The Rabid Whole - Problems
Electrorock The Rabid Whole is an electrorock outfit that was first started by Andreas Weiss. He was one of those musicians who wasn't content with joining somebody else's band; rather, he wanted to form his own and write his own rules. Recruiting multiple members along the way, the band was soon signed to Synthetic Entertainment, wherein their 2009 album Autraumaton was released.

Following two years later, a remix album was released based on the previous' songs (remixes featured from scene veterans such as mind.in.a.box, Angelspit, Assemblage 23, 16 Volt, Kevvy Mental, along with plenty of others).

However, after a few band members left, Weiss sold his house, quit his job, and set up a new recording studio in a back-to-square-one situation. After the recruitment of new band members and the negation of all contracts from management and label companies, Refuge was finally released in 2012. The album saw enough success to warrant two years worth of touring at festivals and the such, and now we're here in 2014.

With a reputation already floating above them, they are now releasing their next EP Problems on September 23rd. And I am just that lucky of a chap to have gotten my hands on a review copy; and, without further ado, let's talk about this sensation that has captured the attention of so many others.

Don't Stop Now began off the EP, coming in with a low and slow synth line as layers of electronics come over it to a sudden stop. That fades out to a small electronic line, and soon enough we're in the midst of Chalsey Noelle's voice; though she may be considered as the backup vox, she could sure as hell slam out a song with her own powerful chords. The guitars running in with a powerful drum comes off nicely, and sure as hell when Weiss comes in singing along, the song becomes that much better.

Bound To Get Worse followed a pretty decent pattern as the last song, though I'd say there was less emphasis on electronic lines in comparison to the rock aspect. Take It All Away began off nice and slow, and catered to my tastes; I'm a fan of piano mixed with electronics, and the slow tune managed to suck me right in. The majority of the first half focused on material without guitar, while the second half brought in some more of a nice feel to it, still concerting itself in the gradual pace that cemented the track in the first place.

Patience was a bit of an interlude on the EP, serving through two minutes of electronic atmospheres; a bit of an ambient, space ring to it all. The epic sci-fi, action tone really grounded itself with the smooth guitar work that came later on in the song.

I think Nothing Is Painless was the first track that I felt as if the music was a bit overpowering in comparison to the voices that came out of it. Nonetheless, it was well done. The title track of the EP, Problems, had some wonderful and emotional acoustic set pieces within it, and was perhaps the most unique of the tracks presented, I'd say only second to Patience.

And, coming from this album, it's easy as pie to see why these guys have come off as an addiction to so many others. I did see a few flaws, such as the rock aspect in the first, second, and third songs to kind of overlap and take too many queues from one another, but those are minor complaints and nothing too rough to scratch the surface of the EP. This was a solid release, and my first go at listening to these guys. Nothing too shabby to be found here, I walk away from this release with a smile and a good heart, wishing them well on what's to come next.
4
Brutal Resonance

The Rabid Whole - Problems

7.0
"Good"
Released off label 2014
The Rabid Whole is an electrorock outfit that was first started by Andreas Weiss. He was one of those musicians who wasn't content with joining somebody else's band; rather, he wanted to form his own and write his own rules. Recruiting multiple members along the way, the band was soon signed to Synthetic Entertainment, wherein their 2009 album Autraumaton was released.

Following two years later, a remix album was released based on the previous' songs (remixes featured from scene veterans such as mind.in.a.box, Angelspit, Assemblage 23, 16 Volt, Kevvy Mental, along with plenty of others).

However, after a few band members left, Weiss sold his house, quit his job, and set up a new recording studio in a back-to-square-one situation. After the recruitment of new band members and the negation of all contracts from management and label companies, Refuge was finally released in 2012. The album saw enough success to warrant two years worth of touring at festivals and the such, and now we're here in 2014.

With a reputation already floating above them, they are now releasing their next EP Problems on September 23rd. And I am just that lucky of a chap to have gotten my hands on a review copy; and, without further ado, let's talk about this sensation that has captured the attention of so many others.

Don't Stop Now began off the EP, coming in with a low and slow synth line as layers of electronics come over it to a sudden stop. That fades out to a small electronic line, and soon enough we're in the midst of Chalsey Noelle's voice; though she may be considered as the backup vox, she could sure as hell slam out a song with her own powerful chords. The guitars running in with a powerful drum comes off nicely, and sure as hell when Weiss comes in singing along, the song becomes that much better.

Bound To Get Worse followed a pretty decent pattern as the last song, though I'd say there was less emphasis on electronic lines in comparison to the rock aspect. Take It All Away began off nice and slow, and catered to my tastes; I'm a fan of piano mixed with electronics, and the slow tune managed to suck me right in. The majority of the first half focused on material without guitar, while the second half brought in some more of a nice feel to it, still concerting itself in the gradual pace that cemented the track in the first place.

Patience was a bit of an interlude on the EP, serving through two minutes of electronic atmospheres; a bit of an ambient, space ring to it all. The epic sci-fi, action tone really grounded itself with the smooth guitar work that came later on in the song.

I think Nothing Is Painless was the first track that I felt as if the music was a bit overpowering in comparison to the voices that came out of it. Nonetheless, it was well done. The title track of the EP, Problems, had some wonderful and emotional acoustic set pieces within it, and was perhaps the most unique of the tracks presented, I'd say only second to Patience.

And, coming from this album, it's easy as pie to see why these guys have come off as an addiction to so many others. I did see a few flaws, such as the rock aspect in the first, second, and third songs to kind of overlap and take too many queues from one another, but those are minor complaints and nothing too rough to scratch the surface of the EP. This was a solid release, and my first go at listening to these guys. Nothing too shabby to be found here, I walk away from this release with a smile and a good heart, wishing them well on what's to come next. Sep 19 2014

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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