Red Mecca - Electricity
Darkwave, Dark Electro
There was hardly a scratch much less a hair on Red Mecca's previously release Covered With Rain as I gave the fantastic album a 9.5 out of 10. So, I honestly find myself asking myself as I listen to their new album, "How do I score an album that beats it's predecessor ten times over?" The number in the corner rates this album a 10 out of 10, but I do not believe that any score will be illustrious enough to highlight the grandeur of this album - and I doubt my words will be able to commit to that same achievement. But, I will do my very best to write a script out for this album in order for you to understand the beauty that is Electricity

Electricity released just a couple of days ago, though it was supposed to be released earlier than that. However, in an interview with A Tune For You, Jan Strandqvist stated that he and Frida Madeleine decided to postpone the album for quality's sake; both of them wanted to create the best record they possibly could. However, I am not sure either of these talented musicians realize just how good of an album they have made. It is only February but I am certain that when the time comes for me to state which album claims the number one spot on on my Album of the Year list, Electricity will be chosen. 

Red Mecca forms their music from events of life, not just for the sake of making music. So when the introductory track is titled 'Blood on the Streets', you have got to realize you are entering an album that is much more than you have ever expected. While the song can reflect upon anything – from the political European turmoil to a personal dance with the Devil – I believe it is also Red Mecca's intention for their audience to take these songs and apply it where necessary in their own lives. How someone could not get lost in the witchy yet sublime beats that spread over my body is unknown to me; all I do know is that from the start of the album I was sucked in. I knew I would not be leaving this delicate and emotional ballad until the very end. 

'Animal' placates the body and soul with more sweeping spiritual electronics and hypnotizing bits of strung out guitar work.  Medeleine's gorgeous vocals fly along these healing beats like a peaceful ghost grazing the house they once lived in; if anything, her voice has matured and become more solid. 'Control' reels in a more pop sound with lighter intentions; this is a feel good song, but it does not fail to enrapture anyone that comes across its Siren-like breath. 

'Ritual' sounds exactly like one in an electronic way; it is riveting, peaceful, and all but bears positive vibes. It serves as a short, intermission track as it only lasts one minute and eighteen seconds, but that does not stop it from being a pleasure. 'Always There' comes straight after, and most of the witchy essence present in previous tracks completely dissolves. Instead, we are dealt a delightful blend of 80s pop sounds mixed with Strandqvist's excellent productions skills. This song also shows off that Madeleine can pull off more than one set of chords; she can shift between eloquent bursts of lyrics and evocative, drawn out chords like nothing. 

 I feel as if 'Ambition' will appear to industrial fans more than anyone else. This experimental play of sounds switches between a tad bit of EBM during verse, but switches to dreamy deliveries during the chorus. However, 'Skin' brings us back into the world of Red Mecca with more dreampop and the song is just brilliant; a catchy beat and Madeleine's once more beautiful voice guides us through troubled times. 

Slowing down the pace and giving a clearer lyrical delivery, 'The World Through Borrowed Eyes' is stunning. 'Hole In The Ground' has some impressive electronic lines running through it; all the little bits and bobs of the song solidly sealed it together. 'Hearts' ends the album as the final track, and leaves off with a bright and sunny day; there may be some things on the Earth that may bring us down, but tomorrow is always another day to make life better. I feel as if 'Hearts' gives off this message, and it is poetic. 

