Sabled Sun - Signals I
Drone, Dark Ambient Alright, so, I do not wish to dwell upon an intro for too long, as you can easily dig up information on other articles relating to this project in other reviews (most notable within the Signals II review). Now, for a brief introduction to the artist, the man behind the project's name is Simon Heath, and he absolutely adores drone and dark ambient music. However, as much as he adores this form of music, it does not play all too well in his favor in this track.

Yes, it is a single, and, yes, it is boring. Why, may you ask? I feel as though I can compare this to an hour long TV show. Within a TV show, you want the action to be moving, to keep your attention and your eyes glued to the screen. If not every five minutes something changes, something happens, than we are stuck with a boring episode of a series where we are staring at the same character's face for one too many long minutes. And then we simply walk away from the TV and decide that it isn't worth watching if all you're going to be is bored. And Signals I has that same effect.

Within drone music, as limited as the sounds are within the music, it needs to be changing every five minutes, it needs to be dynamic in its simplistic form. Every change, every slight note that's input, every wave of sound that decides to pulsate in my ears needs to refresh the song for me. Otherwise, I am stuck with complete boredom, as if I'm just listening to background noise. And, that's where the problems in this album begins. The changes are there, but they are so little that I can simply walk away from it without a pin drop of guilt.

I mean, I listened through the whole song twice, and right now I am on my third shot with it, and there isn't anything that I can point out about it besides saying, "Yup. That's drone. Not much else to it." Do I like it? Sure. It's not the worst thing that I've heard in my life, but it certainly is not in the best. When I'm listening to this, I feel as though it's a track I could listen to when I'm just sitting around and doing nothing. Because the track does nothing for me. It would go hand in hand in that sense.

And this really is disappointing. For there is a lot of talent within the mind of Simon Heath. And it's almost annoying to see the man pump out track after track after track of music while they aren't all too great. If there was more thought, more time given into this project for it to mature and get more edge, maybe then it would become a great piece of music and something that could really space me out from my everyday life, but that has not happened, and nor will it with this long and dull track.
3
Brutal Resonance

Sabled Sun - Signals I

5.0
"Mediocre"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2013 by Cryo Chamber
Alright, so, I do not wish to dwell upon an intro for too long, as you can easily dig up information on other articles relating to this project in other reviews (most notable within the Signals II review). Now, for a brief introduction to the artist, the man behind the project's name is Simon Heath, and he absolutely adores drone and dark ambient music. However, as much as he adores this form of music, it does not play all too well in his favor in this track.

Yes, it is a single, and, yes, it is boring. Why, may you ask? I feel as though I can compare this to an hour long TV show. Within a TV show, you want the action to be moving, to keep your attention and your eyes glued to the screen. If not every five minutes something changes, something happens, than we are stuck with a boring episode of a series where we are staring at the same character's face for one too many long minutes. And then we simply walk away from the TV and decide that it isn't worth watching if all you're going to be is bored. And Signals I has that same effect.

Within drone music, as limited as the sounds are within the music, it needs to be changing every five minutes, it needs to be dynamic in its simplistic form. Every change, every slight note that's input, every wave of sound that decides to pulsate in my ears needs to refresh the song for me. Otherwise, I am stuck with complete boredom, as if I'm just listening to background noise. And, that's where the problems in this album begins. The changes are there, but they are so little that I can simply walk away from it without a pin drop of guilt.

I mean, I listened through the whole song twice, and right now I am on my third shot with it, and there isn't anything that I can point out about it besides saying, "Yup. That's drone. Not much else to it." Do I like it? Sure. It's not the worst thing that I've heard in my life, but it certainly is not in the best. When I'm listening to this, I feel as though it's a track I could listen to when I'm just sitting around and doing nothing. Because the track does nothing for me. It would go hand in hand in that sense.

And this really is disappointing. For there is a lot of talent within the mind of Simon Heath. And it's almost annoying to see the man pump out track after track after track of music while they aren't all too great. If there was more thought, more time given into this project for it to mature and get more edge, maybe then it would become a great piece of music and something that could really space me out from my everyday life, but that has not happened, and nor will it with this long and dull track. Oct 15 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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