Aeternum Infernum Industrial, Dark Electro Insatiable Void This review was commissioned through Ko-fi. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. This is a twenty-two track collection of various songs Insatiable Void has been working on over the past four months. Therefore, there’s not really a flow to it all but rather a compilation feel. There’s original songs, collaborations, and remixes interspersed in seemingly random order throughout the entire album. While the result is mixed and the good comes with the bad, there are a few surprises to be found on “Aeternum Infernum” that make it worth at least one passthrough. I always like to state this when reviewing albums that are twenty-plus songs long. I won’t be able to cover every song on the album, but I will be able to give you a gist as to what I did and did not like about it by naming off a couple of songs that I did appreciate and others that I did not. I’m going to start the review by discussing a bunch of songs that I did enjoy. One of the more surprising tracks on the album came with ‘Never Enough’. Rather than being a straight dark electro jam like most of the other tracks on the album, we get a pretty decent synthpop beat with some decent beats and room for electro bits. The vocals are drowned out so the most I can really here from them are auto-tuned bits, but it’s otherwise a very fun dance rhythm. If Insatiable Void makes another song like this in the future, then I would recommend partnering up with a decent vocalist to really make sure the song pops even more than it already does. I had similar feelings with ‘Death of Cycle Ten’ which has a similar approach to ‘Never Enough’, with more an emphasis on atmosphere than danceable pop music. Aeternum Infernum by Insatiable VoidI heavily enjoyed ‘Crawling Chaos (Nyarlathotep)’ as well. Obviously taking influence from H.P. Lovecraft’s well-built mythos, it’s a witch house piece filled with what sounds like haunting cries, zipping trance-edged notes, and the deep beats associated with witch house and all the ominous textures that come with it. Another one of Insatiable Void’s pieces that I enjoyed comes by way of witch house with ‘Oblivious’. While it doesn’t fail to avoid the tropes of witch house, gravewave, etc., it does give off a dark and dangerous tone while sounding complete. While the instrumentation on ‘Now It’s Up To You (Insatiable Void)’ remix is relatively decent aside from some synth notes that are way too high pitched, I was not a fan of the word-by-word, copied and pasted technique they used to get Charlie Chaplin’s infamous speech from The Great Dictator into the song. Sure, they toy with Chaplin’s voice to make it deeper, but I also feel as if this was laziness at its core. Plus, the voice sample really doesn’t flow well with the song at all. I also wasn’t a fan of the follow up song which featured sh sh zombie mamba and Insatiable Void. I can basically describe the noise of this song as if someone was rubbing their hands a on microphone and then distorting said noise. It’s a rather chaotic mess with no real rhyme or reason. One of the other remixes I wasn’t too fond of was Insatiable Void’s take on noxpox’s ‘PHANTASM Polka’. I feel as if the main bulk of the song is filtered underneath a small layer of ambiance and electronic samples that do nothing other than obscure what sounds like a pretty good industrial dance track. The collaboration between Audiobake and Insatiable Void, ‘Blood Of My Enemies’, also needed some work. The song has way too much going on, and adding in the robotic, distorted vocals made the already difficult to hear sounds merge together even more than they should’ve. It’s too muddy and needed cleaner production.  I think what Insatiable Void’s biggest weakness is (as described in an email that he sent) is his focus on releasing everything that he makes or produces. However, I believe that it’s also okay to hold off tracks for a more thematic release, or to put them out to pasture once more work has been done on them. Rather than chucking them out in a random compilation such as this. As said earlier, the good comes with the bad, and if Insatiable Void can find the time to hammer down a specific style per release, then I think we’ll see refined technique and production. Six out of ten.  350
Brutal Resonance

Insatiable Void - Aeternum Infernum

6.0
"Alright"
Released off label 2022
This review was commissioned through Ko-fi. However, it bears no weight on the score or decision. All reviews are written from an unbiased standpoint. 

This is a twenty-two track collection of various songs Insatiable Void has been working on over the past four months. Therefore, there’s not really a flow to it all but rather a compilation feel. There’s original songs, collaborations, and remixes interspersed in seemingly random order throughout the entire album. While the result is mixed and the good comes with the bad, there are a few surprises to be found on “Aeternum Infernum” that make it worth at least one passthrough. 

I always like to state this when reviewing albums that are twenty-plus songs long. I won’t be able to cover every song on the album, but I will be able to give you a gist as to what I did and did not like about it by naming off a couple of songs that I did appreciate and others that I did not. I’m going to start the review by discussing a bunch of songs that I did enjoy. 

One of the more surprising tracks on the album came with ‘Never Enough’. Rather than being a straight dark electro jam like most of the other tracks on the album, we get a pretty decent synthpop beat with some decent beats and room for electro bits. The vocals are drowned out so the most I can really here from them are auto-tuned bits, but it’s otherwise a very fun dance rhythm. If Insatiable Void makes another song like this in the future, then I would recommend partnering up with a decent vocalist to really make sure the song pops even more than it already does. I had similar feelings with ‘Death of Cycle Ten’ which has a similar approach to ‘Never Enough’, with more an emphasis on atmosphere than danceable pop music. 


I heavily enjoyed ‘Crawling Chaos (Nyarlathotep)’ as well. Obviously taking influence from H.P. Lovecraft’s well-built mythos, it’s a witch house piece filled with what sounds like haunting cries, zipping trance-edged notes, and the deep beats associated with witch house and all the ominous textures that come with it. Another one of Insatiable Void’s pieces that I enjoyed comes by way of witch house with ‘Oblivious’. While it doesn’t fail to avoid the tropes of witch house, gravewave, etc., it does give off a dark and dangerous tone while sounding complete. 

While the instrumentation on ‘Now It’s Up To You (Insatiable Void)’ remix is relatively decent aside from some synth notes that are way too high pitched, I was not a fan of the word-by-word, copied and pasted technique they used to get Charlie Chaplin’s infamous speech from The Great Dictator into the song. Sure, they toy with Chaplin’s voice to make it deeper, but I also feel as if this was laziness at its core. Plus, the voice sample really doesn’t flow well with the song at all. I also wasn’t a fan of the follow up song which featured sh sh zombie mamba and Insatiable Void. I can basically describe the noise of this song as if someone was rubbing their hands a on microphone and then distorting said noise. It’s a rather chaotic mess with no real rhyme or reason. 

One of the other remixes I wasn’t too fond of was Insatiable Void’s take on noxpox’s ‘PHANTASM Polka’. I feel as if the main bulk of the song is filtered underneath a small layer of ambiance and electronic samples that do nothing other than obscure what sounds like a pretty good industrial dance track. The collaboration between Audiobake and Insatiable Void, ‘Blood Of My Enemies’, also needed some work. The song has way too much going on, and adding in the robotic, distorted vocals made the already difficult to hear sounds merge together even more than they should’ve. It’s too muddy and needed cleaner production.  

I think what Insatiable Void’s biggest weakness is (as described in an email that he sent) is his focus on releasing everything that he makes or produces. However, I believe that it’s also okay to hold off tracks for a more thematic release, or to put them out to pasture once more work has been done on them. Rather than chucking them out in a random compilation such as this. As said earlier, the good comes with the bad, and if Insatiable Void can find the time to hammer down a specific style per release, then I think we’ll see refined technique and production. Six out of ten. 
Apr 12 2022

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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