PIG vs. M.C. Lord of the Flies - Compound Eye
Industrial Rock Alright. There are a couple of big names involved in this release and it's so easy to find out all about them via Google, so I won't really be explaining who these gentlemen are aside from simple shit. And that simple shit is as follows: Marc Heal (Cubanate, C-Tec, Ashtrayhead) is performing under the moniker of MC Lord of The Flies and Raymond Watts (KMFDM, Schaft, Primitive Race) is under his PIG alter-ego.

Anyway, what we have here is two new tracks from each artist. Let's start off with MC Lord of The Flies. He takes over the title track, which is perhaps exactly what you'd expect from this artist. Some industrial rock featuring some solid sounds and a pretty good rhythm. It's not bad at all. The Doll is his second song, and the drum work is a little better in this one. Also, the vocal work in both songs was a little distorted but tasty.

Rhys Fulber remixed the title track (called the Fulbertron Mix), and takes out all remnants of guitar work, and replaces it with a funky techno beat to help all ravers do what they're best at. Which is...Well...Rave. I suppose that Heal's original mix just wasn't good enough, because he came back and mixed the title track as well. More electronics flirt with the song than anything, but the sound is a little jagged and doesn't sound like it was put together as best as it could be.

PIG's Drugzilla was the standout song on the album, being fairly smooth and sounding as if it were the best produced. Also, the fluctuating vocals from sort of whining to growling was superb. His other contribution, Shake, I just could not really get into. The song just felt like it was missing something; whether that be more of an underlying rhythm or what not, it just didn't do much for me.

The Pork Talk mix done by Ray Watts (I suppose he wasn't just satisfied with giving out one version of his song, either) adds in gritty guitar work and some glitchy effects to the song. I still prefer the original mix over this one, but still, this version wasn't bad, either. Lastly, Heal strips down Shake in his Snakehandler Mix, getting rid of the guitar work, but adding in more flair with other effects that transformed the track into something lovely.

And, if you couldn't guess, I'm kind of having mixed feelings about this release. There were moments where I completely dug straight into it and ate every ounce of genius that came to me, but then I would be taken right out of my trance as soon as the next song hit. It's a sort of hit and miss effect that this album had. However, there wasn't a single song that I completely detested, and I was able to get through it without wanting to walk away, so that's always a plus. Nonetheless, check it out for yourself; fans of either of these men or any of the projects they've been involved with will not be disappointed.
3
Brutal Resonance

PIG vs. M.C. Lord of the Flies - Compound Eye

6.0
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2015 by Armalyte Industries
Alright. There are a couple of big names involved in this release and it's so easy to find out all about them via Google, so I won't really be explaining who these gentlemen are aside from simple shit. And that simple shit is as follows: Marc Heal (Cubanate, C-Tec, Ashtrayhead) is performing under the moniker of MC Lord of The Flies and Raymond Watts (KMFDM, Schaft, Primitive Race) is under his PIG alter-ego.

Anyway, what we have here is two new tracks from each artist. Let's start off with MC Lord of The Flies. He takes over the title track, which is perhaps exactly what you'd expect from this artist. Some industrial rock featuring some solid sounds and a pretty good rhythm. It's not bad at all. The Doll is his second song, and the drum work is a little better in this one. Also, the vocal work in both songs was a little distorted but tasty.

Rhys Fulber remixed the title track (called the Fulbertron Mix), and takes out all remnants of guitar work, and replaces it with a funky techno beat to help all ravers do what they're best at. Which is...Well...Rave. I suppose that Heal's original mix just wasn't good enough, because he came back and mixed the title track as well. More electronics flirt with the song than anything, but the sound is a little jagged and doesn't sound like it was put together as best as it could be.

PIG's Drugzilla was the standout song on the album, being fairly smooth and sounding as if it were the best produced. Also, the fluctuating vocals from sort of whining to growling was superb. His other contribution, Shake, I just could not really get into. The song just felt like it was missing something; whether that be more of an underlying rhythm or what not, it just didn't do much for me.

The Pork Talk mix done by Ray Watts (I suppose he wasn't just satisfied with giving out one version of his song, either) adds in gritty guitar work and some glitchy effects to the song. I still prefer the original mix over this one, but still, this version wasn't bad, either. Lastly, Heal strips down Shake in his Snakehandler Mix, getting rid of the guitar work, but adding in more flair with other effects that transformed the track into something lovely.

And, if you couldn't guess, I'm kind of having mixed feelings about this release. There were moments where I completely dug straight into it and ate every ounce of genius that came to me, but then I would be taken right out of my trance as soon as the next song hit. It's a sort of hit and miss effect that this album had. However, there wasn't a single song that I completely detested, and I was able to get through it without wanting to walk away, so that's always a plus. Nonetheless, check it out for yourself; fans of either of these men or any of the projects they've been involved with will not be disappointed. Mar 25 2015

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

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