SHIV-R - Requiem for the Hyperreal
Dark Electro Though SHIV-R's latest and greatest album Requiem for the Hyperreal has been out for a little over three weeks now, my busy schedule has prevented me from sitting down and really listening to it. However, I have finally found the allotted time and pressed the play button earlier this morning on the album. My ears thanked me for the engaging electronic wake up songs as I fluttered from one to the other on this fifty minute ballad. While Wax Wings Will Burn began a rebirth for the project that coincided with better production and a newfound vocal set that set itself to the music more than before in the past, Requiem for the Hyperreal is a better understanding of every mature aspect SHIV-R has shaped and carved since their debut in 2008. 

The clean cut electronics approach with minimalism once 'Halo' kicks in. Thumps of hard bass and underlying notes hover below Crane's voice. The press release sent out to the masses stated that these lyrics would not sound out of place if sung by Marilyn Manson, but I heavily disagree with that - I don't think there is anyone that could sing to these sungs aside from Crane himself. Along with the other half of SHIV-R, Ben Bulig, this dynamic duo has shaped SHIV-R to their own liking and not a single soul on this planet could replace what they're doing by a long shot. 

'Malediction' hits in next with a fun and stompy electro rhythm that has probably - and if not, should - infect the dancefloors of your local goth club. 'Cheshire Grin', the lead single off the album that released prior to it with attached remixes to boot, came in next. This song keeps the dark electro bliss going with an added layer of melodic synths. Percussion and glitchy effects take over 'Here in the Dark' while 'Disconnect' once again proves SHIV-R are kings when it comes to creating rhythmic hits. 

'Escape Velocity' bumped up the BPM and gave nods to techno; there is no shame in that considering industrial and techno can practically go hand in hand. Nonetheless, it was a fun song and one that I'm putting on my workout playlist immediately. Another differing song from the standard thus far, 'Entropy' provided big bass and swooping electronics. 'Something to Say' and 'Panacea' are two of the more aggressive songs on the album, clashing lightly crunchy electronics with SHIV-R's vibes. 

SHIV-R made love with techno once again with the song 'The Moth Collector', which arguably has one of the best intros on the album. The song evolves as it goes along, continually blasting in other waves of powerful booms, but it comes full circle towards the end. SHIV-R then made a u-turn with the album as 'Apples', the second to last song on the album, provided a slow moving melody that was contradictory to the rest of the album. But there's always room for different structures on an album, and when it sounds this good I will not argue. The final song on the album slowly broke in like a dying robot; all the circuits and gears are moving, but it is slow, emotional, and the final shut down of it all is a sight to behold. 

I always find it difficult to send out a fantastic album like this with final words. I already feel like I have spent enough time talking about the album and how good it is, so I see no reason as to why I should continue further nor as to why you're not getting this one as of just yet. Requiem for the Hyperreal is simply a fantastic album from two guys who know what they're doing. GET IT. 


5
Brutal Resonance

SHIV-R - Requiem for the Hyperreal

9.0
"Amazing"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2017 by Blind Mice Productions
Though SHIV-R's latest and greatest album Requiem for the Hyperreal has been out for a little over three weeks now, my busy schedule has prevented me from sitting down and really listening to it. However, I have finally found the allotted time and pressed the play button earlier this morning on the album. My ears thanked me for the engaging electronic wake up songs as I fluttered from one to the other on this fifty minute ballad. While Wax Wings Will Burn began a rebirth for the project that coincided with better production and a newfound vocal set that set itself to the music more than before in the past, Requiem for the Hyperreal is a better understanding of every mature aspect SHIV-R has shaped and carved since their debut in 2008. 

The clean cut electronics approach with minimalism once 'Halo' kicks in. Thumps of hard bass and underlying notes hover below Crane's voice. The press release sent out to the masses stated that these lyrics would not sound out of place if sung by Marilyn Manson, but I heavily disagree with that - I don't think there is anyone that could sing to these sungs aside from Crane himself. Along with the other half of SHIV-R, Ben Bulig, this dynamic duo has shaped SHIV-R to their own liking and not a single soul on this planet could replace what they're doing by a long shot. 

'Malediction' hits in next with a fun and stompy electro rhythm that has probably - and if not, should - infect the dancefloors of your local goth club. 'Cheshire Grin', the lead single off the album that released prior to it with attached remixes to boot, came in next. This song keeps the dark electro bliss going with an added layer of melodic synths. Percussion and glitchy effects take over 'Here in the Dark' while 'Disconnect' once again proves SHIV-R are kings when it comes to creating rhythmic hits. 

'Escape Velocity' bumped up the BPM and gave nods to techno; there is no shame in that considering industrial and techno can practically go hand in hand. Nonetheless, it was a fun song and one that I'm putting on my workout playlist immediately. Another differing song from the standard thus far, 'Entropy' provided big bass and swooping electronics. 'Something to Say' and 'Panacea' are two of the more aggressive songs on the album, clashing lightly crunchy electronics with SHIV-R's vibes. 

SHIV-R made love with techno once again with the song 'The Moth Collector', which arguably has one of the best intros on the album. The song evolves as it goes along, continually blasting in other waves of powerful booms, but it comes full circle towards the end. SHIV-R then made a u-turn with the album as 'Apples', the second to last song on the album, provided a slow moving melody that was contradictory to the rest of the album. But there's always room for different structures on an album, and when it sounds this good I will not argue. The final song on the album slowly broke in like a dying robot; all the circuits and gears are moving, but it is slow, emotional, and the final shut down of it all is a sight to behold. 

I always find it difficult to send out a fantastic album like this with final words. I already feel like I have spent enough time talking about the album and how good it is, so I see no reason as to why I should continue further nor as to why you're not getting this one as of just yet. Requiem for the Hyperreal is simply a fantastic album from two guys who know what they're doing. GET IT. 


Oct 17 2017

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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