The Kiss That Took a Trip - Punk Cathedral
Post Punk, Experimental M.D. Trello, the producer behind The Kiss That Took A Trip (“The Kiss”), seems to think that his fifth album since the project began in 2006 has less “consistency and self-awareness” than previous ventures. If by inconsistent and unaware he means covering a number of different styles and not picking a central theme, then Trello may be right about Punk Cathedral, but that’s partially what makes the album so interesting.

Trello started The Kiss as an ambient and experimental project after years of making but never releasing the classically composed music that he’s know come to be known for. He seemingly has never looked back since his first release in 2006, even producing a 10-year anniversary compilation last year. The Kiss is now lauded as one of the most thoughtful and thought-provoking projects in its class, but with Punk Cathedral there is a marked shift which, self-aware or not, Trello most likely embarked upon intentionally.

The first few tracks on Punk Cathedral, “Ambient Punk”, “Kill the Pole Dancer” and “Stabbing Porcelain”, are still quite recognizably ambient, experimental and characteristically The Kiss. They’re classically composed and melodic but without vocals and still quite esoteric. When “Dry Swallowed Pill” enters the equation, however, the tone and style of the record goes decidedly post punk. Listeners are introduced to Trello’s soft, Thurston Moore-like vocals as feedback-laced yet melodic guitars swirl around a digital beat on this track, and the whole effect could also be classed as shoegaze. Quite an interesting shift, indeed.





Directly after “Dry Swallowed Pill”, “Crapola” strips down the rock style even more, as this track is devoid of almost anything digital. Trello’s vocals and a sole electric guitar are the main features here, and the effect is once again quite post punk. That said, Trello can’t leave the The Kiss experience entirely behind, as in and around the main vox and guitar is a gallery of accompanying instruments, which are clearly classically arranged. You can take The Kiss out of classical, but you can’t take classical out of The Kiss, it seems.

From “Crapola”, the album sort of runs the gamut of styles, but all of them are unmistakably The Kiss. Trello seems to shift back and forth between fully electronic, non-vocaled songs like “Love + Algebra” and “Yardmother” (these tracks still have Trellos ubiquitous and fabulous guitar work) and more indie or post punk submissions like “Guitar Pick Chew” and “Braggadocio”. It ends with a decidedly post punk and extremely well-composed track called “Queen of the Night Shift”, which is also probably the simplest track on the record. Full of junkyard country guitar tones and a woeful emotive quality, this stellar closing track may remind listeners of a cross between Tom Waits and Joy Division. For rock fans what better marriage is there, really?




If a listener is looking for continuity of genre on Punk Cathedral, he or she won’t find it here. That said, if one is familiar with The Kiss and Trello, it will be hard to mistake his classic and impeccable guitar style as well as his equally spot-on track composition. The addition of the more punk elements and Trello’s surprisingly beautiful vocals are at least a surprising bonus and at best a new direction for The Kiss which should be welcomed by fans and new listeners alike.

4
Brutal Resonance

The Kiss That Took a Trip - Punk Cathedral

8.0
"Great"
Released off label 2017
M.D. Trello, the producer behind The Kiss That Took A Trip (“The Kiss”), seems to think that his fifth album since the project began in 2006 has less “consistency and self-awareness” than previous ventures. If by inconsistent and unaware he means covering a number of different styles and not picking a central theme, then Trello may be right about Punk Cathedral, but that’s partially what makes the album so interesting.

Trello started The Kiss as an ambient and experimental project after years of making but never releasing the classically composed music that he’s know come to be known for. He seemingly has never looked back since his first release in 2006, even producing a 10-year anniversary compilation last year. The Kiss is now lauded as one of the most thoughtful and thought-provoking projects in its class, but with Punk Cathedral there is a marked shift which, self-aware or not, Trello most likely embarked upon intentionally.

The first few tracks on Punk Cathedral, “Ambient Punk”, “Kill the Pole Dancer” and “Stabbing Porcelain”, are still quite recognizably ambient, experimental and characteristically The Kiss. They’re classically composed and melodic but without vocals and still quite esoteric. When “Dry Swallowed Pill” enters the equation, however, the tone and style of the record goes decidedly post punk. Listeners are introduced to Trello’s soft, Thurston Moore-like vocals as feedback-laced yet melodic guitars swirl around a digital beat on this track, and the whole effect could also be classed as shoegaze. Quite an interesting shift, indeed.





Directly after “Dry Swallowed Pill”, “Crapola” strips down the rock style even more, as this track is devoid of almost anything digital. Trello’s vocals and a sole electric guitar are the main features here, and the effect is once again quite post punk. That said, Trello can’t leave the The Kiss experience entirely behind, as in and around the main vox and guitar is a gallery of accompanying instruments, which are clearly classically arranged. You can take The Kiss out of classical, but you can’t take classical out of The Kiss, it seems.

From “Crapola”, the album sort of runs the gamut of styles, but all of them are unmistakably The Kiss. Trello seems to shift back and forth between fully electronic, non-vocaled songs like “Love + Algebra” and “Yardmother” (these tracks still have Trellos ubiquitous and fabulous guitar work) and more indie or post punk submissions like “Guitar Pick Chew” and “Braggadocio”. It ends with a decidedly post punk and extremely well-composed track called “Queen of the Night Shift”, which is also probably the simplest track on the record. Full of junkyard country guitar tones and a woeful emotive quality, this stellar closing track may remind listeners of a cross between Tom Waits and Joy Division. For rock fans what better marriage is there, really?




If a listener is looking for continuity of genre on Punk Cathedral, he or she won’t find it here. That said, if one is familiar with The Kiss and Trello, it will be hard to mistake his classic and impeccable guitar style as well as his equally spot-on track composition. The addition of the more punk elements and Trello’s surprisingly beautiful vocals are at least a surprising bonus and at best a new direction for The Kiss which should be welcomed by fans and new listeners alike.

Jul 31 2017

Off label

Official relesae released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Layla Marino

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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