SOL - MINIVIEW: Where Suns Come To Die
Metal, Drone The most capturing moments of SOL's experimental metal/drone album "Where Suns Come To Die" would have to be their undeniable story telling traits that come from a matured, experienced voice. This man, whoever he may be, speaks of a desolate wasteland where all he once knew is now distraught and destroyed. It's a misanthropic, yet poetic speech about whatever world he may be living in (which might even be the present day), but is nonetheless alluring. It is just a shame that his voice only stars in 'This Bitter Earth' and then proceeds to dip down in appearance in the next coming songs.

What I did appreciate musically about this project is that they are able to take classic instrumentation and bend it to their whim with twisted, experimental sounds. Again, not to mention the song twice, but 'This Bitter Earth' perhaps did this the best, panning out a lovely eight minute song. Through broken, wind swept barrens to noisy and foul sludge pits, the song hits it all. What I don't like, however, is the same-y sounding drone work that appears on the three other songs. Aside from including some guitar work, the drones are exactly what you'd expect and there's nothing new to be found. 

SOL did great in finding their niche genre, but now they need to trudge away from already walked paths, utilize that amazing lead voice some more, and then they'll be both great at exposition and execution. 
3
Brutal Resonance

SOL - MINIVIEW: Where Suns Come To Die

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2015 by Cold Spring
The most capturing moments of SOL's experimental metal/drone album "Where Suns Come To Die" would have to be their undeniable story telling traits that come from a matured, experienced voice. This man, whoever he may be, speaks of a desolate wasteland where all he once knew is now distraught and destroyed. It's a misanthropic, yet poetic speech about whatever world he may be living in (which might even be the present day), but is nonetheless alluring. It is just a shame that his voice only stars in 'This Bitter Earth' and then proceeds to dip down in appearance in the next coming songs.

What I did appreciate musically about this project is that they are able to take classic instrumentation and bend it to their whim with twisted, experimental sounds. Again, not to mention the song twice, but 'This Bitter Earth' perhaps did this the best, panning out a lovely eight minute song. Through broken, wind swept barrens to noisy and foul sludge pits, the song hits it all. What I don't like, however, is the same-y sounding drone work that appears on the three other songs. Aside from including some guitar work, the drones are exactly what you'd expect and there's nothing new to be found. 

SOL did great in finding their niche genre, but now they need to trudge away from already walked paths, utilize that amazing lead voice some more, and then they'll be both great at exposition and execution. 
Sep 09 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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