The Value of X Electro, Experimental Kalkulus Maths? Science? Experimental Electro just got a degree. You already get the gist of this release by the band name and album title, so let's just sit inside the vehicle and go for a ride. Our opening track this time around, 'Music 4 Machine (Stent Mix) is an ambient number not a million miles away from a Brian Eno track, grouped with IDM infused drum samples, and there's some sort of combination of Kraftwerk meets Alien Skull Paint meets Eno. Formulaic, and if all the references to Maths are intended, then Karl Heard is a genius in the making. Sampling is introduced with 'Dreamland' :- a much heavier, more urban style track that's just confusing - I like this track, but it took me a handful of listens to really understand. Clearly the long division of the CD. I think the thing to remember is that Karl Heard is an experimental artist in his comfort zone - exploring new grounds. 'Hero' enters the territory of older style Covenant, and its the cheeky variety and hints at sequencing and repetition that make the reference to Math so viable. Kalkulus, so far is two things; instrumental, and minimal. However, this is laden with elements of surprise, to the point where if one track starts to become obsolete, the excitement of discovering the others overrides it. Dividing by zero isn't an issue here. Faults and minimalism aside, Kalkulus is doing two things by the textbook. The album becomes easier to listen to, and quicker to absorb as it goes on, thus making listener focus a non-issue. In addition, just like the aesthetic suggests, the more time you spend on this, the easier it is to understand and like. 'Tangent' is a quirky ambient number, 'Manic' does exactly what it says on the tin, and i'll leave the remainder for your discovery. What then, is the value of X? Headache. Albeit, a good one. There's a test at the end. Professor Heard has written a clever, professional, and absorbing album. Getting the techno heads to like it might be the same as a surprise algebra test to a sixth form college however. 350
Brutal Resonance

Kalkulus - The Value of X

6.0
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released off label 2011
Maths? Science? Experimental Electro just got a degree. You already get the gist of this release by the band name and album title, so let's just sit inside the vehicle and go for a ride.

Our opening track this time around, 'Music 4 Machine (Stent Mix) is an ambient number not a million miles away from a Brian Eno track, grouped with IDM infused drum samples, and there's some sort of combination of Kraftwerk meets Alien Skull Paint meets Eno. Formulaic, and if all the references to Maths are intended, then Karl Heard is a genius in the making.

Sampling is introduced with 'Dreamland' :- a much heavier, more urban style track that's just confusing - I like this track, but it took me a handful of listens to really understand. Clearly the long division of the CD. I think the thing to remember is that Karl Heard is an experimental artist in his comfort zone - exploring new grounds.

'Hero' enters the territory of older style Covenant, and its the cheeky variety and hints at sequencing and repetition that make the reference to Math so viable. Kalkulus, so far is two things; instrumental, and minimal. However, this is laden with elements of surprise, to the point where if one track starts to become obsolete, the excitement of discovering the others overrides it. Dividing by zero isn't an issue here.

Faults and minimalism aside, Kalkulus is doing two things by the textbook.
The album becomes easier to listen to, and quicker to absorb as it goes on, thus making listener focus a non-issue. In addition, just like the aesthetic suggests, the more time you spend on this, the easier it is to understand and like.

'Tangent' is a quirky ambient number, 'Manic' does exactly what it says on the tin, and i'll leave the remainder for your discovery.

What then, is the value of X?
Headache. Albeit, a good one.

There's a test at the end. Professor Heard has written a clever, professional, and absorbing album. Getting the techno heads to like it might be the same as a surprise algebra test to a sixth form college however.
Oct 12 2011

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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