Necropolis - Necrosphere
Dark Ambient, Death Industrial Originally released in 2003 on one of my favourite labels, (Russia's Zhelezobeton - famed for also releasing Vetrophonia, Grismannen, DN23rd and Cloning Experiment Failure) - "Necrosphere" was a fast success, being released to an ultra limited 85 copy collective audience. Cold Spring decided to re-release this lost gospel in 2006, complete with an additional track.

Cold Spring never do anything by halves and always aspire, so what makes Necropolis a project worth the time and energy to reanimate?

Firstly, the popular use of extreme surroundings and recordings. Field samples here were made in Taiga, and in and around disused Military missile shafts. Expect an immediate theme of Ruins, Debris, and general Obliteration.

Being just like one of hundreds of Russian Ambient and Industrial projects, Necropolis blends and weaves a clever mix of Dark Ambient with Death Industrial - a scene that could hold so, so many classic projects, if almost every release wasn't restricted to xx copies. Yao 91404 D and Six Dead Bulgars are victims of this - two fantastic projects that probably won't ever be heard by 99% of the collective minds enduring this review.

Anyway, the opener "Necrosphere" is just short of thirty minutes in length, and originally was the sole track on this album. It carries the ever-present theme of Abandonment and Quarantine. The abrupt and unwelcoming sounds from within the shaft are often interrupted by startlingly loud crashes and very morose, tragic electronic loops.

At times it reads like a fable : intermittent tales of destitution and ghostly voices play out the songs of yesteryear, before deeply ominous and tangible frequencies carry a tone of beauty and pyhrric closure to this reconstruction. I honestly have no idea what goes on in Russia, be it Politically or Ethically, but so many Russian projects can carry such concepts and themes to their music that just do not get heard in Western Shores often. Themes of Slavery, Desolation, Bleeding for the Motherland and Patriotism ooze from so many of these artists like open wounds. Necropolis immediately stand out as triumphant and essential instigators of a new era of Death Industrial.

The closing ten minutes on here are just intense - I defy anyone to hear these and walk away unphased and unchanged.

Not content with ending this album here, CSR issued the second track as a treat to all newcomers to the project."Morning Air"; with its ironic and beautiful title, is a fourteen minute afterthought, which has significantly more energy and life to it. I guess it plays on the theme of Restoration and Hope, as there is much more going on here. My immediate thought reminds me of activity and business.

The problem with this music is to the untrained ear, every artist sounds almost Identical. For those of you looking for an introduction to Dark Ambience, Imagery, Propaganda and Stereotypes, I can't think of many albums that are better to start with.

Necropolis said it better than I ever will in the booklet to this reissue.
"If Only we might fall, Like cherry blossom in the wind. So pure and radiant!"

I think they did just that. Profound, Deep, and Significant.
4
Brutal Resonance

Necropolis - Necrosphere

Originally released in 2003 on one of my favourite labels, (Russia's Zhelezobeton - famed for also releasing Vetrophonia, Grismannen, DN23rd and Cloning Experiment Failure) - "Necrosphere" was a fast success, being released to an ultra limited 85 copy collective audience. Cold Spring decided to re-release this lost gospel in 2006, complete with an additional track.

Cold Spring never do anything by halves and always aspire, so what makes Necropolis a project worth the time and energy to reanimate?

Firstly, the popular use of extreme surroundings and recordings. Field samples here were made in Taiga, and in and around disused Military missile shafts. Expect an immediate theme of Ruins, Debris, and general Obliteration.

Being just like one of hundreds of Russian Ambient and Industrial projects, Necropolis blends and weaves a clever mix of Dark Ambient with Death Industrial - a scene that could hold so, so many classic projects, if almost every release wasn't restricted to xx copies. Yao 91404 D and Six Dead Bulgars are victims of this - two fantastic projects that probably won't ever be heard by 99% of the collective minds enduring this review.

Anyway, the opener "Necrosphere" is just short of thirty minutes in length, and originally was the sole track on this album. It carries the ever-present theme of Abandonment and Quarantine. The abrupt and unwelcoming sounds from within the shaft are often interrupted by startlingly loud crashes and very morose, tragic electronic loops.

At times it reads like a fable : intermittent tales of destitution and ghostly voices play out the songs of yesteryear, before deeply ominous and tangible frequencies carry a tone of beauty and pyhrric closure to this reconstruction. I honestly have no idea what goes on in Russia, be it Politically or Ethically, but so many Russian projects can carry such concepts and themes to their music that just do not get heard in Western Shores often. Themes of Slavery, Desolation, Bleeding for the Motherland and Patriotism ooze from so many of these artists like open wounds. Necropolis immediately stand out as triumphant and essential instigators of a new era of Death Industrial.

The closing ten minutes on here are just intense - I defy anyone to hear these and walk away unphased and unchanged.

Not content with ending this album here, CSR issued the second track as a treat to all newcomers to the project."Morning Air"; with its ironic and beautiful title, is a fourteen minute afterthought, which has significantly more energy and life to it. I guess it plays on the theme of Restoration and Hope, as there is much more going on here. My immediate thought reminds me of activity and business.

The problem with this music is to the untrained ear, every artist sounds almost Identical. For those of you looking for an introduction to Dark Ambience, Imagery, Propaganda and Stereotypes, I can't think of many albums that are better to start with.

Necropolis said it better than I ever will in the booklet to this reissue.
"If Only we might fall, Like cherry blossom in the wind. So pure and radiant!"

I think they did just that. Profound, Deep, and Significant.
Nov 10 2006

Nick Quarm

info@brutalresonance.com
Writer and contributor on Brutal Resonance

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