Nachtmahr - Veni Vidi Vici
EBM, Industrial Now, before I begin this review, I'd like to start off with a preliminary statement considering that for one reason or the other, Nachtmahr is surrounded with controversies. I, for one, always go into a review with a neutral stance, even if I already know what the band usually brings to the table. The album I could be reviewing could be from my most favorite band, one that has proven time and time again that they are absolutely fantastic, but there is always that bias that may slip it's way through causing me to give the album a higher or lower score just dependent on their previous work. But, the new album brings forth something new, so, as stated before, I always start off with a neutral stance.

Now that I got that all out of my system, let me get onto the actual fucking review rather than wasting more of your precious time. Nachtmahr had a late release in 2012 with 'Veni Vidi Vici', and it follows the theme of military fetishes and global domination that Thomas Rainer has so infused the band with. And the theme works, however, I do not much appreciate the art work on the album cover. It shows a threesome with women; I am trying to listen to music, not watch a fucking porno. I shouldn't be getting hard from your artwork, but from your music because that is something that requires hardcore skills.

But, I'm just glad the artwork doesn't flow into the music as well. Most of the music just sticks with exactly what the title declares; just strict warfare lyrics. And it works very well. Most of the songs are very club going, just with a fast pace, and something to get you moving on the dance floor. And some of the songs take a more humorous tone, such as "Ich Bin".

Now, "Ich Bin" is unique in the fact that Thomas Rainer seems to have written the song in response to all the controversies he and the Nachtmahr project have received (They've been referred to as Nazis and Thomas Rainer has been called misogynistic). In the song whose drums, in my opinion, takes center stage amongst all the other beats, Rainer pretty much says he will be what he wants to be, and will always fight the trite, negative comments surrounding him. And that's such a good thing.

As usual, there are a few instrumentals fused within the album, such as "Dem Tod" and "Dunkeldisko". They are decent tracks at best, but nothing too spectacular can be said about them.

And then there were certain tracks that stood out to me, such as "Die Letzten Daemme". The beginning is very eye catching, well, ear catching if that phrase can even be used, as it starts off with the sounds of bombs going off, and debris shattering. Along with the sounds of warfare is light piano work, and what really makes the song beautiful is how they used the sounds of the bombs to lead straight into the song. I don't really know how to explain it too well, other than to say you need to listen to it yourself.

Not only that, but I did forget to mention that 'Veni Vidi Vici' is a two disc release? The second disk provides a few more new tracks featuring other artists such as Skyla Vertex (present in the song Radikal) and Xe-None (present in the song Matywka Poccnr). It also features just one remix of sorts, and that would be the remix of "Tradition" which is apparently, as detailed in the remix title, an apocalyptic version of the album. It provides regular guitar work with light synths and a deep voice providing the vocals. To me, "Tradition (apocalyptic)" provides the biggest surprise on the second disc, and it is amazing.

Prior stated, I always go into a review with an unbiased, neutral stance. And that will lead me to either be surprised by what I listen to or deeply disappointed. And after listening to Veni Vidi Vici for two weeks, I can proudly say that this album was definitely surprising. It is awesome, and can really get you moving. I've never been clubbing before, which is absolutely depressing, but I'm more than sure that if a few of these tracks squirmed there way onto the dance floor, you'd see more than one person trying to conquer the beats of this album.
5
Brutal Resonance

Nachtmahr - Veni Vidi Vici

9.0
"Amazing"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2012 by Trisol Music Group
Now, before I begin this review, I'd like to start off with a preliminary statement considering that for one reason or the other, Nachtmahr is surrounded with controversies. I, for one, always go into a review with a neutral stance, even if I already know what the band usually brings to the table. The album I could be reviewing could be from my most favorite band, one that has proven time and time again that they are absolutely fantastic, but there is always that bias that may slip it's way through causing me to give the album a higher or lower score just dependent on their previous work. But, the new album brings forth something new, so, as stated before, I always start off with a neutral stance.

Now that I got that all out of my system, let me get onto the actual fucking review rather than wasting more of your precious time. Nachtmahr had a late release in 2012 with 'Veni Vidi Vici', and it follows the theme of military fetishes and global domination that Thomas Rainer has so infused the band with. And the theme works, however, I do not much appreciate the art work on the album cover. It shows a threesome with women; I am trying to listen to music, not watch a fucking porno. I shouldn't be getting hard from your artwork, but from your music because that is something that requires hardcore skills.

But, I'm just glad the artwork doesn't flow into the music as well. Most of the music just sticks with exactly what the title declares; just strict warfare lyrics. And it works very well. Most of the songs are very club going, just with a fast pace, and something to get you moving on the dance floor. And some of the songs take a more humorous tone, such as "Ich Bin".

Now, "Ich Bin" is unique in the fact that Thomas Rainer seems to have written the song in response to all the controversies he and the Nachtmahr project have received (They've been referred to as Nazis and Thomas Rainer has been called misogynistic). In the song whose drums, in my opinion, takes center stage amongst all the other beats, Rainer pretty much says he will be what he wants to be, and will always fight the trite, negative comments surrounding him. And that's such a good thing.

As usual, there are a few instrumentals fused within the album, such as "Dem Tod" and "Dunkeldisko". They are decent tracks at best, but nothing too spectacular can be said about them.

And then there were certain tracks that stood out to me, such as "Die Letzten Daemme". The beginning is very eye catching, well, ear catching if that phrase can even be used, as it starts off with the sounds of bombs going off, and debris shattering. Along with the sounds of warfare is light piano work, and what really makes the song beautiful is how they used the sounds of the bombs to lead straight into the song. I don't really know how to explain it too well, other than to say you need to listen to it yourself.

Not only that, but I did forget to mention that 'Veni Vidi Vici' is a two disc release? The second disk provides a few more new tracks featuring other artists such as Skyla Vertex (present in the song Radikal) and Xe-None (present in the song Matywka Poccnr). It also features just one remix of sorts, and that would be the remix of "Tradition" which is apparently, as detailed in the remix title, an apocalyptic version of the album. It provides regular guitar work with light synths and a deep voice providing the vocals. To me, "Tradition (apocalyptic)" provides the biggest surprise on the second disc, and it is amazing.

Prior stated, I always go into a review with an unbiased, neutral stance. And that will lead me to either be surprised by what I listen to or deeply disappointed. And after listening to Veni Vidi Vici for two weeks, I can proudly say that this album was definitely surprising. It is awesome, and can really get you moving. I've never been clubbing before, which is absolutely depressing, but I'm more than sure that if a few of these tracks squirmed there way onto the dance floor, you'd see more than one person trying to conquer the beats of this album. Jan 03 2013

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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