Nitro/Noise - No Cure For Apocalypse
TBM, Dark Electro Realizing the potential they had, Nitro/Noise was quickly swept up by by the ever-on-the-lookout label DWA. Knowing what sells, knowing who's going to go further in their career, they made good on picking up this act. And, 2012 was testimony to that; with their debut album Total Nihilism receiving praise from various outlets (ours included), it was no surprise that they would soon come to be a respected act.

And now in 2014, we're given another foray into the world of hard electronics, pounding bass, and growling vocals. No Cure For Apocalypse is an album that can cause hearts to jump, yet be severely touching when the synths play perfectly well alongside the harder tones. You can take a look at Want Some near the two and a half minute mark to fully appreciate what I'm saying.

This album does follow up on much of the sounds that were present in the previous album; completely destructive dance tunes that you can immediately get stomping to. Not completely fresh or unique or original, but they've built upon their previous formula to crack out another album that's both alluring and exciting. Not only that, but they also come along with a cleaner sound, making it all sound more refined. In terms of quality, the band went up a notch.

For those longing for a harder punch in their song, even mixed with some metal influences, go for Censorsh!t. Sure, it may tackle some themes that have been touched upon by a lot of other bands with an attitude, but the beat slams right home. And, for tracks unmentioned so far, all the songs from one to nine will be well appreciated on the dance floor. That's if this album gets the time in the light it deserves.

A little special surprise awaits in the final two tracks, though. Nachtmahr joins in on We Demand Better, which is meant to be a somewhat funny track with starkly probing lyrics at all of Thomas Rainer's critics. Funny, ballsy, I liked it.

And, at the end, we're given a slow ride out of the album with a piano rework of Don't Be Afraid. Enhanced vocals, key strikes meant to evoke emotion, with a few other chimes and a bit of ambiance, it served well. It didn't completely blow me away, and I am a sucker for piano music, but it was nice.

And, at the end of it all, I walk away from a very well done album that absolutely slams you from one end of an electronic realm to the next. Again, harsh beats and distorted, growling vocals keep hounding the listener from the very beginning, all the way up to the near end. Plus, Thomas Rainer popping his head into a song was pretty unexpected and funny at the same time, so that's a plus.

Where criticism comes in, I have little to offer. I can't say I was completely blown away by this album; it had brilliant moments where I found myself in bliss while listening to the music, but there was also a majority of the time where I could say, "Yea, this is good," but didn't think it was so addicting as to give it my full attention on my third and fourth pass through.

But, the crew behind this music is good, and they know what they're doing more than most. Wicked sounds come out of this album at points, and they deserve their spot on the DWA roster. Let's see what they can do next.
4
Brutal Resonance

Nitro/Noise - No Cure For Apocalypse

Realizing the potential they had, Nitro/Noise was quickly swept up by by the ever-on-the-lookout label DWA. Knowing what sells, knowing who's going to go further in their career, they made good on picking up this act. And, 2012 was testimony to that; with their debut album Total Nihilism receiving praise from various outlets (ours included), it was no surprise that they would soon come to be a respected act.

And now in 2014, we're given another foray into the world of hard electronics, pounding bass, and growling vocals. No Cure For Apocalypse is an album that can cause hearts to jump, yet be severely touching when the synths play perfectly well alongside the harder tones. You can take a look at Want Some near the two and a half minute mark to fully appreciate what I'm saying.

This album does follow up on much of the sounds that were present in the previous album; completely destructive dance tunes that you can immediately get stomping to. Not completely fresh or unique or original, but they've built upon their previous formula to crack out another album that's both alluring and exciting. Not only that, but they also come along with a cleaner sound, making it all sound more refined. In terms of quality, the band went up a notch.

For those longing for a harder punch in their song, even mixed with some metal influences, go for Censorsh!t. Sure, it may tackle some themes that have been touched upon by a lot of other bands with an attitude, but the beat slams right home. And, for tracks unmentioned so far, all the songs from one to nine will be well appreciated on the dance floor. That's if this album gets the time in the light it deserves.

A little special surprise awaits in the final two tracks, though. Nachtmahr joins in on We Demand Better, which is meant to be a somewhat funny track with starkly probing lyrics at all of Thomas Rainer's critics. Funny, ballsy, I liked it.

And, at the end, we're given a slow ride out of the album with a piano rework of Don't Be Afraid. Enhanced vocals, key strikes meant to evoke emotion, with a few other chimes and a bit of ambiance, it served well. It didn't completely blow me away, and I am a sucker for piano music, but it was nice.

And, at the end of it all, I walk away from a very well done album that absolutely slams you from one end of an electronic realm to the next. Again, harsh beats and distorted, growling vocals keep hounding the listener from the very beginning, all the way up to the near end. Plus, Thomas Rainer popping his head into a song was pretty unexpected and funny at the same time, so that's a plus.

Where criticism comes in, I have little to offer. I can't say I was completely blown away by this album; it had brilliant moments where I found myself in bliss while listening to the music, but there was also a majority of the time where I could say, "Yea, this is good," but didn't think it was so addicting as to give it my full attention on my third and fourth pass through.

But, the crew behind this music is good, and they know what they're doing more than most. Wicked sounds come out of this album at points, and they deserve their spot on the DWA roster. Let's see what they can do next. Dec 03 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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