So Yeah Industrial, Rock Flesh Eating Foundation It's fair to say that British Cyber-cum-Zombie punk trio 'Flesh Eating Foundation' know what they're doing. Three eclectically brilliant full-length albums preceded this EP, and their knack for tongue-in-cheek, brutal and aggressive songs, and the ability to appeal to fans of The Misfits, Horror, Punk, Rivetheads, and all things undead delivers something that is entertaining and fresh, if nothing else. 'So Yeah' marks a new 'attitude' era of the band, and in alignment with stalwart label 'Glory & Honour', there's an air of fist punching and outright refusal to conform. Just what we like here at BR! Released as both an eight-track CD, and a two track 7" Vinyl (a true rarity these days), "So Yeah", as its name states, is a final, unarguable utterance that both shocks and silences the listeners into submission - true to it's applications in every day conversation, how does one reply to such a closed and firm statement? They listen. The title track kicks off and serves as the backbone of this E.P (rightly so), and it's just such a powerful song to let out all of your rage - it's heavy, distorted bass, old school Punk vocals, and lyrics that both invoke hostility, and unleash it : "I want to kick some arse and I'm GOING to!" - It acts as the majority of the song's spoken content, and is served between noisy electronica and bass that could almost be Dubstep if it wasn't so downtuned. An excellent song for anyone in a bad mood; used heavily as a marketing campaign for the release, it's catchy and very very good at relieving tension. The second track is a remix by popular Australian act 'Angelspit'. I can't help but think of Skinny Puppy when I hear it, and it's broken down to make the chorus even more effective. The two of these together make up the Vinyl release, and the rest of this review will be discussing the CD release. 'Seed The Hate' comes with a great vocal melody and unorthodox synth effects that stir the pot just enough to make this release really interesting - I'll admit freely this isn't usually my sound, but like Dreams Divide before them, the label have once again put out something with more energy than a Fukushima Uppercut. 'Gratitude' and 'Outlast You' are a bit slower, and put a bit of Groove into the release, but for me, it's the slowed down version of the title track 'Slow Yeah', that really opens the curtains. It's REALLY slow, and by that I mean, I thought I was hearing a drone band. The T-Lab remix of 'So Yeah' makes the track traditionally Industrial, and it's very fast, absolutely laden with synth, and sounds like something Soman would put out! Finally, in a risky move, the legendary Babyland are covered on here ('Worst Case Scenario'), and it's been done at a good time - Dan has just launched the debut album by his new act 'Continues', and this cover is a great credit to an act that so many owe so much to. Available in two formats, there's something for everyone here, and if the title track doesn't appeal, the cover, slowed down version and remixes will. 450
Brutal Resonance

Flesh Eating Foundation - So Yeah

7.0
"Good"
Spotify
Released 2012 by Glory & Honour
It's fair to say that British Cyber-cum-Zombie punk trio 'Flesh Eating Foundation' know what they're doing.

Three eclectically brilliant full-length albums preceded this EP, and their knack for tongue-in-cheek, brutal and aggressive songs, and the ability to appeal to fans of The Misfits, Horror, Punk, Rivetheads, and all things undead delivers something that is entertaining and fresh, if nothing else.

'So Yeah' marks a new 'attitude' era of the band, and in alignment with stalwart label 'Glory & Honour', there's an air of fist punching and outright refusal to conform. Just what we like here at BR!

Released as both an eight-track CD, and a two track 7" Vinyl (a true rarity these days), "So Yeah", as its name states, is a final, unarguable utterance that both shocks and silences the listeners into submission - true to it's applications in every day conversation, how does one reply to such a closed and firm statement? They listen.

The title track kicks off and serves as the backbone of this E.P (rightly so), and it's just such a powerful song to let out all of your rage - it's heavy, distorted bass, old school Punk vocals, and lyrics that both invoke hostility, and unleash it : "I want to kick some arse and I'm GOING to!" - It acts as the majority of the song's spoken content, and is served between noisy electronica and bass that could almost be Dubstep if it wasn't so downtuned. An excellent song for anyone in a bad mood; used heavily as a marketing campaign for the release, it's catchy and very very good at relieving tension.

The second track is a remix by popular Australian act 'Angelspit'. I can't help but think of Skinny Puppy when I hear it, and it's broken down to make the chorus even more effective. The two of these together make up the Vinyl release, and the rest of this review will be discussing the CD release.

'Seed The Hate' comes with a great vocal melody and unorthodox synth effects that stir the pot just enough to make this release really interesting - I'll admit freely this isn't usually my sound, but like Dreams Divide before them, the label have once again put out something with more energy than a Fukushima Uppercut.

'Gratitude' and 'Outlast You' are a bit slower, and put a bit of Groove into the release, but for me, it's the slowed down version of the title track 'Slow Yeah', that really opens the curtains. It's REALLY slow, and by that I mean, I thought I was hearing a drone band. The T-Lab remix of 'So Yeah' makes the track traditionally Industrial, and it's very fast, absolutely laden with synth, and sounds like something Soman would put out!

Finally, in a risky move, the legendary Babyland are covered on here ('Worst Case Scenario'), and it's been done at a good time - Dan has just launched the debut album by his new act 'Continues', and this cover is a great credit to an act that so many owe so much to.

Available in two formats, there's something for everyone here, and if the title track doesn't appeal, the cover, slowed down version and remixes will. Jun 18 2012

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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