Die Welte Die Dunklen Garten Neofolk, Darkwave Hekate I really love the fact that in this modern and international world, there are some traditions respected and remembered. The old European traditions have their roots deep in past centuries and there are some people that put those in the mind of their craftsmanship. One of those bands is Hekate, which presents us its new album called 'Die Welte Die Dunklen Garten' through the label Auerbach Tontrager. Being one of the pioneers of the German neofolk scene, Hekate kept us missing their music for a long seven years, while their last album 'Goddess' was already covered with dust somewhere in 2004. During those seven years there was a lot of action around the band and not always the music-like action. Some members left and the front man Alex Menz almost closed this project of him. But the problems had been overcome and even the main voice of the band, Susanne Grosche rejoined the band to put her talent and hard work in creating the new album. So for our pleasure and relief, Hekate didn?t become a part of the history of neofolk music and bring us a new hell-of-an album where even Patrick Domiani of Rome took a part in an engineering of this masterpiece. What can be mentioned from the beginning is that on this special CD, Hekate become much more gothic and darkwave than they were on all their previous work. Even more romanticism added as I listen to the second track called ?Jardin d?Anais? which is sang in French. Ardor and amusement were gone for good as it is melancholy that took their place. The mood stays very fluid during all the album as the tempo changes all the time. Sometimes flirting with more soft Dead Can Dance side of the rhythm, like on ?In My Garden?, sometimes being cold and rigid as on ?Per Aspera Ad Astra? and sometimes almost dancy medieval like on ?Die Dunkle Wolke?. Alex and Susanne ably rule the atmosphere with their beautiful voices, exchanging the lead from track to track. The lyrics are on both German, English and French, bringing all the gamma of European traditionalism, grown on the fresh bursts of soft wind, on a sound of clear woody streams, on a gentle touch of an age-old trees. Truly one of the best albums that this hot summer could bring into my CD player, which proves that sometimes a long expectation can be worth the wait with the following result. 550
Brutal Resonance

Hekate - Die Welte Die Dunklen Garten

9.0
"Amazing"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2011 by Auerbach Tonträger
I really love the fact that in this modern and international world, there are some traditions respected and remembered. The old European traditions have their roots deep in past centuries and there are some people that put those in the mind of their craftsmanship. One of those bands is Hekate, which presents us its new album called 'Die Welte Die Dunklen Garten' through the label Auerbach Tontrager. Being one of the pioneers of the German neofolk scene, Hekate kept us missing their music for a long seven years, while their last album 'Goddess' was already covered with dust somewhere in 2004. During those seven years there was a lot of action around the band and not always the music-like action. Some members left and the front man Alex Menz almost closed this project of him. But the problems had been overcome and even the main voice of the band, Susanne Grosche rejoined the band to put her talent and hard work in creating the new album. So for our pleasure and relief, Hekate didn?t become a part of the history of neofolk music and bring us a new hell-of-an album where even Patrick Domiani of Rome took a part in an engineering of this masterpiece.

What can be mentioned from the beginning is that on this special CD, Hekate become much more gothic and darkwave than they were on all their previous work. Even more romanticism added as I listen to the second track called ?Jardin d?Anais? which is sang in French. Ardor and amusement were gone for good as it is melancholy that took their place. The mood stays very fluid during all the album as the tempo changes all the time. Sometimes flirting with more soft Dead Can Dance side of the rhythm, like on ?In My Garden?, sometimes being cold and rigid as on ?Per Aspera Ad Astra? and sometimes almost dancy medieval like on ?Die Dunkle Wolke?.

Alex and Susanne ably rule the atmosphere with their beautiful voices, exchanging the lead from track to track. The lyrics are on both German, English and French, bringing all the gamma of European traditionalism, grown on the fresh bursts of soft wind, on a sound of clear woody streams, on a gentle touch of an age-old trees.

Truly one of the best albums that this hot summer could bring into my CD player, which proves that sometimes a long expectation can be worth the wait with the following result.
Aug 07 2011

Andrew Dienes

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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