Movement Ten - Build Them and They Will Come
Synthpop Being released last year in September of 2013, Movement Ten, a synthpop duo released Build Them and They Will Come. And, well, there's not much history to share about this project, so let's just get down to the thick of it and discuss the music.

The vocals can switch from your standard soothing vocals such as in Black and White Living and Plant Roots to a stronger voice such as in Halo. However, for the most part, the lead vocalist sticks with the nicer tone and plays along with the beat of the song. I have no idea what happened to his voice in Children of the Marquee, as I felt as if it was way to high pitched and was laughable at best. However, that was perhaps one of the few songs that I could point out a huge flaw in.

As far as the beats go, we are usually served up slower paced songs with equally pleasurable and calming beats. Dictionary and Plant Roots, which are side by side on the album, perhaps stick out as my two favorite songs on the album. I felt as if some of the sung out notes were held for a bit too long at points in Dictionary, and the high pitched vocals come back. However, it's fixed up in the sense that there's another voice, and perhaps a chorus effect lurking with it.

So, I'd say that this is a decent album. It definitely has its high points, and there are surely a few songs on here that I'll be listening to more often than not, however, a lot of the songs came off as unremarkable. I liked them, don't get me wrong, but I just don't see a way to enjoy them when there's so many other artists out there with similar sounding styles.
3
Brutal Resonance

Movement Ten - Build Them and They Will Come

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Spotify
Released 2013 by Movement Ten Recordings
Being released last year in September of 2013, Movement Ten, a synthpop duo released Build Them and They Will Come. And, well, there's not much history to share about this project, so let's just get down to the thick of it and discuss the music.

The vocals can switch from your standard soothing vocals such as in Black and White Living and Plant Roots to a stronger voice such as in Halo. However, for the most part, the lead vocalist sticks with the nicer tone and plays along with the beat of the song. I have no idea what happened to his voice in Children of the Marquee, as I felt as if it was way to high pitched and was laughable at best. However, that was perhaps one of the few songs that I could point out a huge flaw in.

As far as the beats go, we are usually served up slower paced songs with equally pleasurable and calming beats. Dictionary and Plant Roots, which are side by side on the album, perhaps stick out as my two favorite songs on the album. I felt as if some of the sung out notes were held for a bit too long at points in Dictionary, and the high pitched vocals come back. However, it's fixed up in the sense that there's another voice, and perhaps a chorus effect lurking with it.

So, I'd say that this is a decent album. It definitely has its high points, and there are surely a few songs on here that I'll be listening to more often than not, however, a lot of the songs came off as unremarkable. I liked them, don't get me wrong, but I just don't see a way to enjoy them when there's so many other artists out there with similar sounding styles. Mar 10 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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