From mixing to mastering, electronic rhythms to a beautiful voice, Red Mecca has pulled off something that is quite near impossible. Jan Strandqvist and Frida Madelein are a powerhouse to be reckoned with. They are able to work with one another like two people who have known each other for three lifetimes. The understanding they have for each others' talents is shocking and awe-inspiring and it all shows on Electricity. Whether you're looking for music to heal yourself, or for emotional music to cry to like leaning on the shoulder of a close friend, Red Mecca's Electricity has it all. You are only stopping yourself from experiencing perfection. 
5
Brutal Resonance

Red Mecca - Electricity

There was hardly a scratch much less a hair on Red Mecca's previously release Covered With Rain as I gave the fantastic album a 9.5 out of 10. So, I honestly find myself asking myself as I listen to their new album, "How do I score an album that beats it's predecessor ten times over?" The number in the corner rates this album a 10 out of 10, but I do not believe that any score will be illustrious enough to highlight the grandeur of this album - and I doubt my words will be able to commit to that same achievement. But, I will do my very best to write a script out for this album in order for you to understand the beauty that is Electricity

Electricity released just a couple of days ago, though it was supposed to be released earlier than that. However, in an interview with A Tune For You, Jan Strandqvist stated that he and Frida Madeleine decided to postpone the album for quality's sake; both of them wanted to create the best record they possibly could. However, I am not sure either of these talented musicians realize just how good of an album they have made. It is only February but I am certain that when the time comes for me to state which album claims the number one spot on on my Album of the Year list, Electricity will be chosen. 

Red Mecca forms their music from events of life, not just for the sake of making music. So when the introductory track is titled 'Blood on the Streets', you have got to realize you are entering an album that is much more than you have ever expected. While the song can reflect upon anything – from the political European turmoil to a personal dance with the Devil – I believe it is also Red Mecca's intention for their audience to take these songs and apply it where necessary in their own lives. How someone could not get lost in the witchy yet sublime beats that spread over my body is unknown to me; all I do know is that from the start of the album I was sucked in. I knew I would not be leaving this delicate and emotional ballad until the very end. 

'Animal' placates the body and soul with more sweeping spiritual electronics and hypnotizing bits of strung out guitar work.  Medeleine's gorgeous vocals fly along these healing beats like a peaceful ghost grazing the house they once lived in; if anything, her voice has matured and become more solid. 'Control' reels in a more pop sound with lighter intentions; this is a feel good song, but it does not fail to enrapture anyone that comes across its Siren-like breath. 

'Ritual' sounds exactly like one in an electronic way; it is riveting, peaceful, and all but bears positive vibes. It serves as a short, intermission track as it only lasts one minute and eighteen seconds, but that does not stop it from being a pleasure. 'Always There' comes straight after, and most of the witchy essence present in previous tracks completely dissolves. Instead, we are dealt a delightful blend of 80s pop sounds mixed with Strandqvist's excellent productions skills. This song also shows off that Madeleine can pull off more than one set of chords; she can shift between eloquent bursts of lyrics and evocative, drawn out chords like nothing. 

 I feel as if 'Ambition' will appear to industrial fans more than anyone else. This experimental play of sounds switches between a tad bit of EBM during verse, but switches to dreamy deliveries during the chorus. However, 'Skin' brings us back into the world of Red Mecca with more dreampop and the song is just brilliant; a catchy beat and Madeleine's once more beautiful voice guides us through troubled times. 

Slowing down the pace and giving a clearer lyrical delivery, 'The World Through Borrowed Eyes' is stunning. 'Hole In The Ground' has some impressive electronic lines running through it; all the little bits and bobs of the song solidly sealed it together. 'Hearts' ends the album as the final track, and leaves off with a bright and sunny day; there may be some things on the Earth that may bring us down, but tomorrow is always another day to make life better. I feel as if 'Hearts' gives off this message, and it is poetic. 

From mixing to mastering, electronic rhythms to a beautiful voice, Red Mecca has pulled off something that is quite near impossible. Jan Strandqvist and Frida Madelein are a powerhouse to be reckoned with. They are able to work with one another like two people who have known each other for three lifetimes. The understanding they have for each others' talents is shocking and awe-inspiring and it all shows on Electricity. Whether you're looking for music to heal yourself, or for emotional music to cry to like leaning on the shoulder of a close friend, Red Mecca's Electricity has it all. You are only stopping yourself from experiencing perfection. 
Feb 22 2016

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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