Red Mecca - I See Darkness In You
Darkwave, Dark Electro Red Mecca has been stealing my heart ever since I heard their album "Covered With Rain" back in 2014. Both Jan Strandqvist's master in synthesizer rhythms and Frida Madeleine's hypnotizing chords crafted an album that I thought was nearly perfect. I almost thought they took my near perfect rating as competition when they released their follow-up album "Electricity" in 2016. I was completely blown away by their impossibly refined techniques and electronic delivery that resulted in them receiving a perfect and legendary score. 

2017 saw the release of the two-sided single "Set In Motion" that teased their upcoming album. That and the previous two albums led me to anticipate Red Mecca's forthcoming album with utter eagerness. Thus I was led into the present day with Red Mecca's most recent album "I See Darkness In You". Listening to the album has been both an absolute pleasure to get through but also a heartbreaking experience with the knowledge that Madeleine will be leaving Red Mecca after this album. This does mark the end of an era for the project, but I am still wishing her all the best and hope she will come back with her own epic project. But now that that's out of the way, let's get on with the album. 

"I See Darkness In You" starts off with a solo effort from Strandqvist himself as he showcases his synth perfection. The instrumental song trickles in electronic blips until it falls into a dreamy darkwave song. The next two songs 'Core of the Earth' and 'I See Darkness In You' I had mixed feelings with. Both Strandqvist's electronic perfection and Madeleine's vocals are on full display in both songs, but I also felt as if the mixing was a bit off. Whereas the duo always makes sure both the music and vocals are well balanced in classic Red Mecca style, I felt as if the vocals were overpowering the beat. This was not a huge issue and despite my minor complaint I still found myself enjoying the songs - just as not as much as the other songs from both this and past efforts. 

However, the album took an upward turn when the previously mentioned single 'Set In Motion' hit. And rather than repeat myself from my previous review, I'm going to do a little copy and paste effort here: 'Set In Motion' is another darkwave chant from the Swedish duo that calls upon remnants of dreams and the very essence of life itself. Frida's vocals are still distinct but the usual and heavy dragging, echo effect on her vocals is gone in place for cleaner and playful chords. Strandqvist's layered electronic pulses bring the song to life even more. The backing synth and electro rhythm brings out sleepy fantasies and paints landscapes that could only be provided through sheer imagination. 

'Communities' came on next and continued to display Red Mecca's more emotional side. The synthetic sweeps combined with Madeleine's vocals was brilliantly pulled off. 'Alcohol' was another single that was released prior to this album, and it's quite different from what one would normally hear from the band. A quicker paced, funky album with blasting synths around the chorus, 'Alcohol' brings into perspective the nastier side of over consumption. 

'Mirror' gets a little synthpop oriented with catchy hooks but always with a darker, more sinister undertone. 'What is Coming' quiets things down after 'Mirror', using a bit of ambiance in the background to craft a lethal environment. 'State of Grace' brings in some post-punk efforts as soft synth walls helped fill out the structure of the song as the rest of the elements worked their magic. The final song on the album actually had a bit of a cyberpunk vibe to it. Sounding like the ending credits song to a science-fiction movie, the beats are odd and robotic vocals overtake the track. And thus "I See Darkness In You" ends. 

While there is a little to complain about here and there in the album that mainly comes from the second and third track, "I See Darkness In You" is as complete an album from Red Mecca as you'll ever get. The production is crisp and clear and follows previous examples set by Red Mecca. This album continues to show why they have such a dedicated fanbase and continue to evolve. With the departure of Madeleine I can only hope Red Mecca finds a vocalist that can equal her, but that's a waiting game that will have to be played out. 


4
Brutal Resonance

Red Mecca - I See Darkness In You

8.5
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2018 by Massproduktion
Red Mecca has been stealing my heart ever since I heard their album "Covered With Rain" back in 2014. Both Jan Strandqvist's master in synthesizer rhythms and Frida Madeleine's hypnotizing chords crafted an album that I thought was nearly perfect. I almost thought they took my near perfect rating as competition when they released their follow-up album "Electricity" in 2016. I was completely blown away by their impossibly refined techniques and electronic delivery that resulted in them receiving a perfect and legendary score. 

2017 saw the release of the two-sided single "Set In Motion" that teased their upcoming album. That and the previous two albums led me to anticipate Red Mecca's forthcoming album with utter eagerness. Thus I was led into the present day with Red Mecca's most recent album "I See Darkness In You". Listening to the album has been both an absolute pleasure to get through but also a heartbreaking experience with the knowledge that Madeleine will be leaving Red Mecca after this album. This does mark the end of an era for the project, but I am still wishing her all the best and hope she will come back with her own epic project. But now that that's out of the way, let's get on with the album. 

"I See Darkness In You" starts off with a solo effort from Strandqvist himself as he showcases his synth perfection. The instrumental song trickles in electronic blips until it falls into a dreamy darkwave song. The next two songs 'Core of the Earth' and 'I See Darkness In You' I had mixed feelings with. Both Strandqvist's electronic perfection and Madeleine's vocals are on full display in both songs, but I also felt as if the mixing was a bit off. Whereas the duo always makes sure both the music and vocals are well balanced in classic Red Mecca style, I felt as if the vocals were overpowering the beat. This was not a huge issue and despite my minor complaint I still found myself enjoying the songs - just as not as much as the other songs from both this and past efforts. 

However, the album took an upward turn when the previously mentioned single 'Set In Motion' hit. And rather than repeat myself from my previous review, I'm going to do a little copy and paste effort here: 'Set In Motion' is another darkwave chant from the Swedish duo that calls upon remnants of dreams and the very essence of life itself. Frida's vocals are still distinct but the usual and heavy dragging, echo effect on her vocals is gone in place for cleaner and playful chords. Strandqvist's layered electronic pulses bring the song to life even more. The backing synth and electro rhythm brings out sleepy fantasies and paints landscapes that could only be provided through sheer imagination. 

'Communities' came on next and continued to display Red Mecca's more emotional side. The synthetic sweeps combined with Madeleine's vocals was brilliantly pulled off. 'Alcohol' was another single that was released prior to this album, and it's quite different from what one would normally hear from the band. A quicker paced, funky album with blasting synths around the chorus, 'Alcohol' brings into perspective the nastier side of over consumption. 

'Mirror' gets a little synthpop oriented with catchy hooks but always with a darker, more sinister undertone. 'What is Coming' quiets things down after 'Mirror', using a bit of ambiance in the background to craft a lethal environment. 'State of Grace' brings in some post-punk efforts as soft synth walls helped fill out the structure of the song as the rest of the elements worked their magic. The final song on the album actually had a bit of a cyberpunk vibe to it. Sounding like the ending credits song to a science-fiction movie, the beats are odd and robotic vocals overtake the track. And thus "I See Darkness In You" ends. 

While there is a little to complain about here and there in the album that mainly comes from the second and third track, "I See Darkness In You" is as complete an album from Red Mecca as you'll ever get. The production is crisp and clear and follows previous examples set by Red Mecca. This album continues to show why they have such a dedicated fanbase and continue to evolve. With the departure of Madeleine I can only hope Red Mecca finds a vocalist that can equal her, but that's a waiting game that will have to be played out. 


May 31 2018

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Red Mecca - 'Electricity'

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Red Mecca - 'Set in Motion'

Review, Jan 28 2017

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