Lydia Lunch & Philippe Petit - Taste Our Voodoo
Experimental Lydia Lunch is a pretty busy women, appearing in films and plays, writing poetry, and also, as shown in this release, is a singer. Her counterpart for this release is Philippe Petit, a French underground music personality, owning a record label, being a journalist, and also being a musical travel-agent. Putting the talents of both these talented people should've been something of dreams, but I'm honestly afraid that it's not.

At times inspiring to be creepy, at times influencing wonders of the mind, it's still a beautiful scramble to find the love for this album. What I can say that's awesome about this is the quality of the live songs being performed. Honestly, I thought it was recorded in a studio at first, but I thought wrong. As for the bad of this album, well, let's just say that Lydia doesn't sound all too well.

If the album was meant to sound as if she were dying, then it did well. But not many people want to listen to a woman talk like a beaten and scarred witch for all too long. The music itself did it's job well enough, being creepy and moody at all times, but it was so overpowered by the vocals that it hardly counted for much of the album. And when each of the songs are about twenty minutes a piece, it does get kind of annoying to listen to the same sounding stuff over and over.

The dark nature of this album shines through, I will not say that it hasn't. But it's not a beautiful morbid art piece to look at, instead, it's something more along the lines of a bad horror movie that no one really wants to watch. It was fun to listen to for the first minute or so, but after dragging on for eighty minutes, I have given up in listening to this album once and for all.
2
Brutal Resonance

Lydia Lunch & Philippe Petit - Taste Our Voodoo

4.0
"Bad"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2013 by Rustblade
Lydia Lunch is a pretty busy women, appearing in films and plays, writing poetry, and also, as shown in this release, is a singer. Her counterpart for this release is Philippe Petit, a French underground music personality, owning a record label, being a journalist, and also being a musical travel-agent. Putting the talents of both these talented people should've been something of dreams, but I'm honestly afraid that it's not.

At times inspiring to be creepy, at times influencing wonders of the mind, it's still a beautiful scramble to find the love for this album. What I can say that's awesome about this is the quality of the live songs being performed. Honestly, I thought it was recorded in a studio at first, but I thought wrong. As for the bad of this album, well, let's just say that Lydia doesn't sound all too well.

If the album was meant to sound as if she were dying, then it did well. But not many people want to listen to a woman talk like a beaten and scarred witch for all too long. The music itself did it's job well enough, being creepy and moody at all times, but it was so overpowered by the vocals that it hardly counted for much of the album. And when each of the songs are about twenty minutes a piece, it does get kind of annoying to listen to the same sounding stuff over and over.

The dark nature of this album shines through, I will not say that it hasn't. But it's not a beautiful morbid art piece to look at, instead, it's something more along the lines of a bad horror movie that no one really wants to watch. It was fun to listen to for the first minute or so, but after dragging on for eighty minutes, I have given up in listening to this album once and for all. Feb 02 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

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