Neoslave - Autoviolator
Synthwave Neoslave is back with another wave of synthetic goodies wrapped up in a neat little package called "Autoviolator". However, those who found Neoslave through his previous album "From Womb to Doom" will be a little shocked not to find the schlock riddled B-movie references of the previous album, but a dedicated work of an electronic madman. For better or for worse, this is Neoslave's new album and we can start to dive into it right away. 

'Future is Dead' kicks off the album with discombobulated sounds all about; a hard glitched out kick paces for most of the song while robotic chords and other odd notes hit here and there. I will admit, it was not my favorite Neoslave song of all time, but 'Brutal Moves' brought us back into the fray. Fast paced like the previous song but with less distractions and a solid beat, 'Brutal Moves' is a fantastic platform. 'Electric Death Machine' has a bit of a gothic vibe to it with vampiric sounds all about and phantasm-like chords entering the song's domain, haunting it for a few seconds only to disappear the next. 

'Greedy Little Eyes', one of the lead singles from the album that managed to secure a music video, is a straight and strict song made for the dancefloor. With plenty of beats, downtime, and epic moments that will make you get jumping, it's a good song. 'Cross of Fire' continues the dancey electronic trend while 'The New Slaves' brings in a sense of dread and panic. It's funny that I should describe these couple of songs as fast and dirty, as they are followed by 'Love Oscillator'. It's a slow, melancholic song that breaks up the constant need to bang your electronic heads. Nonetheless, it was a welcome break and was one of the finer songs on the album. 



'Demonize' definitely had a bit of a techno vibe about it; while not as monotonous as some techno beats, the slow and steady beat seemed to borrow elements from the underground sub-genre. Synths are plenty about nonetheless in the song. And then came 'BloodRave'. Despite the title of the song, it's a hodge podge of slower and faster movements of electronic wonder, not the all out electro-fest one would think it would be. In a good way, I was caught off guard by this one. The final two songs, 'Solace' and 'Take Back Control' were another fine showcasing of Neoslave's skills, though I failed to find them completely unique in their own right. 

Neoslave is a synth-genius that knows how to flex his muscles and "Autoviolator" shows that. I will admit that I did not find it as addicting as his previous album, but that does not mean this is not going to make it onto my personal playlist. The songs are catchy and dancey as Hell, though sometimes I did find it hard to differ one song from the next on the album. While some songs, such as 'Greedy Little Eyes' and 'Love Oscillator' completely took my attention, I found myself drifting from other songs such as 'Solace'. So, I take it for what it's worth - Neoslave has crafted some really good gems on this one, and others that are great in production value, but lacking in unique nature.
4
Brutal Resonance

Neoslave - Autoviolator

7.0
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2019 by Lazerdiscs Records
Neoslave is back with another wave of synthetic goodies wrapped up in a neat little package called "Autoviolator". However, those who found Neoslave through his previous album "From Womb to Doom" will be a little shocked not to find the schlock riddled B-movie references of the previous album, but a dedicated work of an electronic madman. For better or for worse, this is Neoslave's new album and we can start to dive into it right away. 

'Future is Dead' kicks off the album with discombobulated sounds all about; a hard glitched out kick paces for most of the song while robotic chords and other odd notes hit here and there. I will admit, it was not my favorite Neoslave song of all time, but 'Brutal Moves' brought us back into the fray. Fast paced like the previous song but with less distractions and a solid beat, 'Brutal Moves' is a fantastic platform. 'Electric Death Machine' has a bit of a gothic vibe to it with vampiric sounds all about and phantasm-like chords entering the song's domain, haunting it for a few seconds only to disappear the next. 

'Greedy Little Eyes', one of the lead singles from the album that managed to secure a music video, is a straight and strict song made for the dancefloor. With plenty of beats, downtime, and epic moments that will make you get jumping, it's a good song. 'Cross of Fire' continues the dancey electronic trend while 'The New Slaves' brings in a sense of dread and panic. It's funny that I should describe these couple of songs as fast and dirty, as they are followed by 'Love Oscillator'. It's a slow, melancholic song that breaks up the constant need to bang your electronic heads. Nonetheless, it was a welcome break and was one of the finer songs on the album. 



'Demonize' definitely had a bit of a techno vibe about it; while not as monotonous as some techno beats, the slow and steady beat seemed to borrow elements from the underground sub-genre. Synths are plenty about nonetheless in the song. And then came 'BloodRave'. Despite the title of the song, it's a hodge podge of slower and faster movements of electronic wonder, not the all out electro-fest one would think it would be. In a good way, I was caught off guard by this one. The final two songs, 'Solace' and 'Take Back Control' were another fine showcasing of Neoslave's skills, though I failed to find them completely unique in their own right. 

Neoslave is a synth-genius that knows how to flex his muscles and "Autoviolator" shows that. I will admit that I did not find it as addicting as his previous album, but that does not mean this is not going to make it onto my personal playlist. The songs are catchy and dancey as Hell, though sometimes I did find it hard to differ one song from the next on the album. While some songs, such as 'Greedy Little Eyes' and 'Love Oscillator' completely took my attention, I found myself drifting from other songs such as 'Solace'. So, I take it for what it's worth - Neoslave has crafted some really good gems on this one, and others that are great in production value, but lacking in unique nature.
Apr 19 2019

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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