Machines On Blast - Tin Man Empire
Industrial Metal Machines On Blast is a name that the industrial metal genre might not be all that familiar with; the band just started out in 2014 with an alright, but promising self titled EP. It was on that self-titled release that elements from aggrotech, industrial, and metal fused together to create what would become Machines On Blast's sound. However, the problem with their debut was that they really weren't pushing out to be different; the vocals and some of the beats and rhythms present on the EP just sounded like generic shit that I've heard other places before. It was that identity crisis that diverted myself away from them for a good while, as I had much more to listen to. 

However, now that it is 2016, I was pointed in their direction by a friend of mine again. I do remember somewhat rolling my eyes at the mention of their name, but I decided to give them another shot in the dark. I immediately digressed any sarcastic comments or negative connotation that I had previously associated Machines On Blast with as soon as I listened to the first track on their first release of 2016 Tin Man Empire. The sound is revamped, front man of the group Evan Mitchell has taken his vocals and transformed them completely, and everything is much, much more angry, loud, and brings back a 90s industrial sound. 

'Chemical Coma' comes off as if a Mortal Kombat track got hit with a heavy dose of destructive guitar work. Mitchell's distorted, angry vocals sounds like a heavy metal cyborg is preparing to launch the very best show on Earth. 'Bathe in the Blood of Our Enemies' continues the onslaught with further extended guitar notes. There's a renewed focus on synth work, allowing electronic sounds to emerge more than previously. 

'The One' is a quick paced jam out song; Mitchell's vocals change from the distorted, cyborg like tone to a clearer, more concise (and more understandable) tone. However, 'Breathe' comes back in and delivers some heavy industrial sludge, knocking away any pretense that Tin Man Empire might be lightening up anytime soon. 

I even dare to say that there are some punk influences on the album, as for one reason or another, 'Self Righteous Affliction' just screams exactly that. Perhaps it's the general attitude that Machines on Blast puts out, but I doubt anyone would really disagree with my opinion. 'My Friend Misery' was another lighter, fast paced track; it would be fun to dance to, and even has some chorus effected vocals in them. This is like a mixture of synthpop and industrial like no other, and I absolutely loved it. 

'Let It Go' is not a cover of the famous song from Disney's Frozen - which I may have been a little disappointed with - but is a very slow, atmospheric track on the album with vocals that reminisce Marilyn Manson. There's even a second set of cords on the album that belong to an unknown voice, but they are well done nonetheless. 

'Salvation' and 'Automation' were good efforts, but - aside from a few notches here and there - I felt as if they sounded similar to previous tracks on the album. I will not say they're bad, as they are well written and performed, but you won't miss out on much should you decide to skip them. 'The Killer' is the first track on the album where drums really fucking kick the shit out of all the other elements present in the song.

'Repeating' began off as if it were going to dive straight into synthwave territory - which would have been a huge shock - but that was not the case as Machines On Blast's sound soon started up. That's not to say that the retro backing electronics went away, as they stayed for the whole song and provided a wonderful groove to the song. 'Feast' was another song where the drums took over, so fans of that particular instrument should take a look at it. 'Rise Up' was the final song, and blended electronic and industrial seamlessly, interspersing segments between metal and more quiet synth based moments. 

Now that's all through and through, I do think that Machines On Blast will come out as an industrial metal project that will have to be watched. The band has drive, has melody, and knows how to mix up things by including several different genres in their tracks. Whether its that 90s industrial sound, or mixing up synthwave tactics or synthpop-esque melodies, Machines On Blast has it all even if they didn't inten
4
Brutal Resonance

Machines On Blast - Tin Man Empire

7.5
"Good"
N/A
Electroracle
Released off label 2016
Machines On Blast is a name that the industrial metal genre might not be all that familiar with; the band just started out in 2014 with an alright, but promising self titled EP. It was on that self-titled release that elements from aggrotech, industrial, and metal fused together to create what would become Machines On Blast's sound. However, the problem with their debut was that they really weren't pushing out to be different; the vocals and some of the beats and rhythms present on the EP just sounded like generic shit that I've heard other places before. It was that identity crisis that diverted myself away from them for a good while, as I had much more to listen to. 

However, now that it is 2016, I was pointed in their direction by a friend of mine again. I do remember somewhat rolling my eyes at the mention of their name, but I decided to give them another shot in the dark. I immediately digressed any sarcastic comments or negative connotation that I had previously associated Machines On Blast with as soon as I listened to the first track on their first release of 2016 Tin Man Empire. The sound is revamped, front man of the group Evan Mitchell has taken his vocals and transformed them completely, and everything is much, much more angry, loud, and brings back a 90s industrial sound. 

'Chemical Coma' comes off as if a Mortal Kombat track got hit with a heavy dose of destructive guitar work. Mitchell's distorted, angry vocals sounds like a heavy metal cyborg is preparing to launch the very best show on Earth. 'Bathe in the Blood of Our Enemies' continues the onslaught with further extended guitar notes. There's a renewed focus on synth work, allowing electronic sounds to emerge more than previously. 

'The One' is a quick paced jam out song; Mitchell's vocals change from the distorted, cyborg like tone to a clearer, more concise (and more understandable) tone. However, 'Breathe' comes back in and delivers some heavy industrial sludge, knocking away any pretense that Tin Man Empire might be lightening up anytime soon. 

I even dare to say that there are some punk influences on the album, as for one reason or another, 'Self Righteous Affliction' just screams exactly that. Perhaps it's the general attitude that Machines on Blast puts out, but I doubt anyone would really disagree with my opinion. 'My Friend Misery' was another lighter, fast paced track; it would be fun to dance to, and even has some chorus effected vocals in them. This is like a mixture of synthpop and industrial like no other, and I absolutely loved it. 

'Let It Go' is not a cover of the famous song from Disney's Frozen - which I may have been a little disappointed with - but is a very slow, atmospheric track on the album with vocals that reminisce Marilyn Manson. There's even a second set of cords on the album that belong to an unknown voice, but they are well done nonetheless. 

'Salvation' and 'Automation' were good efforts, but - aside from a few notches here and there - I felt as if they sounded similar to previous tracks on the album. I will not say they're bad, as they are well written and performed, but you won't miss out on much should you decide to skip them. 'The Killer' is the first track on the album where drums really fucking kick the shit out of all the other elements present in the song.

'Repeating' began off as if it were going to dive straight into synthwave territory - which would have been a huge shock - but that was not the case as Machines On Blast's sound soon started up. That's not to say that the retro backing electronics went away, as they stayed for the whole song and provided a wonderful groove to the song. 'Feast' was another song where the drums took over, so fans of that particular instrument should take a look at it. 'Rise Up' was the final song, and blended electronic and industrial seamlessly, interspersing segments between metal and more quiet synth based moments. 

Now that's all through and through, I do think that Machines On Blast will come out as an industrial metal project that will have to be watched. The band has drive, has melody, and knows how to mix up things by including several different genres in their tracks. Whether its that 90s industrial sound, or mixing up synthwave tactics or synthpop-esque melodies, Machines On Blast has it all even if they didn't inten
Mar 03 2016

Off label

Official release released by the artist themselves without the backing of a label.

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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