast Charles Richburg has been active in the scene for the past twenty years and cites NIN, Suicide Commando, and Velvet Acid Christ as influences on his music. His project, Let There Be Darkness, utilizes religious themes to express their distaste for organized religion and so much more. Though the band's career is short lived, they have recently released an EP titled "Satanic Celebrity" which contains four songs in total. I was sent in the track 'Eat My Cult' for review, so this will be the subject of today's analysis. 


The song starts off with wonderful and punchy percussive notes alongside electronic notes that sound like they belong on the soundtrack to The Exorcist. Following this are wallops of heavy synth basslines and moody atmospheric electronics. All of this makes for extremely impressive instrumentals. However, where the track falls is within the vocals. Richburg's vocals are auto-tuned pretty hard, or at least they sound like it. He attempts to sing but his voice sounds awful in comparison with the beat. It sounds like a classic case where the music is trying to do one thing and the vocals are doing something completely different. Neither fit with one another in any sense of the word. It sounds like the beat and the vocals were made for different songs and somehow the sound engineer got it mixed up. 

While I can appreciate and adore the instrumental sections on 'Eat My Cult', I cannot enjoy the song due to the vocals and how out of place they are. If it weren't for that, I would be listening to and hearing a decent dark industrial ballad. Unfortunately, it falls flat. Because of this, I have to give the track a five out of ten. 

This review was commissioned through our Ko-fi page.
Jul 03 2021

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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