<dE/mutE> - Words
Ambient, Noise Inspired by various quotes from the world over, Germany's has crafted a seven track album titled Words that encompasses multiple spanning genres. Collaborating with other artists (Mary Urbach, Warszawa, Psychepoppet, N.fra, and Tim Berghoff, Words brought in a bunch of different styles and mixed them together to good effect.

The intro was quite enthralling; using Shelley's Ozymandias in the Intro over ambient styles was brilliant, and still remains stuck in my head. The next track, Walking Falling, takes a bit more of an electronic style, faster, but not harsh on the ears at all. A bit of noise comes into play to give it a bit of a kick.

Ecce Homo begins off with some odd sounds and slight static; I'm not sure what I could compare it to, perhaps that of what one would feel as they were coming out from being knocked out. The heavy ambient rings that occur are nice and creepy, and stray more into the drone territory. Nothing terrible, but nothing fancy either.

söylemek begins off with some organ like sounds and a acousitc instruments; there's still a feeling of being deeply immersed in some sort of far off and natural place. As the drums kick in, more tribal, the song gets a nice tone to it. The chanting was nice, however, I felt as if the digital effects and constant echoes on the chords ruined the overall feel of the chants. Other than that, the instrumentation present in the song was great.

Next up came WWI, and drone notes were the name of the game. Layering on top of one another, and also quoting T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land was pretty sweet. However, aside from the spoken out lyrics quoting a righteous passage, the overall song didn't really go much further than it did in the first four minutes. It was bland. The same can be said for the next song, as it largely focused on drones and quoted the same passage again, though this time toward the end of the song.

Little children's laughs introduced One day I will find..., and we were given a more dark ambient structure with samples splattered throughout, and slight electronic effects whizzing here and there, like a digital wind. The second half of the song brought a low rhythm to the field of play, as well as some piano work. But, again, though there were two distinct parts of the song, and each lasted about seven and a half minutes a piece, they didn't really change in their own fragments, and remained pretty stale throughout. Not bad music, just music that didn't know how to change up the pace. And that's my main complaint about this guy.

It's not that he's bad at creating music; that's far from the point. I think he has tremendous talent behind those digitally rendering fingers; however, when you create a nearly seventeen minute long track that doesn't do much to change at all, you can't expect people wanting to sit and listen to what you have to put out. But, still, I look forward to his next release. And that's that.
3
Brutal Resonance

<dE/mutE> - Words

6.5
"Alright"
N/A
Electroracle
Released 2014 by Carbon12 Records
Inspired by various quotes from the world over, Germany's has crafted a seven track album titled Words that encompasses multiple spanning genres. Collaborating with other artists (Mary Urbach, Warszawa, Psychepoppet, N.fra, and Tim Berghoff, Words brought in a bunch of different styles and mixed them together to good effect.

The intro was quite enthralling; using Shelley's Ozymandias in the Intro over ambient styles was brilliant, and still remains stuck in my head. The next track, Walking Falling, takes a bit more of an electronic style, faster, but not harsh on the ears at all. A bit of noise comes into play to give it a bit of a kick.

Ecce Homo begins off with some odd sounds and slight static; I'm not sure what I could compare it to, perhaps that of what one would feel as they were coming out from being knocked out. The heavy ambient rings that occur are nice and creepy, and stray more into the drone territory. Nothing terrible, but nothing fancy either.

söylemek begins off with some organ like sounds and a acousitc instruments; there's still a feeling of being deeply immersed in some sort of far off and natural place. As the drums kick in, more tribal, the song gets a nice tone to it. The chanting was nice, however, I felt as if the digital effects and constant echoes on the chords ruined the overall feel of the chants. Other than that, the instrumentation present in the song was great.

Next up came WWI, and drone notes were the name of the game. Layering on top of one another, and also quoting T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land was pretty sweet. However, aside from the spoken out lyrics quoting a righteous passage, the overall song didn't really go much further than it did in the first four minutes. It was bland. The same can be said for the next song, as it largely focused on drones and quoted the same passage again, though this time toward the end of the song.

Little children's laughs introduced One day I will find..., and we were given a more dark ambient structure with samples splattered throughout, and slight electronic effects whizzing here and there, like a digital wind. The second half of the song brought a low rhythm to the field of play, as well as some piano work. But, again, though there were two distinct parts of the song, and each lasted about seven and a half minutes a piece, they didn't really change in their own fragments, and remained pretty stale throughout. Not bad music, just music that didn't know how to change up the pace. And that's my main complaint about this guy.

It's not that he's bad at creating music; that's far from the point. I think he has tremendous talent behind those digitally rendering fingers; however, when you create a nearly seventeen minute long track that doesn't do much to change at all, you can't expect people wanting to sit and listen to what you have to put out. But, still, I look forward to his next release. And that's that.
Aug 27 2014

Steven Gullotta

info@brutalresonance.com
I've been writing for Brutal Resonance since November of 2012 and now serve as the editor-in-chief. I love the dark electronic underground and usually have too much to listen to at once but I love it. I am also an editor at Aggressive Deprivation, a digital/physical magazine since March of 2016. I support the scene as much as I can from my humble laptop.

Share this review

Facebook
Twitter
Google+
16
Shares

Buy this release

Bandcamp (Digital)

Shortly about us

Started in spring 2009, Brutal Resonance quickly grew from a Swedish based netzine into an established International zine of the highest standard.

We cover genres like Synthpop, EBM, Industrial, Dark Ambient, Neofolk, Darkwave, Noise and all their sub- and similar genres.

© Brutal Resonance 2009-2016
Designed by and developed by Head of Mímir 2016