Mangadrive - Botrun
Techno, Electro-Industrial It's weird to see a generally techno/rave project transform themselves into a synth/retrowave project, but perhaps it's a trend that's starting to catch one with a lot of musicians. I mean, just earlier this year industrial/electronic project Mlada Fronta released Outrun which - as the title suggests - is a huge 80s synth throwback and was very well done. Mangadrive is the next to do just that: make a shift from his generally comfortable zone and register himself as a new player in heavy synthwave 80s based music with a huge adoration for anime. 

Botrun is Mangadrive's latest work of art and, as he stated in the interview I conducted just two days ago, his favorite and best release. Speedy rave/techno elements are gone and are completely replaced by soaring synths and sci-fi inspired electronic lines. There's nothing here that audiences won't love; some fans may have some gripes about Mangadrive's shift in direction, but that will not stop me from enjoying Botrun to its fullest. 

While the synthwave field is saturated with fantastic artists and musicians such as VHS Glitch and Perturbator, but Mangadrive is etching his name in the field thanks to a non-standard sound. The first track on the album 'Two Machines Enter, One Man Lives' is a hybrid track combing Mangadrive's faster techno elements with synthwave tunes. It's fast and fun, and there's a certain frenzy about it, but it's a good place for the album to start. Tracks such as 'Lion Riders' stand out the most for their constant moving nature and always evolving electronic rhythms. It does not sound like these songs loop in the least; Botrun is an album that was written to keep the audience engaged from start to finish without ever boring or dulling down. 

There are also other songs on the album that shows off Mangadrive's experimental side such as 'Interface To Interface'. This track starts off with a delicate showcase of higher pitched notes, but later has those same notes replaced by trumpet horns. Again, for fans of his older material, his rave/techno influences are never completely gone. Later tracks on the album such as 'Omega Malevolence' are extremely addicting dance songs that will not be forgotten for quite a while. 

Mangadrive has been seeing a lot of people come up to him just to tell him that they're enjoying Botrun a lot. These are people who have been enjoying his work for years, but have learned to fall in love with his style all over again. A shift in direction and a passion for making music is all thanks to this, his hard work has paid off. Botrun is proving to be one of Mangadrive's best albums to date, not only by my standards, but also by his own, and by fans as well. If there ever was a time to check out Mangadrive, now would be the time to do so. 
4
Brutal Resonance

Mangadrive - Botrun

8.0
"Great"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2016
It's weird to see a generally techno/rave project transform themselves into a synth/retrowave project, but perhaps it's a trend that's starting to catch one with a lot of musicians. I mean, just earlier this year industrial/electronic project Mlada Fronta released Outrun which - as the title suggests - is a huge 80s synth throwback and was very well done. Mangadrive is the next to do just that: make a shift from his generally comfortable zone and register himself as a new player in heavy synthwave 80s based music with a huge adoration for anime. 

Botrun is Mangadrive's latest work of art and, as he stated in the interview I conducted just two days ago, his favorite and best release. Speedy rave/techno elements are gone and are completely replaced by soaring synths and sci-fi inspired electronic lines. There's nothing here that audiences won't love; some fans may have some gripes about Mangadrive's shift in direction, but that will not stop me from enjoying Botrun to its fullest. 

While the synthwave field is saturated with fantastic artists and musicians such as VHS Glitch and Perturbator, but Mangadrive is etching his name in the field thanks to a non-standard sound. The first track on the album 'Two Machines Enter, One Man Lives' is a hybrid track combing Mangadrive's faster techno elements with synthwave tunes. It's fast and fun, and there's a certain frenzy about it, but it's a good place for the album to start. Tracks such as 'Lion Riders' stand out the most for their constant moving nature and always evolving electronic rhythms. It does not sound like these songs loop in the least; Botrun is an album that was written to keep the audience engaged from start to finish without ever boring or dulling down. 

There are also other songs on the album that shows off Mangadrive's experimental side such as 'Interface To Interface'. This track starts off with a delicate showcase of higher pitched notes, but later has those same notes replaced by trumpet horns. Again, for fans of his older material, his rave/techno influences are never completely gone. Later tracks on the album such as 'Omega Malevolence' are extremely addicting dance songs that will not be forgotten for quite a while. 

Mangadrive has been seeing a lot of people come up to him just to tell him that they're enjoying Botrun a lot. These are people who have been enjoying his work for years, but have learned to fall in love with his style all over again. A shift in direction and a passion for making music is all thanks to this, his hard work has paid off. Botrun is proving to be one of Mangadrive's best albums to date, not only by my standards, but also by his own, and by fans as well. If there ever was a time to check out Mangadrive, now would be the time to do so. 
Apr 17 2016

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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