Worms of the Earth - Anagami
Dark Ambient, Martial Industrial Shortly before the release of the highly praised Azal\'ucel, Worms of the Earth released Anagami. The album, in itself, toys around with a lot of middle eastern sounds, while still containing within itself the project's sinister rhythmic noise that has been part of his style since the release of The Angels of Prostitution. However, what this one man band has been so successful in doing throughout the entirety of his career is being dynamic with the genres he so tackles.

Beginning off with The Angels of Prostitution, he was able to get a head start by delivering awesome and pulse pounding rhythmic noise that really turned my insides in a very nice way. Their second release coming after was The Lesser Ophidian Gate, which was extremely noise based, but still managed to make me tingle. And, even then, the album after the one that I am reviewing, their fourth release, was so good that I gave it a perfect 10 out of 10. The only one I have ever deemed worthy of that mark.

And, now, here I am, about to review their third album, and I am already impressed with the sounds that are coming out of it. There's a ton of tribal elements blended into this album, but it still maintains the harshness of the project's former escapades. And that is something that long time fans will not be upset about. This is still the sound we know and love, however, with the elements of tribal noise mixing in with the standard, we are given something new to enjoy, and also a new musical element that does not sound recycled.

My favorite track on the album would have to be 18 Hands of Cundi. It's extremely tribal, and is always moving into a new direction. There's no shortage of beats here, and even when you think that not much more can be done with the song, more is added on or changed indefinitely. The outstanding moments are when this female humming, almost sounds like a ritual, covers over the song and delivers a fascinating blow to the chest.

So, in the end, Worms of the Earth has kicked my ass once more, delivering me an awesome album that I adore a lot. I do wish I could go through this album again as of right now, however, I need to do things, and I am quite crying on the inside right now, because I do not wish to abandon music as of yet, as I want to relive through Anagami once more, and possibly become enlightened by it, just like the title explains the album.
4
Brutal Resonance

Worms of the Earth - Anagami

Shortly before the release of the highly praised Azal\'ucel, Worms of the Earth released Anagami. The album, in itself, toys around with a lot of middle eastern sounds, while still containing within itself the project's sinister rhythmic noise that has been part of his style since the release of The Angels of Prostitution. However, what this one man band has been so successful in doing throughout the entirety of his career is being dynamic with the genres he so tackles.

Beginning off with The Angels of Prostitution, he was able to get a head start by delivering awesome and pulse pounding rhythmic noise that really turned my insides in a very nice way. Their second release coming after was The Lesser Ophidian Gate, which was extremely noise based, but still managed to make me tingle. And, even then, the album after the one that I am reviewing, their fourth release, was so good that I gave it a perfect 10 out of 10. The only one I have ever deemed worthy of that mark.

And, now, here I am, about to review their third album, and I am already impressed with the sounds that are coming out of it. There's a ton of tribal elements blended into this album, but it still maintains the harshness of the project's former escapades. And that is something that long time fans will not be upset about. This is still the sound we know and love, however, with the elements of tribal noise mixing in with the standard, we are given something new to enjoy, and also a new musical element that does not sound recycled.

My favorite track on the album would have to be 18 Hands of Cundi. It's extremely tribal, and is always moving into a new direction. There's no shortage of beats here, and even when you think that not much more can be done with the song, more is added on or changed indefinitely. The outstanding moments are when this female humming, almost sounds like a ritual, covers over the song and delivers a fascinating blow to the chest.

So, in the end, Worms of the Earth has kicked my ass once more, delivering me an awesome album that I adore a lot. I do wish I could go through this album again as of right now, however, I need to do things, and I am quite crying on the inside right now, because I do not wish to abandon music as of yet, as I want to relive through Anagami once more, and possibly become enlightened by it, just like the title explains the album. Oct 22 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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