Human Frequencies Electronics, IDM Headdreamer Headdreamer is a one man project focusing on ambient music, with influences of various genres such as IDM and glitch. Based in the Slovak Republic, Rober Gajdos founded the project in 2010 in order to capture his emotions and feelings, as well as his world view, and translate all those ranging thoughts into music. Human Frequencies is his latest full length release, in which he hopes to unveil a new sound to his audience. Not shy in his use of piano, Look at the Mirror begins off the album with various samples and a nice little ambient ring running in the background. As lovely, echoing chords run faint in the background, glitchy electronics take their small turns in rampaging through the song. Breathe relaxes the theme a bit, and curates a more soothing blend of piano, IDM based electronics. Three tracks in, and a remix from Stasis Device hits. Donating their talent to Look at the Mirror, the piano music disappears, and a more epic, soundtrack like feeling is implemented into the song. Well done. The title track, Human Frequencies, plays in next, but it doesn't really differ much from the first few tracks; more choral samples, piano music, and overall electronics sounds very similar to the first two tracks that were presented. I could say this one was worth skipping. A few wobbles, and even a tribal section in Sunrise 7pm allows it to differ from the rest of the tracks presented so far, and that was welcome. I don't necessarily understand why the Huron remix of Darkland was presented before the original, but, nonetheless, it was a fair play with IDM, glitch, and overall ambience. The trademark piano keys rang in nicely. I didn't really find much of a reason to get into Gaia, as, once more, it sounded a bit too similar to previous tracks. Turbulences actually included a lyric section, but one that lasted for maybe three seconds. Which was a bit disappointing; it added something new to the mix, but other than that, the track did sound nice, but it wasn't all too attracting . You Will Burn slowed the pace, utilized more samples, and had more of an IDM ring to it. Adding more of a light hearted flair, Esoteric Sob remixed Turbulences to a decent result. We came across the original version of Darkland with the eleventh track, and it was just more of the same. Colors from Me had a very nice, slower, somewhat chiptune-ish sound to it. And that was very lovely, because, at this point on the album, it's almost as if I've seen and heard everything from this artist. Four more remixes came in from ISH, Lucidstatic, Rentip, and Basementgrrr. Each remix was well produces and all, the quality very nice, however, I didn't find much of a reason to really want to return to any of them. And, well, the album was nice sounding, however, that does not excuse the lack of creative output from the project. From the start, I was sort of awed by what Headdreamer was doing; the mixture of excellent piano chords with all the other electronic influences was spectacular. But, after track after track utilized the same format, using the same sampled out, Holy sounding chords, it became a bore. This guy has what it takes to become great, but I think a focus on making completely unique songs each time around and focusing less on remixes would do this gentleman very well. 350
Brutal Resonance

Headdreamer - Human Frequencies

6.0
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2014
Headdreamer is a one man project focusing on ambient music, with influences of various genres such as IDM and glitch. Based in the Slovak Republic, Rober Gajdos founded the project in 2010 in order to capture his emotions and feelings, as well as his world view, and translate all those ranging thoughts into music. Human Frequencies is his latest full length release, in which he hopes to unveil a new sound to his audience.

Not shy in his use of piano, Look at the Mirror begins off the album with various samples and a nice little ambient ring running in the background. As lovely, echoing chords run faint in the background, glitchy electronics take their small turns in rampaging through the song. Breathe relaxes the theme a bit, and curates a more soothing blend of piano, IDM based electronics.

Three tracks in, and a remix from Stasis Device hits. Donating their talent to Look at the Mirror, the piano music disappears, and a more epic, soundtrack like feeling is implemented into the song. Well done.

The title track, Human Frequencies, plays in next, but it doesn't really differ much from the first few tracks; more choral samples, piano music, and overall electronics sounds very similar to the first two tracks that were presented. I could say this one was worth skipping.

A few wobbles, and even a tribal section in Sunrise 7pm allows it to differ from the rest of the tracks presented so far, and that was welcome. I don't necessarily understand why the Huron remix of Darkland was presented before the original, but, nonetheless, it was a fair play with IDM, glitch, and overall ambience. The trademark piano keys rang in nicely.

I didn't really find much of a reason to get into Gaia, as, once more, it sounded a bit too similar to previous tracks. Turbulences actually included a lyric section, but one that lasted for maybe three seconds. Which was a bit disappointing; it added something new to the mix, but other than that, the track did sound nice, but it wasn't all too attracting .

You Will Burn slowed the pace, utilized more samples, and had more of an IDM ring to it. Adding more of a light hearted flair, Esoteric Sob remixed Turbulences to a decent result.

We came across the original version of Darkland with the eleventh track, and it was just more of the same. Colors from Me had a very nice, slower, somewhat chiptune-ish sound to it. And that was very lovely, because, at this point on the album, it's almost as if I've seen and heard everything from this artist.

Four more remixes came in from ISH, Lucidstatic, Rentip, and Basementgrrr. Each remix was well produces and all, the quality very nice, however, I didn't find much of a reason to really want to return to any of them.

And, well, the album was nice sounding, however, that does not excuse the lack of creative output from the project. From the start, I was sort of awed by what Headdreamer was doing; the mixture of excellent piano chords with all the other electronic influences was spectacular. But, after track after track utilized the same format, using the same sampled out, Holy sounding chords, it became a bore. This guy has what it takes to become great, but I think a focus on making completely unique songs each time around and focusing less on remixes would do this gentleman very well. Oct 08 2014

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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